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(The Big Lead)   Keith Olbermann goes after Pete Prisco and his idiotic concussion lawsuit settlement column (video)   (thebiglead.com) divider line 19
    More: Cool, Pete Prisco, Keith Olbermann, leather helmet  
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1723 clicks; posted to Sports » on 31 Aug 2013 at 1:15 PM (50 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2013-08-31 01:30:29 PM
4 votes:

TuteTibiImperes: If the NFL knew about the risks and was hiding some of them from the players, the settlement seems appropriate, and that seems to be the case of what happened.   The players went in knowing there was a risk of injury, even concussion, just not the possible extent nor the potential damage from repeated smaller impacts.


I know you're going after the NFL for knowing about concussions, but I have to say this about this argument:  I don't care if the risk of death was better than 50/50, a worker or player knowing the risk of it does not absolve the employer of their responsibility to their workers.  I said this in the other thread that we've gotten away from treating the worker like a person rather than as a part that can be discarded without a second thought, and arguments like this encourage that.  If you make this argument here, you have to be able to make it everywhere; and if you're not willing to make that argument to absolve coal corporations from their responsibility to take care of miners who get black lung, or the government from their responsibility for their soldiers to at least get VA benefits, then you're being hypocritical.  I don't care if NFL players are paid millions to play a game while coal miners are paid a pittance for back-breaking work; a worker is a worker, and if a corporation isn't willing to provide for them for the hazards of their job, that corporation should not be in business. Period.
2013-08-31 04:57:34 PM
2 votes:

star_topology: This is called dissecting an argument.

I especially liked the literary repetition of "back to the column."


It was perfect.  Olbermann didn't have to call Prisco names or drag him through the mud.  He just proved, point by point, why Prisco was wrong.  This is what journalism is supposed to be like.
2013-08-31 03:32:49 PM
2 votes:
Nobody does on-air sanctimony quite like Olbermann.  But when he's right, he's right.
2013-08-31 12:48:44 PM
2 votes:
If the NFL knew about the risks and was hiding some of them from the players, the settlement seems appropriate, and that seems to be the case of what happened.  The players went in knowing there was a risk of injury, even concussion, just not the possible extent nor the potential damage from repeated smaller impacts.

It was the right move by the NFL to settle, it will keep the league from getting mired in lawsuits, it provides care for those who need it, and it will let this story wrap up on a feel good note and fade into the background once the season really starts picking up.
2013-09-01 05:48:05 AM
1 votes:

I sound fat: Prisco is right, this is a money grab. I could argue that its warranted or not warranted, but they knew the risks.


No they didn't know the risks. The NFL has known for quite some time, but they wouldn't tell anyone. And given the NFL has refused to take care of retired players in need, even though it knows exactly what they're in need, it's the farthest thing from a money grab.
2013-09-01 03:20:28 AM
1 votes:

Mentat: enderthexenocide: RockChalkH1N1: Who would have thought that playing a violent sport could cause future head problems?

i'm sure the players knew they might have joint pain in their retirement or other physical issues like that.  but i don't think any of them realized the brain damage they might suffer after years of hits.  they knew they would get concussions, but they thought that it would be a temporary thing, and they could heal from a concussion and go on to enjoy their retirement.  they probably knew retired players who didn't seem to have any lasting affects, but those retired players might have been hiding the damage because they maybe felt ashamed about it?  everyone thinks they are immortal, and no football player would want to think they'll wind up with dementia or memory loss at age 40.  the nfl did not inform players of the long-term affects of repeated concussions, that's what the lawsuit was about.

I remember when Steve Young was about to retire how many jokes were made about him being a vegetable from all of the concussions.  And then there was the minor point that football was almost banned in the early 20th century because so many people were dying of head injuries.  We may not have known all of the biochemical and physiological associated with concussions, and were certainly didn't know about the effects of multiple sub-concussive events over the course of a lifetime.  But as I said earlier, we've certainly known for decades about the concept of being punch-drunk.


For the 94th time, the problem that no one knew about wasn't the damage caused by concussions or huge hits.  It's the damage caused by repeated low-level impacts such as bumping heads at the line.
2013-08-31 09:10:42 PM
1 votes:

Yakk: cameroncrazy1984: I love the fact that someone was too cowardly to post about my comments in this thread, but I got a wonderful spittle-flecked email from some guy that thought a smart argument used a gay slur at least 4 times and included the random epithet "white trash liberal," which was different.

What a coward! However, you can't post that and then not post the email, just clean it up! :)

/I am telling you, KO has a superpower to piss people off.


UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: Really? Hell, I'm kinda lonely and it seems like I never get any e-mail. So let me go on record as a HUGE Keith Olbermann fan


I've just got that special ability to push the buttons of mouthbreathers. It's a gift.

robsul82: I've been signed up for the Boston Red Sox fan E-Mail notifications for years now, lol.


Aaand, I laughed.
2013-08-31 07:27:47 PM
1 votes:
Considering the first accepted diagnosis of CTE with a former NFL player wasn't until 2002, let's stop pretending for the entire 20th century every swinging dick was an expert in neuroscience and that  "everyone knew the risks".

Today's players probably do. Not ones who stopped playing decades ago. And neither did you, the fan.
2013-08-31 06:20:15 PM
1 votes:
Anyone who thinks that concussions are no big deal or are overblown should read Chris Benoit's autopsy report
2013-08-31 06:01:35 PM
1 votes:

Trollin4Colon: I don't know much about KO other than the hate he gets on here from fark, but that was poignant and impressive. Absolutely shredded him. Im kinda in shock at how good a piece that was.


Here is a short summation:

He had FoxNews so angry at him when he was on MSNBC, that during a Republican debate they were chanting GE's name as an enemy of the state because they owned MSNBC. The man has a superpower to piss people off.

I have been watching his new ESPN show and it is very very good, but so was his MSNBC show at the beginning. At the end the MSNBC show was a show of no-name sycophants and spin like what his show used to fight against. He also said on the air once that he was "The (sixth?) most powerful news-person in the US", which I found disgusting.  Like many clever men his own ego is his worst enemy. I hope this new show does not crash and burn like the other one.
2013-08-31 05:39:55 PM
1 votes:

Trollin4Colon: I don't know much about KO other than the hate he gets on here from fark, but that was poignant and impressive. Absolutely shredded him. Im kinda in shock at how good a piece that was.


Well, that's politics, either you agree with him or you don't.
2013-08-31 05:38:30 PM
1 votes:
I don't know much about KO other than the hate he gets on here from fark, but that was poignant and impressive. Absolutely shredded him. Im kinda in shock at how good a piece that was.
2013-08-31 05:01:03 PM
1 votes:

dletter: I even do feel bad to the extent that, if a kid is put into pop warner at 8-9 years old, and likes football, and happens to be talented at their position in football, before they even have any realization about the possible effects of consistent play of the game over years and years.... is that much different than getting "addicted" to something else at much too young of an age? I wouldn't be much against a "ban" on full-on tackle football until 7th-8th grade. Do 7 and 8 years olds really need to go full speed at each other?


I love football. plain and simple.  I will never allow any son or daughter I may have to play pop warner, or middle school football.  It can be absurdly detrimental to their body's development, and the more we learn about the cumulative effects of CTE the more we should raise awareness of the dangers.
2013-08-31 04:40:35 PM
1 votes:
This is called dissecting an argument.

I especially liked the literary repetition of "back to the column."
2013-08-31 04:38:55 PM
1 votes:

Waldo Pepper: TuteTibiImperes: Dafatone: Damn.

Prisco has one valid point.  We are all hypocrites for watching.

Are we?  I mean, all things being equal I'd like the players to get out of the game healthy.  At the same time there are plenty of hazardous and dangerous sports and activities, and at the end of the day you just have to accept that such risk comes with the game.  The only ways to completely remove it would change the game so much that it would no longer be the same sport. On that level the survival of the sport and the league can be seen as more important than the health of any individual player.

Even knowing what we know now about the risks, if I had the talent and the skill I'd gladly play on the line of any NFL team even for league minimum salary.

agreed.  I realize a player can get majorly hurt at any point in his/her career but how many would have a much higher quality of life if they get out after 5 years instead of staying in for 10-15 years.


Which is all true, but, there is a point to be made that, just like movie stars, etc, the public attention and adoration on pro sports (especially the NFL, but, even college and High School football in many areas) makes playing the sport attractive to those who have the skillset.  

I have to agree (and I can't exclude myself from being part of the issue) that it is hypocritical to actively be a "fan" of the NFL, and then say that the NFL should dramatically change the game and (to a certain extent) feel "sorry" for the players that this has happened to many of them.   I dofeel bad for the older players, that played before as much was known about these issues, and before their was the level of pay to counter balance that.  I feel bad for the families of the men who end up like a Jim McMahon, or Jr. Seau, etc.   I even do feel bad to the extent that, if a kid is put into pop warner at 8-9 years old, and likes football, and happens to be talented at their position in football, before they even have any realization about the possible effects of consistent play of the game over years and years.... is that much different than getting "addicted" to something else at much too young of an age?   I wouldn't be much against a "ban" on full-on tackle football until 7th-8th grade.  Do 7 and 8 years olds really need to go full speed at each other?

But, did I just finish up a Dyansty fantasy draft? Yes.  Will I watch the Bears on Sunday?  Yes.   I agree with the "They agree to the job" aspect to a large extent, and, I'll say, if this issue shuts down the NFL some day (either from lawuits, or from an attrition of talent actually growing up to play football).... so be it.... we'll all find something else to do.   I am (and was much more) an Arena Football fan, and then the league went defunct after 2008 (before coming back in a lesser form in 2010).  Did I miss it in 2009... yes..... would I have missed it less as time when on if it didn't come back... yes.
2013-08-31 01:34:08 PM
1 votes:
Meanwhile, on the subject of the lawsuit, I thought KO's story on Doug Kotar Thursday was slightly better.
2013-08-31 01:02:41 PM
1 votes:

cameroncrazy1984: I'm glad KO is back.


say what you will about his politics, he is a fantastic sports journalist.
2013-08-31 12:35:06 PM
1 votes:
Damn.  Olbermann proves here he belongs in sports media.  That was fantastic, and incredibly sad.
2013-08-31 12:33:22 PM
1 votes:
I'm glad KO is back.
 
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