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(Bloomberg)   American hipster chefs stuff $500 tasting menus with farm-fresh, protein-light, offbeat veggies. "Luxury at this level requires a certain degree of awareness. The beeswax alone is $100 to $200 a pound"   (bloomberg.com) divider line 81
    More: Ironic, Americans, Wagyu, cantaloupes, anchovies, carrot cake, sardines, caviar, sturgeons  
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3029 clicks; posted to Geek » on 31 Aug 2013 at 6:47 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-31 06:58:53 AM
If this is what people will pay big money for, I could make a fortune with whats growing in my back yard.

www.bloomberg.com
 
2013-08-31 07:01:32 AM
If he's paying that much for beeswax he's doing it wrong. Beeswax is pretty cheap stuff, even cheaper if you buy honeycomb from someone that raises bees and melt it down yourself.
 
2013-08-31 07:03:13 AM
If my palate were sensitive enough to appreciate such things, I might buy it. But I can't tell the difference, alas.

I do like growing things for people though.
 
2013-08-31 07:07:03 AM
Oh just fark off already
 
2013-08-31 07:07:13 AM

ReapTheChaos: If this is what people will pay big money for, I could make a fortune with whats growing in my back yard.


It reminds me of the charcuterie fad a few years back, pay big bucks for something Italians have been eating as regular food for generations. Same with the places offering parts of cow and pig that aren't the norm. In a big city you can get that stuff from any good butcher for prices that don't exactly have anything to do with what the places trying to be all trendy sell it for
 
2013-08-31 07:15:34 AM

WhyteRaven74: ReapTheChaos: If this is what people will pay big money for, I could make a fortune with whats growing in my back yard.

It reminds me of the charcuterie fad a few years back, pay big bucks for something Italians have been eating as regular food for generations. Same with the places offering parts of cow and pig that aren't the norm. In a big city you can get that stuff from any good butcher for prices that don't exactly have anything to do with what the places trying to be all trendy sell it for


I grew up in western NY, not far from Buffalo when the whole "Buffalo wing" fad took off back in the late 70's. Back then butchers would give bags of them away free if you bought something else from them, so poor people would come up with all kind of ways to eat them. That's how chicken wings started, poor people food.
 
2013-08-31 07:17:55 AM

ReapTheChaos: hat's how chicken wings started, poor people food.


A lot of food started off that way. Hell lobster was something fed to servants, when it was consumed by people at all, until not very long ago. And even then, it wasn't fed to servants often because it was basically viewed as garbage food and well can't feed that to your servants too often.
 
2013-08-31 07:23:58 AM

WhyteRaven74: If he's paying that much for beeswax he's doing it wrong. Beeswax is pretty cheap stuff, even cheaper if you buy honeycomb from someone that raises bees and melt it down yourself.


Oh, but these bees are cage free heirloom bees, they make small batch, artisanal beeswax.

My favorite thing: "biodegradable charcoal." What a great scam!
 
2013-08-31 07:26:56 AM
The fact that there are conspicuous consumers who will pay these preposterous prices doesn't change the fact that charging and paying them are both moral affronts.
As another poster pointed out: F**k off already.
 
2013-08-31 07:27:26 AM

Rev. Creflo Baller: My favorite thing: "biodegradable charcoal." What a great scam!


I read that and thought "As opposed to?", also given the composition of charcoal, there's not much to degrade either.
 
2013-08-31 07:27:42 AM

abhorrent1: Oh just fark off already


Came to post exactly this. Just fark off up your own asshole and pay through the nose for the privelige
 
2013-08-31 07:50:59 AM

WhyteRaven74: ReapTheChaos: If this is what people will pay big money for, I could make a fortune with whats growing in my back yard.

It reminds me of the charcuterie fad a few years back, pay big bucks for something Italians have been eating as regular food for generations. Same with the places offering parts of cow and pig that aren't the norm. In a big city you can get that stuff from any good butcher for prices that don't exactly have anything to do with what the places trying to be all trendy sell it for


One of the big problems at the time was that you couldn't import preserved meats from Italy, so restaurants had to buy from local suppliers and honestly the stuff wasn't as good as you'd get an average family restaurant anywhere in central Italy.  Blessed, the law's just been changed and we should start getting all sorts of salts Italian meatstuffs any day now.

WhyteRaven74: ReapTheChaos: hat's how chicken wings started, poor people food.

A lot of food started off that way. Hell lobster was something fed to servants, when it was consumed by people at all, until not very long ago. And even then, it wasn't fed to servants often because it was basically viewed as garbage food and well can't feed that to your servants too often.


Bingo: any gourmet foodstuff, from escargot to caviar to lobster started out as poor people food.  in New England in the 17th Century, indentured servants had it written into their contracts that they couldn't be served lobster (or I think oysters) more than three days a week!
 
2013-08-31 07:56:50 AM
There's a farmer that knows a sucker when he sees one. A whole restaurant full...
 
2013-08-31 08:00:28 AM

ReapTheChaos: WhyteRaven74: ReapTheChaos: If this is what people will pay big money for, I could make a fortune with whats growing in my back yard.

It reminds me of the charcuterie fad a few years back, pay big bucks for something Italians have been eating as regular food for generations. Same with the places offering parts of cow and pig that aren't the norm. In a big city you can get that stuff from any good butcher for prices that don't exactly have anything to do with what the places trying to be all trendy sell it for

I grew up in western NY, not far from Buffalo when the whole "Buffalo wing" fad took off back in the late 70's. Back then butchers would give bags of them away free if you bought something else from them, so poor people would come up with all kind of ways to eat them. That's how chicken wings started, poor people food.


Miss our food?
 
2013-08-31 08:19:07 AM
It's not what you buy its how much you pay for it that gives you status
 
2013-08-31 08:25:25 AM

Dwight_Yeast: indentured servants had it written into their contracts that they couldn't be served lobster (or I think oysters) more than three days a week!


it was lobster.

Dwight_Yeast: so restaurants had to buy from local suppliers and honestly the stuff wasn't as good as you'd get an average family restaurant anywhere in central Italy.


There's that, though depending on where you are local suppliers can be good, I know here in Chicago there's a few that are run by Italians and their stuff beats the pants off the stuff from other suppliers, even though that stuff is by no means bad.
 
2013-08-31 08:27:45 AM

WhyteRaven74: If he's paying that much for beeswax he's doing it wrong. Beeswax is pretty cheap stuff, even cheaper if you buy honeycomb from someone that raises bees and melt it down yourself.


Right? I must have several hundred thousand dollars worth of the stuff in my garage right now.
also, most of it is unfiltered, so hey, free "light animalprotien" in the form of little dead bee bodies!
 
2013-08-31 08:32:22 AM

Meatsim1: It's not what you buy its how much you pay for it that gives you status




This.

You can't take it with you.
 
2013-08-31 08:36:15 AM

WhyteRaven74: Dwight_Yeast: indentured servants had it written into their contracts that they couldn't be served lobster (or I think oysters) more than three days a week!

it was lobster.


I actually meant also oysters. I know lobsters were mentioned.  Oysters were the size of a dinner plate and shockingly common in Cape Cod and all the waters around NYC (New Amsterdam).

It wasn't until the end of the 19th century that stocks became so depleted that oysters became a delicacy.
 
2013-08-31 08:38:33 AM

Dwight_Yeast: Oysters were the size of a dinner plate and shockingly common in Cape Cod and all the waters around NYC (New Amsterdam).


I wonder what those old huge oysters tasted like. I know some animals once they get too big the taste just isn't there.
 
2013-08-31 08:46:21 AM
I'm sorry if I'm gonna spend an arm and a leg on a meal I damned well better be getting something with some animal protein that I would be hard pressed to be capable of cooking at home. I love fruits and veggies but I would never give someone $1200 to put together an assortment of items from their local farmers market that is slightly tarted up. I'll just go down to my local farmers market spend $15 and eat produce like a king and use the remaining money to buy a new computer or a set of golf clubs or something.

/most expensive meal I have paid for was $200 for 2 people
//delicious waste of farking money
 
2013-08-31 09:02:19 AM

ReapTheChaos: I grew up in western NY, not far from Buffalo when the whole "Buffalo wing" fad took off back in the late 70's. Back then butchers wou


They use to be about $20-27 for a 40lb box when I was growing up
 
2013-08-31 09:17:23 AM

WhyteRaven74: ReapTheChaos: hat's how chicken wings started, poor people food.

A lot of food started off that way. Hell lobster was something fed to servants, when it was consumed by people at all, until not very long ago. And even then, it wasn't fed to servants often because it was basically viewed as garbage food and well can't feed that to your servants too often.


They fed lobsters to prisoners in New England.  Which makes me wonder if any of the prisoners were habitual repeat offenders.
 
2013-08-31 09:27:05 AM

WhyteRaven74: Rev. Creflo Baller: My favorite thing: "biodegradable charcoal." What a great scam!

I read that and thought "As opposed to?", also given the composition of charcoal, there's not much to degrade either.


C + O = CO +CO2

Not balanced for your pleasure
 
2013-08-31 09:41:57 AM
This is what rich people want:

l3.yimg.com
 
2013-08-31 10:15:01 AM
"At Meadowood's chef's counter, the protein-light tasting for two, plus wine pairings, will exceed $2,000. Is it worth it? "

i0.kym-cdn.com

YOU IDIOTS,
 
2013-08-31 10:23:22 AM
"Luxury at this level requires a certain degree of awareness."

Translation:  You need to be told that what you're eating is good.  And you'll believe it, because you're stupid, and you'll gladly make yourself my biatch and give me your money.
 
2013-08-31 10:32:31 AM

ReapTheChaos: WhyteRaven74: ReapTheChaos: If this is what people will pay big money for, I could make a fortune with whats growing in my back yard.

It reminds me of the charcuterie fad a few years back, pay big bucks for something Italians have been eating as regular food for generations. Same with the places offering parts of cow and pig that aren't the norm. In a big city you can get that stuff from any good butcher for prices that don't exactly have anything to do with what the places trying to be all trendy sell it for

I grew up in western NY, not far from Buffalo when the whole "Buffalo wing" fad took off back in the late 70's. Back then butchers would give bags of them away free if you bought something else from them, so poor people would come up with all kind of ways to eat them. That's how chicken wings started, poor people food.


Bingo. and every years a few more poor people food dishes get discovered by some shrieking ass food critic, the price goes through the roof and the wage slaves are out a few more meals. sunsabiatches do it to affordable wines several times a year too. These SOB's should get the "Who is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe?" treatment, maybe it would discourage others.
 
2013-08-31 10:33:20 AM
FTA: When you think about it, dining has really come full circle. When you were young, your parents told you to eat your lima beans. Now that you're all grown-up, you're being fed Sun Gold tomatoes with sardine-infused tomatillo water at Saison as part of a $248 prix fixe.

No, no I'm really not.
 
2013-08-31 10:39:53 AM
Best quote from the comments:

"The tax for upper income brackets in the USA should be raised asap. This includes the long-term capital gains loophole."
 
2013-08-31 10:47:28 AM
The rich are once again claiming poor food and driving up the prices! Whoo!

Lovely. Now, the rich will do for borage, kale, radish, and other basic vegetables what they did for other foods typically eaten by folks who couldn't afford better - drive the price to the point where the poor are forced to once again rummage for foodstuffs considered unsuitable by the fashionable.
 
2013-08-31 10:49:36 AM

KrispyKritter: ReapTheChaos: WhyteRaven74: ReapTheChaos: If this is what people will pay big money for, I could make a fortune with whats growing in my back yard.

It reminds me of the charcuterie fad a few years back, pay big bucks for something Italians have been eating as regular food for generations. Same with the places offering parts of cow and pig that aren't the norm. In a big city you can get that stuff from any good butcher for prices that don't exactly have anything to do with what the places trying to be all trendy sell it for

I grew up in western NY, not far from Buffalo when the whole "Buffalo wing" fad took off back in the late 70's. Back then butchers would give bags of them away free if you bought something else from them, so poor people would come up with all kind of ways to eat them. That's how chicken wings started, poor people food.

Bingo. and every years a few more poor people food dishes get discovered by some shrieking ass food critic, the price goes through the roof and the wage slaves are out a few more meals. sunsabiatches do it to affordable wines several times a year too. These SOB's should get the "Who is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe?" treatment, maybe it would discourage others.


Exactly. The worst part of it is that, right now, the disparity between those living on subsistence and those living in luxury is about as wide as it was during the friggin' robber baron years, so seeing such things - you can feed a family for a month on that $500 "tasting menu" - is particularly galling.
 
2013-08-31 11:07:07 AM
There should be a Boondocks Saints sequel where they just go around to these restaurants and execute everyone inside.
 
2013-08-31 11:27:06 AM

FormlessOne: KrispyKritter: ReapTheChaos: WhyteRaven74: ReapTheChaos: If this is what people will pay big money for, I could make a fortune with whats growing in my back yard.

It reminds me of the charcuterie fad a few years back, pay big bucks for something Italians have been eating as regular food for generations. Same with the places offering parts of cow and pig that aren't the norm. In a big city you can get that stuff from any good butcher for prices that don't exactly have anything to do with what the places trying to be all trendy sell it for

I grew up in western NY, not far from Buffalo when the whole "Buffalo wing" fad took off back in the late 70's. Back then butchers would give bags of them away free if you bought something else from them, so poor people would come up with all kind of ways to eat them. That's how chicken wings started, poor people food.

Bingo. and every years a few more poor people food dishes get discovered by some shrieking ass food critic, the price goes through the roof and the wage slaves are out a few more meals. sunsabiatches do it to affordable wines several times a year too. These SOB's should get the "Who is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe?" treatment, maybe it would discourage others.

Exactly. The worst part of it is that, right now, the disparity between those living on subsistence and those living in luxury is about as wide as it was during the friggin' robber baron years, so seeing such things - you can feed a family for a month on that $500 "tasting menu" - is particularly galling.




$500 a month. Sure thing moneybags.
 
2013-08-31 11:31:52 AM

WhyteRaven74: ReapTheChaos: hat's how chicken wings started, poor people food.

A lot of food started off that way. Hell lobster was something fed to servants, when it was consumed by people at all, until not very long ago. And even then, it wasn't fed to servants often because it was basically viewed as garbage food and well can't feed that to your servants too often.


Skirt steak was the same. Prior to the 1980's, it was seen as a garbage cut, and it was dirt-cheap. Once fajitas started to become a thing, prices began to skyrocket, and now the price is comparable by weight to sirloin.
 
2013-08-31 11:35:05 AM

Rev. Creflo Baller: My favorite thing: "biodegradable charcoal." What a great scam!


No, this can't be a real thing. Don't even bother linking a page: I'll not read it. I'm just going to choose to believe this is BS and keep a little portion of my sanity.
 
2013-08-31 11:54:16 AM

jayhawk88: Rev. Creflo Baller: My favorite thing: "biodegradable charcoal." What a great scam!

No, this can't be a real thing. Don't even bother linking a page: I'll not read it. I'm just going to choose to believe this is BS and keep a little portion of my sanity.


Wait 'til someone tells you about fat-free cereal.
 
2013-08-31 12:07:33 PM
Luxury at that level also demands a certain amount of fark off, proles.
 
2013-08-31 12:29:32 PM
Oysters, lobster, chicken wings, polenta aka mush, ramps, morels are just a few foods the rich discovered and ruined for every one else.
 
2013-08-31 12:58:10 PM

FormlessOne: The rich are once again claiming poor food and driving up the prices! Whoo!
Lovely. Now, the rich will do for borage, kale, radish, and other basic vegetables what they did for other foods typically eaten by folks who couldn't afford better - drive the price to the point where the poor are forced to once again rummage for foodstuffs considered unsuitable by the fashionable.


I hear their pampered asses are great after a few hours in the smoker. Long Pig ftw.
 
2013-08-31 01:07:43 PM
I couldn't understand half the words in that article. Must be because of my lowly prole background. Can someone break it down into layman terms?
 
2013-08-31 01:26:51 PM

WhyteRaven74: ReapTheChaos: If this is what people will pay big money for, I could make a fortune with whats growing in my back yard.

It reminds me of the charcuterie fad a few years back, pay big bucks for something Italians have been eating as regular food for generations. Same with the places offering parts of cow and pig that aren't the norm. In a big city you can get that stuff from any good butcher for prices that don't exactly have anything to do with what the places trying to be all trendy sell it for


You're paying for the preparation moreso than the actual ingredients.  One of the more expensive entres at an Argentinian Steakhouse I go to is a platter of various offal - sweetbreads, chitlins, blood sausage, and some traditional sausages and roasted pepper to round it out.  None of the ingredients cost as much per lbs as a ribeye or filet mignon, but the skill it takes to prepare them to be extra delicious justifies the price.

Pig feet, hog ears, head cheese, artisanally cured meats, various organ cuts, etc, all take skill and time to prepare.  I can make a killer steak in my own kitchen, if I'm going out I like to get something that I wouldn't be able to or willing to go through the trouble of cooking at home.
 
2013-08-31 01:28:27 PM
DNRTFA, but the Bloomberg icon started me thinking about the intersection between hipsters and investment bankers, working at a boutique you main streeters probably haven't heard of yet.
 
2013-08-31 01:29:30 PM
I bet a lot of meals at those places are on expense accounts.

Personally, I'd like to be treated to a $2,000 meal. I'd like to see for myself it it's better than what I make from veggies from my garden.
I suspect it's not 2000 times better.
 
2013-08-31 01:45:11 PM

Krieghund: Personally, I'd like to be treated to a $2,000 meal. I'd like to see for myself it it's better than what I make from veggies from my garden.
I suspect it's not 2000 times better.


I suspect that the only "better" is the conspicuous consumption aspect.  I've yet to find any correlation between how much food costs and how good it is, once you get past "free moldy/stale crap".
 
2013-08-31 01:49:03 PM
Hipsters. Someday they will make a movie about the Killing Fields of America. The boxart will feature a thousand pairs of lesbian librarian glasses scattered across some Midwestern plain.
 
2013-08-31 01:51:06 PM
$2000 tasting menu.
That means I won't be full, and I'll be mad as hell.

STICK IT, TRENDITE.
 
2013-08-31 01:57:28 PM

Mid_mo_mad_man: Oysters, lobster, chicken wings, polenta aka mush, ramps, morels are just a few foods the rich discovered and ruined for every one else.


The ultimate example: Kopi luwak

Not only were the Sumatrins poor, the Dutch prohibited them from using any of the coffee they picked.  So the natives found another source.  Until the Dutch discovered it, and ruined that for the natives too.

/never tasted it, but I do not envy the rich their cat poop coffee.
 
2013-08-31 02:04:12 PM

Vlad_the_Inaner: Mid_mo_mad_man: Oysters, lobster, chicken wings, polenta aka mush, ramps, morels are just a few foods the rich discovered and ruined for every one else.

The ultimate example: Kopi luwak

Not only were the Sumatrins poor, the Dutch prohibited them from using any of the coffee they picked.  So the natives found another source.  Until the Dutch discovered it, and ruined that for the natives too.

/never tasted it, but I do not envy the rich their cat poop coffee.


Heh.  Just made a correlation between this phenomenon and my observation a few minutes ago that there's little if any correlation between food quality and price.

The hipsters, like their forebears (they were NOT doing it before it was cool) notice that there's some rather cheap food that is actually pretty good.  That is when the ball starts rolling.
 
2013-08-31 02:26:11 PM
Hipsters cut things into strange shapes, put them on square plates, and  cover them with cilantro, and try to sell it with "image".

I am going to show you an example from Colombia.

There is a traditional dish from Medellin called "la bandeja paisa" it is a large meal consisting of rice,beans, sausage, fried pork belly, steak,plantains, avocado with a fried egg on top.  It was created to get you through a hard, long day on the farm.

Here is a traditional bandeja paisa you can get for around 8,000 pesos(4 bucks) in a little mom and pop shop.

img.foodnetwork.com

Here is a hipster haute cuisine bandeja paisa that runs 25k(12.5 bucks) in Bogota

www.unileverfoodsolutionslatam.com
 
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