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(io9)   Honey is pretty much the only food that doesn't go bad. Why?   (io9.com) divider line 195
    More: Interesting, hydrogen peroxides, Alexander the Great, lovers, nectars, open wound  
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19073 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Aug 2013 at 9:14 PM (50 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



195 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-08-30 05:24:29 PM
because bees don;t have refrigerators.
 
2013-08-30 05:26:26 PM
Because its almost pure sucrose and no bacteria can live in its environment.

You can pickle things with sugar as well as salt.
 
2013-08-30 05:33:56 PM
It's bee sh*t

/how bad could it get?
 
2013-08-30 05:43:09 PM
i105.photobucket.com
 
2013-08-30 05:57:44 PM
Less known is that sago also doesn't go bad.  When it is first processed, within a day or so it starts smelling like it's spoiled.  But that's it.  It doesn't go bad (the smell goes away when it is cooked).  It can be left unrefrigerated for long periods of time in tropical areas in which pretty much everything immediately rots.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2013-08-30 06:07:45 PM
Vinegar?  Salt?  Sugar?

That's kind of like asking what's the only edible orchid?

Is it vanilla or salep?
 
2013-08-30 07:18:53 PM
I don't know, Sugartits.
 
2013-08-30 07:23:02 PM
Unlike subby's mom's snatch, which I can attest is very rotten
 
2013-08-30 07:31:28 PM
Sugar doesn't go bad.
 
2013-08-30 07:32:45 PM
I have a twinkie from 1986 that is still edible.  So your theory is incorrect, subby.
 
2013-08-30 07:34:14 PM
Keep flour in an airtight container and it will last for nearly forever, subby.
Dried fruit, too.
 
2013-08-30 07:55:08 PM
"Honey is magic."

Article done in one sentence. What's the writer's Fark handle.
 
2013-08-30 08:05:29 PM
Because it's sugar.  Sugar doesn't go bad.

What do I nguyen?
 
2013-08-30 09:02:59 PM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t

/how bad could it get?


No it isn't

/Bee barf
 
2013-08-30 09:17:15 PM
Bullshiat. Bourbon doesn't go bad either.
 
2013-08-30 09:18:43 PM
And Keef Richards too.
 
2013-08-30 09:19:14 PM
Had to throw out a bunch of shortening that had gone bad the other day.
 
2013-08-30 09:20:03 PM
Maraschino Cherries have a half-life of 4.3 billion years....
 
2013-08-30 09:20:43 PM

Lsherm: I have a twinkie from 1986 that is still edible.


How do you know?
 
2013-08-30 09:22:23 PM
Most peanut butter also doesn't really go bad either.  The oil can start becoming rancid, but the amount of salt and sugar keeps it from getting rotten or moldy. Although it can still be contaminated by bacteria, but that doesn't happen if its just sitting in a jar.
 
2013-08-30 09:22:30 PM
Hey, haggis never goes bad. Or at least it can't get any worse.
 
2013-08-30 09:22:54 PM
And Super Honey kills MRSA http://www.superhoney.org/
 
2013-08-30 09:26:00 PM
The term is actually hygroscopic.
 
2013-08-30 09:26:15 PM
Does maple syrup go bad? (or should I say, go worse?)
 
2013-08-30 09:28:51 PM
But the remaining honey in the bottle always hardens and crystallizes... is that not considered "going bad"?

/garylarsoncartoon.jpg
 
2013-08-30 09:30:58 PM

empres77: But the remaining honey in the bottle always hardens and crystallizes... is that not considered "going bad"?


If you got bored halfway through the article, I suggest going back to it for your answer.
 
2013-08-30 09:31:13 PM
I beg to differ :

i291.photobucket.com

i291.photobucket.com

/and by beg, i mean fap
 
2013-08-30 09:32:18 PM
So stock up on honey for the bunker. Check
 
2013-08-30 09:34:41 PM

empres77: But the remaining honey in the bottle always hardens and crystallizes... is that not considered "going bad"?

/garylarsoncartoon.jpg


No, it's just solidifying. Heat it up, and it will return to its natural state.
 
2013-08-30 09:35:33 PM

Hollie Maea: Less known is that sago also doesn't go bad.  When it is first processed, within a day or so it starts smelling like it's spoiled.  But that's it.  It doesn't go bad (the smell goes away when it is cooked).  It can be left unrefrigerated for long periods of time in tropical areas in which pretty much everything immediately rots.


i1.ytimg.com

When it goes off, it tastes exactly the same as when it's fresh.
 
2013-08-30 09:36:07 PM
There's also a protein in the sugary bee barf that emits small amounts of hydrogen peroxide if it does get wet.
 
2013-08-30 09:37:34 PM
Sugar.

Salt.

Alcohol.

Vinegar.

How do they work?

/wood smoke to a degree
 
2013-08-30 09:38:16 PM

the_sidewinder: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t

/how bad could it get?

No it isn't

/Bee barf


David Brenner will confirm
 
2013-08-30 09:38:23 PM
www.thisthatnew.com
 
2013-08-30 09:38:55 PM
www.badassoftheweek.com
/don't care
//don't give a shiat
 
2013-08-30 09:39:58 PM
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-08-30 09:41:19 PM

theorellior: There's also a protein in the sugary bee barf that emits small amounts of hydrogen peroxide if it does get wet.


Interesting? Is that why honey tastes so unpleasant?
 
2013-08-30 09:42:18 PM

Nick Nostril: Bullshiat. Bourbon doesn't go bad either.


Mine doesn't last long enough for me to find out.
 
2013-08-30 09:43:09 PM
I find adding water and a small amount of yeast to honey helps to enhance the flavors over time.
 
2013-08-30 09:44:15 PM
I'm still waiting for my cilantro to go good.
 
2013-08-30 09:45:09 PM

LordOfThePings: Hollie Maea: Less known is that sago also doesn't go bad.  When it is first processed, within a day or so it starts smelling like it's spoiled.  But that's it.  It doesn't go bad (the smell goes away when it is cooked).  It can be left unrefrigerated for long periods of time in tropical areas in which pretty much everything immediately rots.

[i1.ytimg.com image 480x360]

When it goes off, it tastes exactly the same as when it's fresh.


I just watched that episode last night. Still funny after about the 35th time.
 
2013-08-30 09:46:41 PM

Canton: theorellior: There's also a protein in the sugary bee barf that emits small amounts of hydrogen peroxide if it does get wet.

Interesting? Is that why honey tastes so unpleasant?


YMMV, my friend. Just means more sugary bee barf for me.

Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.
 
2013-08-30 09:47:38 PM
Am I reading wrong? They say honey shouldn't be in temperatures from 50 to 70 degrees so no fridge. But your fridge should be at most 40 degrees. What am I missing?
 
2013-08-30 09:48:27 PM
You know what else doesn't go bad?  The Baby Jesus.
 
2013-08-30 09:49:26 PM
Hot sauce, pickles, and lowfat milk also never go bad.
 
2013-08-30 09:49:51 PM
Because nothing grows in poop.
 
2013-08-30 09:51:51 PM

theorellior: Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.


"How does it  .... smoke?"
www.nickmongo.com
 
2013-08-30 09:52:39 PM
FTFA:
"So the final key to honey remaining unspoiled is making sure it's well sealed and stored in a dry place."

If it's well sealed, why in the King Fark does it matter where you store it?
 
2013-08-30 09:53:08 PM
Inever go bad.
 
2013-08-30 09:54:21 PM

John Buck 41: Inever go bad.


Well, damn. That didn't turn out quite right.
 
2013-08-30 09:54:33 PM
This information bodes well for that pack of KFC honey from 1987 that I've been holding onto.
 
2013-08-30 09:55:14 PM

Hollie Maea: Less known is that sago


/fixed
 
2013-08-30 09:56:22 PM

Jon iz teh kewl: neither does Marmite.


Something cannot "go" bad when it's already there.
 
2013-08-30 09:57:25 PM

the_sidewinder: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t

/how bad could it get?

No it isn't

/Bee barf


Right, like that's so much better.
 
2013-08-30 09:59:53 PM

Gyrfalcon: the_sidewinder: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t

/how bad could it get?

No it isn't

/Bee barf

Right, like that's so much better.


Right, like that's the point.  Or like it matters.
 
2013-08-30 10:00:51 PM
Cause I dipped my pecker in it. That's why.
 
2013-08-30 10:01:15 PM
I've recently wondered if humus ever goes bad.  It doesn't seem to.
 
2013-08-30 10:01:26 PM

addy2: Am I reading wrong? They say honey shouldn't be in temperatures from 50 to 70 degrees so no fridge. But your fridge should be at most 40 degrees. What am I missing?


I noticed that too. I assume it was a typo or maybe the writer just doesn't know what temperature fridges keep.
 
2013-08-30 10:03:46 PM

MurphyMurphy: Sugar.

Salt.

Alcohol.

Vinegar.


How do they work?

/wood smoke to a degree


Not foods.

/unless you know of an organism that eats any of them
//and by "eats" i mean "subsists on"
///and I suppose "organism" should be bigger than a bacterium
////I'll settle for bacterium just out of curiosity
 
2013-08-30 10:08:51 PM

jaytkay: Lsherm: I have a twinkie from 1986 that is still edible.

How do you know?


Oh, it's been out of its wrapper since 1996.  We use a toothpick to pick off part of it every Christmas and eat it.  We aren't even halfway through, so I figure it might last until I die.

They shrink a little bit, and the middle hollows out eventually, but it still retains the shape.
 
2013-08-30 10:09:41 PM

ArcadianRefugee: ////I'll settle for bacterium just out of curiosity


Why wine goes sour (and where most of the vinegar comes from)
During fermentation, activity by yeast cells naturally produces a small amount of acetic acid. If the wine is exposed to oxygen, Acetobacter bacteria will convert the ethanol into acetic acid.
 
2013-08-30 10:11:45 PM
Also, it's a good idea to spend a couple bucks more and get honey from a local apiary or supplier. The blended honey you see in supermarkets may or may not have HFCS, dyes, or any number of crazy extenders in it.
 
2013-08-30 10:12:07 PM
I've got a Fruit Fly population in my garage / shop that is growing increasingly annoying.

Recently I tried making a trap by drizzling some honey onto a paper plate, expecting that the next morning a bunch of the little bastards would be caught up in it like a herd of Mastodons in a tar pit.

As it happens, not one farking fly in two days and nights.  TFA says that honey is fairly acidic, so maybe that's why they wouldnt touch it.
 
2013-08-30 10:13:34 PM
Just remember, a lot of what you buy as honey isn't real honey. Corn syrup everywhere. If you get a local supplier or from a farmer's market or the like, all the better.

The stay fresh rule does not apply if the honeycomb is included, IIRC.
 
2013-08-30 10:16:15 PM

theorellior: Canton: theorellior: There's also a protein in the sugary bee barf that emits small amounts of hydrogen peroxide if it does get wet.

Interesting? Is that why honey tastes so unpleasant?

YMMV, my friend. Just means more sugary bee barf for me.

Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.


Hmm. I may have to try that, if I can track down a small jar of local honey. My only fear is that it would be totally wasted on me.

Awful, isn't it? I love insects, I don't fear bees, and I'd have no problem eating their vomit if only my taste buds appreciated the stuff.

/Le sigh
//At least there's always maple syrup
///Mmm, tree sap...
 
2013-08-30 10:17:37 PM

theorellior: Canton: theorellior: There's also a protein in the sugary bee barf that emits small amounts of hydrogen peroxide if it does get wet.

Interesting? Is that why honey tastes so unpleasant?

YMMV, my friend. Just means more sugary bee barf for me.

Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.


I've had peanut butter and syrup sandwiches with chili but I've never tried peanut butter and honey. I'm intrigued by the idea.
 
2013-08-30 10:17:44 PM

MrHappyRotter: Gyrfalcon: the_sidewinder: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t

/how bad could it get?

No it isn't

/Bee barf

Right, like that's so much better.

Right, like that's the point.  Or like it matters.


Oh dear god, you're already tightening the sphincter on your sarcasm meter, aren't you? And it's barely Friday night on a long weekend...
 
2013-08-30 10:19:22 PM

Gyrfalcon: MrHappyRotter: Gyrfalcon: the_sidewinder: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t

/how bad could it get?

No it isn't

/Bee barf

Right, like that's so much better.

Right, like that's the point.  Or like it matters.

Oh dear god, you're already tightening the sphincter on your sarcasm meter, aren't you? And it's barely Friday night on a long weekend...


What I do with my sphincter on a Friday night is NONE OF YOUR FLUNKING BUSINESS.
 
2013-08-30 10:19:58 PM

TomD9938: I've got a Fruit Fly population in my garage / shop that is growing increasingly annoying.

Recently I tried making a trap by drizzling some honey onto a paper plate, expecting that the next morning a bunch of the little bastards would be caught up in it like a herd of Mastodons in a tar pit.

As it happens, not one farking fly in two days and nights.  TFA says that honey is fairly acidic, so maybe that's why they wouldnt touch it.


Fruit flies are attracted to vinegar.  Take notes.  No need to thank me later.
 
2013-08-30 10:20:32 PM
Ginger snaps never go bad, they actually get better.
 
2013-08-30 10:20:54 PM

Gyrfalcon: the_sidewinder: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t

/how bad could it get?

No it isn't

/Bee barf

Right, like that's so much better.


On warm home-made toast with butter? Man, that's heaven.
 
2013-08-30 10:22:30 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Hot sauce, pickles, and lowfat milk also never go bad.


Pickles don't go bad because they are already evil.


One of my favorite memories as a kid, was going out with my Grandfather to tend his bee hives. He always made sure to get stung at least once on the back of each hand before he was done. I asked him why, and he said it made his arthritis a lot less painful for about a week.
 
2013-08-30 10:22:51 PM

MrHappyRotter: TomD9938: I've got a Fruit Fly population in my garage / shop that is growing increasingly annoying.

Recently I tried making a trap by drizzling some honey onto a paper plate, expecting that the next morning a bunch of the little bastards would be caught up in it like a herd of Mastodons in a tar pit.

As it happens, not one farking fly in two days and nights.  TFA says that honey is fairly acidic, so maybe that's why they wouldnt touch it.

Fruit flies are attracted to vinegar.  Take notes.  No need to thank me later.


Wow. I seriously thought you were making a honey/vinegar joke, but apparently you were not.

Maybe vinegar used as bait in a homemade flytrap would solve the fruit fly problem...
 
2013-08-30 10:25:06 PM

Canton: MrHappyRotter: TomD9938: I've got a Fruit Fly population in my garage / shop that is growing increasingly annoying.

Recently I tried making a trap by drizzling some honey onto a paper plate, expecting that the next morning a bunch of the little bastards would be caught up in it like a herd of Mastodons in a tar pit.

As it happens, not one farking fly in two days and nights.  TFA says that honey is fairly acidic, so maybe that's why they wouldnt touch it.

Fruit flies are attracted to vinegar.  Take notes.  No need to thank me later.

Wow. I seriously thought you were making a honey/vinegar joke, but apparently you were not.

Maybe vinegar used as bait in a homemade flytrap would solve the fruit fly problem...


I have used those and it does work. I used clear cellophane with small holes poked in it to cover a small cup of vinegar; they can get in but they can't find their way out.
 
2013-08-30 10:26:07 PM

TomD9938: I've got a Fruit Fly population in my garage / shop that is growing increasingly annoying.

Recently I tried making a trap by drizzling some honey onto a paper plate, expecting that the next morning a bunch of the little bastards would be caught up in it like a herd of Mastodons in a tar pit.

As it happens, not one farking fly in two days and nights.  TFA says that honey is fairly acidic, so maybe that's why they wouldnt touch it.


It's been said already but they LOVE vinegar. Get yourself some cider vinegar (sweeter = better for this) and a couple small bowls or cups (I use jelly jars because I have a couple dozen lying around).

Put about an inch-deep of vinegar and drop 1 or 2 drops of dish soap (to break the surface tension) in each cup, and set them around in various areas of your garage. Then come back the next day and be amazed.

/home brewer
//one fruit fly can turn 5 gallons of beer into vinegar
///probably the best vinegar you'll ever have but I still would rather have the beer
 
2013-08-30 10:26:52 PM

MrHappyRotter: TomD9938: I've got a Fruit Fly population in my garage / shop that is growing increasingly annoying.

Recently I tried making a trap by drizzling some honey onto a paper plate, expecting that the next morning a bunch of the little bastards would be caught up in it like a herd of Mastodons in a tar pit.

As it happens, not one farking fly in two days and nights.  TFA says that honey is fairly acidic, so maybe that's why they wouldnt touch it.

Fruit flies are attracted to vinegar.  Take notes.  No need to thank me later.



Interesting.  Will it work as a trap though?

I'm not really looking to give them an awesome treat.

/ will try some malted vinegar in the bottom of a cup tonight...
 
2013-08-30 10:27:15 PM
www.bubblews.com

/currently eating oats that were in its unopened plastic packaging - bought over 3 years ago; still tastes yummy!
 
2013-08-30 10:27:21 PM

Skyfrog: theorellior: Canton: theorellior: There's also a protein in the sugary bee barf that emits small amounts of hydrogen peroxide if it does get wet.

Interesting? Is that why honey tastes so unpleasant?

YMMV, my friend. Just means more sugary bee barf for me.

Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.

I've had peanut butter and syrup sandwiches with chili but I've never tried peanut butter and honey. I'm intrigued by the idea.


peanut butter, apple slices, honey and bacon sandwich.
 
433 [TotalFark]
2013-08-30 10:27:32 PM
...because it's just that good.
 
2013-08-30 10:29:15 PM

Canton: theorellior: Canton: theorellior: There's also a protein in the sugary bee barf that emits small amounts of hydrogen peroxide if it does get wet.

Interesting? Is that why honey tastes so unpleasant?

YMMV, my friend. Just means more sugary bee barf for me.

Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.

Hmm. I may have to try that, if I can track down a small jar of local honey. My only fear is that it would be totally wasted on me.

Awful, isn't it? I love insects, I don't fear bees, and I'd have no problem eating their vomit if only my taste buds appreciated the stuff.

/Le sigh
//At least there's always maple syrup
///Mmm, tree sap...


FWIW, honey will taste dramatically different depending on what plants the bees have been pollinating and whatnot. Clover honey tends to be pretty light, mild, and sweet. Chestnut honey is bitter as fark. Pine honey is (usually) the nectar of the gods. Most local honey comes from a variety of sources and may taste good or bad (to you) depending on the plants, the particular hive, the year/weather, etc. Also, if you're just eating honey straight, you might find it more enjoyable if you tried it on a piece of fresh bread or some other medium.

If you end up getting local honey from a beekeeper, see if he can tell you the probable source or let you try a sample or something or if he can recommend a particular batch you might enjoy.

/used to hate honey
//met a beekeeper/baker, tried tons of different kinds of honey
///loved some, liked some, hated some
////also, honey + peanut butter = delicious
 
2013-08-30 10:31:09 PM
io9 is pretty much a site written by morons that keeps getting Fark greenlights.
 
2013-08-30 10:32:25 PM
blog.zap2it.com

Decomposing ever since she could eat.
 
2013-08-30 10:32:52 PM
How about dog's mi...

LordOfThePings:
[i1.ytimg.com image 480x360]

When it goes off, it tastes exactly the same as when it's fresh.


SON OF A...

That's it.  I'm out this biatch.  Y'all are doing JUST FINE WITHOUT ME.
 
2013-08-30 10:33:31 PM

From the article:

But honey crystallizes most quickly at temperatures of between 50 and 59 °F. So, if you want to avoid having to heat your honey to remove crystals (apparently slow, indirect heat is best for that, by the way), avoid the refrigerator.


Who the fark is keeping their refrigerator this warm? Refrigerators should be between 34 and 40 °F. Over 40 °F and food is officially in the "danger zone" that promotes bacterial growth.
 
2013-08-30 10:33:31 PM

GungFu: [www.bubblews.com image 605x640]

/currently eating oats that were in its unopened plastic packaging - bought over 3 years ago; still tastes yummy!


http://aht.seriouseats.com/archives/2010/11/the-burger-lab-revisitin g- the-myth-of-the-12-year-old-burger-testing-results.html
 
2013-08-30 10:34:00 PM

GungFu: [www.bubblews.com image 605x640]


morgan spurlock is a farking idiotic, science-hating coont. That is the politest true statement I can say about him.

/covering something in salt will help prevent microbial growth
//as will adding chemical preservatives
 
2013-08-30 10:34:22 PM
Thanks all, will try it.  I hope they like malted vinegar, cause, you know... that's all I've got in the house at the moment.
 
2013-08-30 10:35:00 PM

Skyfrog: theorellior: Canton: theorellior: There's also a protein in the sugary bee barf that emits small amounts of hydrogen peroxide if it does get wet.

Interesting? Is that why honey tastes so unpleasant?

YMMV, my friend. Just means more sugary bee barf for me.

Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.

I've had peanut butter and syrup sandwiches with chili but I've never tried peanut butter and honey. I'm intrigued by the idea.


It's really good.  When I'm on a diet and need a low-cal snack, I just mix up a bowl of peanut butter and honey and that does the trick.  If the peanut butter jar is more than 1/3 gone I just pour the honey right in and eat it with a malt spoon. Or drizzle it over a block of cream cheese.
 
2013-08-30 10:35:19 PM

Cerebral Knievel: Because its almost pure sucrose and no bacteria can live in its environment.

You can pickle things with sugar as well as salt.


No it isn't.  It is almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1.

downstairs: Sugar doesn't go bad.


It is good to see people are finally starting to realize that glucose and fructose are sugars just like sucrose.

There are a few factors as to why honey doesn't spoil.
1.  Honey has such a high solids level that microbes (with the exception of a few hardcore yeasts that don't actually spoil the honey) can't grow in it
2.  Honey is very thick.  It is literally difficult for molecules to move around and undergo chemical reactions.  Things like oxidation can't happen when oxygen molecules can't make their way into the honey
3.  Bee spit has anti-microbials

No chemical spoilage and no microbial spoilage = stable product

/HFCS is also almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1
 
2013-08-30 10:36:23 PM

42_42_42: From the article:

But honey crystallizes most quickly at temperatures of between 50 and 59 °F. So, if you want to avoid having to heat your honey to remove crystals (apparently slow, indirect heat is best for that, by the way), avoid the refrigerator.

Who the fark is keeping their refrigerator this warm? Refrigerators should be between 34 and 40 °F. Over 40 °F and food is officially in the "danger zone" that promotes bacterial growth.


...and who the fark is keeping honey in the refrigerator, in the first place?
 
2013-08-30 10:36:31 PM
Skyfrog:I've had peanut butter and syrup sandwiches with chili but I've never tried peanut butter and honey. I'm intrigued by the idea.

Peanut butter and honey sandwiches are great, I always preferred it over using jelly.
 
2013-08-30 10:37:23 PM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t puke


FTFY
 
2013-08-30 10:40:18 PM

dittybopper: Because it's sugar.  Sugar doesn't go bad.

What do I nguyen?


RogermcAllen: Cerebral Knievel: Because its almost pure sucrose and no bacteria can live in its environment.

You can pickle things with sugar as well as salt.

No it isn't.  It is almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1.

downstairs: Sugar doesn't go bad.

It is good to see people are finally starting to realize that glucose and fructose are sugars just like sucrose.

There are a few factors as to why honey doesn't spoil.
1.  Honey has such a high solids level that microbes (with the exception of a few hardcore yeasts that don't actually spoil the honey) can't grow in it
2.  Honey is very thick.  It is literally difficult for molecules to move around and undergo chemical reactions.  Things like oxidation can't happen when oxygen molecules can't make their way into the honey
3.  Bee spit has anti-microbials

No chemical spoilage and no microbial spoilage = stable product

/HFCS is also almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1


Honey contains trace amounts of peroxide which inhibits microbial growth (guess that's what you meant by anti-microbials). That's why it could be put on wounds to dress them (stops infection, or adds flavor for bears, either way...).

It's amazing stuff. Behold the power of waggle dance.
 
2013-08-30 10:42:05 PM

TomD9938: I've got a Fruit Fly population in my garage / shop that is growing increasingly annoying.

Recently I tried making a trap by drizzling some honey onto a paper plate, expecting that the next morning a bunch of the little bastards would be caught up in it like a herd of Mastodons in a tar pit.

As it happens, not one farking fly in two days and nights.  TFA says that honey is fairly acidic, so maybe that's why they wouldnt touch it.


Best fruit-fly trap is to put some overripe fruit in a small glass container, then cover it tightly with plastic wrap.  Poke some small holes in the plastic wrap.  The fruit flies will be attracted to the CO2 and aldehydes being given off by the rotting fruit, and they won't fly back out.  After a few days, cover with another layer of plastic wrap and freeze to kill.
 
2013-08-30 10:42:54 PM
Demands a recount:
img2u.info
 
2013-08-30 10:43:11 PM
True story: I was biking in a rural area and spotted about half of a Slim Jim in the dirt close to the road. I figured it would be gone the next time I biked by, but a week later there it was. There are plenty of skunks, rats and coyotes in the area so I was surprised it lasted so long. But three months later it was still there. Nothing was eating it, no bugs, birds, bacteria, or mammals would touch the thing. It shriveled and leeched some oil around itself as the summer got hotter so it had a wet looking area around it. But it wasn't touched. Finally got some rain and it disappeared, I think it just washed into the ditch.
I wouldn't eat one of those things on a bet now.
 
2013-08-30 10:43:50 PM
I thought white rice could last forever if kept dry and critter free.
 
2013-08-30 10:44:35 PM

MrHappyRotter: Gyrfalcon: MrHappyRotter: Gyrfalcon: the_sidewinder: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t

/how bad could it get?

No it isn't

/Bee barf

Right, like that's so much better.

Right, like that's the point.  Or like it matters.

Oh dear god, you're already tightening the sphincter on your sarcasm meter, aren't you? And it's barely Friday night on a long weekend...

What I do with my sphincter on a Friday night is NONE OF YOUR FLUNKING BUSINESS.


Howabout on a Saturday morning?
 
2013-08-30 10:44:41 PM

PacManDreaming: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t puke

FTFY


It's closer to chewing something up and spitting it out as it never goes into the bee's digestive stomach.

/my $.02
 
2013-08-30 10:45:13 PM
BECAUSE FARK YOU, THAT'S WHY.
 
2013-08-30 10:46:24 PM

Yotto: /home brewer
//one fruit fly can turn 5 gallons of beer into vinegar
///probably the best vinegar you'll ever have but I still would rather have the beer


Five gallons of the best vinegar I ever had would be worth well over one hundred thousand dollars.
/curiously, it is unknown whether bacon will go bad either.
 
2013-08-30 10:46:54 PM
Wait, you're telling me it's not because it has f**kin magnets in it?
 
2013-08-30 10:51:19 PM
Does beef jerkey go bad? I guess it would, but never took the time to find out.
 
2013-08-30 10:52:50 PM

Ablejack: Yotto: /home brewer
//one fruit fly can turn 5 gallons of beer into vinegar
///probably the best vinegar you'll ever have but I still would rather have the beer

Five gallons of the best vinegar I ever had would be worth well over one hundred thousand dollars.
/curiously, it is unknown whether bacon will go bad either.


You know, making good vinegar is surprisingly hard. I actually tried it with several small 1-gallon batches of mead and beer. I did everything "right" (kept it between 5-7% abv, used yeast that would completely dry them out). Added mother, and it did its thing. Almost every single one was so rediculously tart that I couldn't stand it. Like, it hurt to taste.

There's a ton of information about making wine and beer NOT go bad, but there's a strange shortage of information on purposely making wine and beer go bad on purpose.
 
2013-08-30 10:53:56 PM
Is it because honey don't give a fark?
 
2013-08-30 11:02:04 PM

Thanks for the Meme-ries: I beg to differ :


dvdmedia.ign.com


camel.ethereal.net
 
2013-08-30 11:03:07 PM

Gyrfalcon: MrHappyRotter: Gyrfalcon: MrHappyRotter: Gyrfalcon: the_sidewinder: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t

/how bad could it get?

No it isn't

/Bee barf

Right, like that's so much better.

Right, like that's the point.  Or like it matters.

Oh dear god, you're already tightening the sphincter on your sarcasm meter, aren't you? And it's barely Friday night on a long weekend...

What I do with my sphincter on a Friday night is NONE OF YOUR FLUNKING BUSINESS.

Howabout on a Saturday morning?


I'm dying to know; Is it remarkable?
 
2013-08-30 11:03:22 PM

stamped human bacon: PacManDreaming: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t puke

FTFY

It's closer to chewing something up and spitting it out as it never goes into the bee's digestive stomach.

/my $.02


The more I learn about honey, the less I WANT TO KNOW, THANK YOU VERY MUCH.
 
2013-08-30 11:03:43 PM

Cerebral Knievel: Because its almost pure sucrose and no bacteria can live in its environment.

You can pickle things with sugar as well as salt.


It's actually because it has a super low moisture content.
The difference between honey other sugars is its acidity. Honey's pH is between 3.26-4.48 which also kills off anything that would harm the honey.

And for "The More You Know"..  bacteria has a hard time at high altitudes because of the lack of moisture.  Living at altitude for 8 years, and I have only gotten sick once, and that was stomach flu.. and I know the child culprit from the front range who gave it to me... bastard.

/ beekeeper apprentice
// getting a hive this year, to start up in April
 
2013-08-30 11:04:42 PM

Gyrfalcon: stamped human bacon: PacManDreaming: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t puke

FTFY

It's closer to chewing something up and spitting it out as it never goes into the bee's digestive stomach.

/my $.02

The more I learn about honey, the less I WANT TO KNOW, THANK YOU VERY MUCH.


Have I got something to tell you about milk...
 
2013-08-30 11:05:03 PM
GungFu:

Well, McDs food is processed and cooked, so it tends to drive out most moisture. A fresh watermelon is like 90-95% moisture, as it's mostly water.

Bacteria thrive on moisture.

So...
 
2013-08-30 11:05:06 PM

CowardlyLion: GungFu: [www.bubblews.com image 605x640]

morgan spurlock is a farking idiotic, science-hating coont. That is the politest true statement I can say about him.

/covering something in salt will help prevent microbial growth
//as will adding chemical preservatives


Wasn't that the entire point of the demonstration?
 
2013-08-30 11:06:36 PM

KarmicDisaster: Because nothing grows in poop.


Tell that to the magic mushrooms.
 
2013-08-30 11:07:05 PM

TomD9938: Thanks all, will try it.  I hope they like malted vinegar, cause, you know... that's all I've got in the house at the moment.


and forget about the bottle. just use a coffee cup or tumbler. I like the tumbler because then you can see all the little bastards at the bottom. few drops of dish soap and any kind of vinegar.
 
2013-08-30 11:08:28 PM

FrancoFile: TomD9938: I've got a Fruit Fly population in my garage / shop that is growing increasingly annoying.

Recently I tried making a trap by drizzling some honey onto a paper plate, expecting that the next morning a bunch of the little bastards would be caught up in it like a herd of Mastodons in a tar pit.

As it happens, not one farking fly in two days and nights.  TFA says that honey is fairly acidic, so maybe that's why they wouldnt touch it.

Best fruit-fly trap is to put some overripe fruit in a small glass container, then cover it tightly with plastic wrap.  Poke some small holes in the plastic wrap.  The fruit flies will be attracted to the CO2 and aldehydes being given off by the rotting fruit, and they won't fly back out.  After a few days, cover with another layer of plastic wrap and freeze to kill.


Thanks.  Saw something along those lines while on the Googles a minute ago.

I think they're attracted by empty beer bottles (I rinse them, but maybe not well enough).  After and during the first freeze I throw the doors open for a while to kill all the insects for the season, but there's a ways to go until then, so it's time to do some trapping.

My Google search even yielded a couple of catch and release traps.  WTF?
 
2013-08-30 11:09:15 PM

the_sidewinder: ArcadianRefugee: ////I'll settle for bacterium just out of curiosity

Why wine goes sour (and where most of the vinegar comes from)
During fermentation, activity by yeast cells naturally produces a small amount of acetic acid. If the wine is exposed to oxygen, Acetobacter bacteria will convert the ethanol into acetic acid.


But that's makes vinegar the waste product (as opposed to the food), no?

GungFu: [www.bubblews.com image 605x640]


So, in days past, all those foodstuffs that were salted to preserve them - you know, so bacteria wouldn't eat them - people shouldn't have eaten them?

Day 180.... Ooooo. You know how long a jar of pickles will keep? Pickled anything, for that matter?
 
2013-08-30 11:12:49 PM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t

/how bad could it get?


I'm sorry I already won this bet once in the past. It's bee spit and vomit.
 
2013-08-30 11:12:55 PM
Peanut butter on toast with banana nickels drizzled with honey with a cup of Guatemalan Gold coffee. Breakfast of champions.
 
2013-08-30 11:13:22 PM

ArcadianRefugee: But that's makes vinegar the waste product (as opposed to the food), no?


Yes, but you listed alcohol as one of the compounds to find an example of something some life form could subsist off of, and it's the easiest one for me to find something that eats it.
 
2013-08-30 11:14:30 PM

Finger51: . I like the tumbler because then you can see all the little bastards at the bottom. few drops of dish soap and any kind of vinegar.


I'm going down there tonight to knock a few back (full bar and TV) and I'm bringing my malted vinegar, dish soap and 20 oz cup down with me.

This ends now.

/ steeples fingers
// it appears the worm has turned...
 
2013-08-30 11:16:20 PM
Let's be more accepting of bee vomit. Recall that alcohol is yeast pee. Also recall the BJ & swallow thread from earlier today. I think I'll be less revolted by what my dog puts in his mouth. Not sure if he likes escargot. Must hide some in the kibbles.
 
2013-08-30 11:18:13 PM

DubtodaIll: Ginger snaps never go bad, they actually get better.


Ginger Snap?

www.comicbookreligion.com
 
2013-08-30 11:18:21 PM

scubamage: dittybopper: Because it's sugar.  Sugar doesn't go bad.

What do I nguyen?

RogermcAllen: Cerebral Knievel: Because its almost pure sucrose and no bacteria can live in its environment.

You can pickle things with sugar as well as salt.

No it isn't.  It is almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1.

downstairs: Sugar doesn't go bad.

It is good to see people are finally starting to realize that glucose and fructose are sugars just like sucrose.


There are a few factors as to why honey doesn't spoil.
1.  Honey has such a high solids level that microbes (with the exception of a few hardcore yeasts that don't actually spoil the honey) can't grow in it
2.  Honey is very thick.  It is literally difficult for molecules to move around and undergo chemical reactions.  Things like oxidation can't happen when oxygen molecules can't make their way into the honey
3.  Bee spit has anti-microbials

No chemical spoilage and no microbial spoilage = stable product

/HFCS is also almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1

Honey contains trace amounts of peroxide which inhibits microbial growth (guess that's what you meant by anti-microbials). That's why it could be put on wounds to dress them (stops infection, or adds flavor for bears, either way...).

It's amazing stuff. Behold the power of waggle dance.


---Copied and pasted from another post here that I replied to, but I wanted to make sure you saw this:

It's actually because it has a super low moisture content.  17-18%.  Any higher, it would ferment.
The difference between honey other sugars is its acidity. Honey's pH is between 3.26-4.48 which also kills off any bacteria.

/ beekeeper apprentice
// getting a hive this year, to start up in April
 
2013-08-30 11:24:16 PM

foo monkey: io9 is pretty much a site written by morons that keeps getting Fark greenlights.


"Amina Harris, executive director of the Honey and Pollination Center at the Robert Mondavi Institute at Univeristy of California, Davis..."

i.imgur.com
 
2013-08-30 11:27:07 PM

santadog: scubamage: dittybopper: Because it's sugar.  Sugar doesn't go bad.

What do I nguyen?

RogermcAllen: Cerebral Knievel: Because its almost pure sucrose and no bacteria can live in its environment.

You can pickle things with sugar as well as salt.

No it isn't.  It is almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1.

downstairs: Sugar doesn't go bad.

It is good to see people are finally starting to realize that glucose and fructose are sugars just like sucrose.

There are a few factors as to why honey doesn't spoil.
1.  Honey has such a high solids level that microbes (with the exception of a few hardcore yeasts that don't actually spoil the honey) can't grow in it
2.  Honey is very thick.  It is literally difficult for molecules to move around and undergo chemical reactions.  Things like oxidation can't happen when oxygen molecules can't make their way into the honey
3.  Bee spit has anti-microbials

No chemical spoilage and no microbial spoilage = stable product

/HFCS is also almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1

Honey contains trace amounts of peroxide which inhibits microbial growth (guess that's what you meant by anti-microbials). That's why it could be put on wounds to dress them (stops infection, or adds flavor for bears, either way...).

It's amazing stuff. Behold the power of waggle dance.

---Copied and pasted from another post here that I replied to, but I wanted to make sure you saw this:

It's actually because it has a super low moisture content.  17-18%.  Any higher, it would ferment.
The difference between honey other sugars is its acidity. Honey's pH is between 3.26-4.48 which also kills off any bacteria.

/ beekeeper apprentice
// getting a hive this year, to start up in April


It can have multiple properties that prevent spoilage. Acidity, low moisture, containing not only hydrogen peroxide but also glucose oxidase, methylglyoxal, bee defensin-1 (seriously, that's what it's called), among other things.

I'm a homebrewer and have a long business relationship with a master apiarist who supplies several meaderies, is referred to by several local universities, and leads our area's beekeeper society. He says it contains hydrogen peroxide, as do several textbooks. That link is one of the papers he shared with me.

Ask your mentor about the impossibility of "organic" honey existing today, it's heartbreaking.
 
2013-08-30 11:28:00 PM
Damn... trolling is easy sometimes :)
 
2013-08-30 11:29:21 PM

ArcadianRefugee: Hollie Maea: Less known is that sago

/fixed


Yeah, you got me there. Appropriately enough, the tastiest sago I've had was with peanut butter and honey on it.
 
2013-08-30 11:34:11 PM
I find adding water and a small amount of yeast to honey helps to enhance the flavors over time.
What do you mead?
 
2013-08-30 11:37:02 PM

scubamage: santadog: scubamage: dittybopper: Because it's sugar.  Sugar doesn't go bad.

What do I nguyen?

RogermcAllen: Cerebral Knievel: Because its almost pure sucrose and no bacteria can live in its environment.

You can pickle things with sugar as well as salt.

No it isn't.  It is almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1.

downstairs: Sugar doesn't go bad.

It is good to see people are finally starting to realize that glucose and fructose are sugars just like sucrose.

There are a few factors as to why honey doesn't spoil.
1.  Honey has such a high solids level that microbes (with the exception of a few hardcore yeasts that don't actually spoil the honey) can't grow in it
2.  Honey is very thick.  It is literally difficult for molecules to move around and undergo chemical reactions.  Things like oxidation can't happen when oxygen molecules can't make their way into the honey
3.  Bee spit has anti-microbials

No chemical spoilage and no microbial spoilage = stable product

/HFCS is also almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1

Honey contains trace amounts of peroxide which inhibits microbial growth (guess that's what you meant by anti-microbials). That's why it could be put on wounds to dress them (stops infection, or adds flavor for bears, either way...).

It's amazing stuff. Behold the power of waggle dance.

---Copied and pasted from another post here that I replied to, but I wanted to make sure you saw this:

It's actually because it has a super low moisture content.  17-18%.  Any higher, it would ferment.
The difference between honey other sugars is its acidity. Honey's pH is between 3.26-4.48 which also kills off any bacteria.

/ beekeeper apprentice
// getting a hive this year, to start up in April

It can have multiple properties that prevent spoilage. Acidity, low moisture, containing not only hydrogen peroxide but also glucose oxidase, methylglyoxal, bee defensin-1 (seriously, that's what it's called), among other things.


I know that no one can claim organic honey.  A bee's range is up to 10 miles if it's a hard foraging season.  Preferably 5 miles.  One bee harvesting from one flower that has pesticide applied to it, and your honey is contaminated.   So many keepers use treatments for mites, and that is also a contaminate.
A small circle of beekeepers I know in Ohio (where I grew up) are practicing no chemical keeping.  One is successful after 5 years of losing hives.  Another had 15 hives this past spring, and has been reduced to 2 as of a couple weeks ago.  I'm moving back to Ohio in the spring.  Thus, going full beekeeper.  The only bees I can keep at this altitude (8,000ft in the Rockies) are Mason Bees.  No honey there... but I want to help the pollinators.
I'll be keeping bees to help the bees.  My goal is not to sell honey, but hopefully just get some good hives going just to let them... bee.
 
2013-08-30 11:37:20 PM
Most of the honey you buy isn't real. The EU has banned the sale of honey imported from many parts of Asia, but of U.S. honey is reportedly smuggled from India and China.  Food Safety News that most store-bought honey had no pollen and contained a lot of additives, like flavored corn syrup and sometimes lead and antibiotics.

//You're welcome :(
 
2013-08-30 11:40:10 PM

KimNorth: Most of the honey you buy isn't real. The EU has banned the sale of honey imported from many parts of Asia, but of U.S. honey is reportedly smuggled from India and China.  Food Safety News that most store-bought honey had no pollen and contained a lot of additives, like flavored corn syrup and sometimes lead and antibiotics.

//You're welcome :(


Buy from local beekeepers.
 
2013-08-30 11:40:29 PM

santadog: scubamage: santadog: scubamage: dittybopper: Because it's sugar.  Sugar doesn't go bad.

What do I nguyen?

RogermcAllen: Cerebral Knievel: Because its almost pure sucrose and no bacteria can live in its environment.

You can pickle things with sugar as well as salt.

No it isn't.  It is almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1.

downstairs: Sugar doesn't go bad.

It is good to see people are finally starting to realize that glucose and fructose are sugars just like sucrose.

There are a few factors as to why honey doesn't spoil.
1.  Honey has such a high solids level that microbes (with the exception of a few hardcore yeasts that don't actually spoil the honey) can't grow in it
2.  Honey is very thick.  It is literally difficult for molecules to move around and undergo chemical reactions.  Things like oxidation can't happen when oxygen molecules can't make their way into the honey
3.  Bee spit has anti-microbials

No chemical spoilage and no microbial spoilage = stable product

/HFCS is also almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1

Honey contains trace amounts of peroxide which inhibits microbial growth (guess that's what you meant by anti-microbials). That's why it could be put on wounds to dress them (stops infection, or adds flavor for bears, either way...).

It's amazing stuff. Behold the power of waggle dance.

---Copied and pasted from another post here that I replied to, but I wanted to make sure you saw this:

It's actually because it has a super low moisture content.  17-18%.  Any higher, it would ferment.
The difference between honey other sugars is its acidity. Honey's pH is between 3.26-4.48 which also kills off any bacteria.

/ beekeeper apprentice
// getting a hive this year, to start up in April

It can have multiple properties that prevent spoilage. Acidity, low moisture, containing not only hydrogen peroxide but also glucose oxidase, methylglyoxal, bee defensin-1 (seriously, that's what it's called), among other things.

I kn ...


Keep it up! The world needs more apiarists, especially right now. Plus, do we really want to live in a world with more politicians and lawyers than apiarists and butchers? I think not. :)
 
2013-08-30 11:40:47 PM
Hooray for honey!
 
433 [TotalFark]
2013-08-30 11:40:50 PM

santadog: I know that no one can claim organic honey.


what a buzz kill.
 
2013-08-30 11:43:59 PM

scubamage: Gyrfalcon: stamped human bacon: PacManDreaming: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t puke

FTFY

It's closer to chewing something up and spitting it out as it never goes into the bee's digestive stomach.

/my $.02

The more I learn about honey, the less I WANT TO KNOW, THANK YOU VERY MUCH.

Have I got something to tell you about milk...


Too funny.

/I wasn't technically correct in saying "never".  The bee can consume the honey if it so desires.
 
433 [TotalFark]
2013-08-30 11:44:36 PM

KimNorth: Food Safety News that most store-bought honey had no pollen and contained a lot of additives, like flavored corn syrup and sometimes lead and antibiotics.


WTF are antibiotics doing in honey?  Above all, how is that not already a lawsuit and a half, if corn syrup isn't listed as ingredient?  Well, oh well.
 
2013-08-30 11:48:49 PM

433: Above all, how is that not already a lawsuit and a half, if corn syrup isn't listed as ingredient?


This is America.  It is important for things to be cheap.
 
2013-08-30 11:52:19 PM
Just a word of extreme caution out there; NEVER EVER feed anyone six months or younger any honey! Honey is also a breeding ground for a certain type of spore that can totally mess up the undeveloped digestive system of a baby (human or animal).
 
2013-08-30 11:52:54 PM

stamped human bacon: scubamage: Gyrfalcon: stamped human bacon: PacManDreaming: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t puke

FTFY

It's closer to chewing something up and spitting it out as it never goes into the bee's digestive stomach.

/my $.02

The more I learn about honey, the less I WANT TO KNOW, THANK YOU VERY MUCH.

Have I got something to tell you about milk...

Too funny.

/I wasn't technically correct in saying "never".  The bee can consume the honey if it so desires.


Technically, honey is the bees food, and they desire it all the time.  It's what they live off of.  If a greedy keeper takes too much honey in the fall, the hive will starve.   Some will winter feed their hives with sugar water, but I believe that to be completely insane.   Bees make the perfect food for themselves, so lets replace that with sugar water.  I feel the same about feeding humming birds sugar water.
 
433 [TotalFark]
2013-08-30 11:55:29 PM

Hollie Maea: This is America. It is important for things to be cheap.


I like my nicest things to be on shelves, nicer things to be affordable, nice things, inexpensive.  Unfortunately, that is not the way things are for now, and that is I cannot have nice things.,, because then everyone would have them, and I would feel cheap. ;)
 
2013-08-30 11:55:36 PM

scubamage: santadog: scubamage: santadog: scubamage: dittybopper: Because it's sugar.  Sugar doesn't go bad.

What do I nguyen?

RogermcAllen: Cerebral Knievel: Because its almost pure sucrose and no bacteria can live in its environment.

You can pickle things with sugar as well as salt.

No it isn't.  It is almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1.

downstairs: Sugar doesn't go bad.

It is good to see people are finally starting to realize that glucose and fructose are sugars just like sucrose.

There are a few factors as to why honey doesn't spoil.
1.  Honey has such a high solids level that microbes (with the exception of a few hardcore yeasts that don't actually spoil the honey) can't grow in it
2.  Honey is very thick.  It is literally difficult for molecules to move around and undergo chemical reactions.  Things like oxidation can't happen when oxygen molecules can't make their way into the honey
3.  Bee spit has anti-microbials

No chemical spoilage and no microbial spoilage = stable product

/HFCS is also almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1

Honey contains trace amounts of peroxide which inhibits microbial growth (guess that's what you meant by anti-microbials). That's why it could be put on wounds to dress them (stops infection, or adds flavor for bears, either way...).

It's amazing stuff. Behold the power of waggle dance.

---Copied and pasted from another post here that I replied to, but I wanted to make sure you saw this:

It's actually because it has a super low moisture content.  17-18%.  Any higher, it would ferment.
The difference between honey other sugars is its acidity. Honey's pH is between 3.26-4.48 which also kills off any bacteria.

/ beekeeper apprentice
// getting a hive this year, to start up in April

It can have multiple properties that prevent spoilage. Acidity, low moisture, containing not only hydrogen peroxide but also glucose oxidase, methylglyoxal, bee defensin-1 (seriously, that's what it's called), among other thi ..


Funny you should say that.  I'll also be raising chickens and meat rabbits.  :)  Going back to my farm roots.
 
2013-08-30 11:57:08 PM
www.metro.us
 
2013-08-31 12:11:49 AM

Skyfrog: theorellior: Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.

I've had peanut butter and syrup sandwiches with chili but I've never tried peanut butter and honey. I'm intrigued by the idea.


Are you kidding me?  Peanut butter and honey sandwiches are the best!  Followed only by peanut butter and banana sandwiches and peanut butter and bacon sandwiches.  Mix and match to your personal taste.  Food fit for a King.
 
2013-08-31 12:14:11 AM
santadog:Technically, honey is the bees food, and they desire it all the time.  It's what they live off of.  If a greedy keeper takes too much honey in the fall, the hive will starve.   Some will winter feed their hives with sugar water, but I believe that to be completely insane.   Bees make the perfect food for themselves, so lets replace that with sugar water.  I feel the same about feeding humming birds sugar water.

The thing with birds is, they don't rely solely on manmade bird feeders. If they find a safe feeder, they'll add it to their mental lists of places with food. Hummingbirds will take supplemental nutrition from their feeders, just as sparrows and woodpeckers will take seeds and suet from theirs. The extra calories are certainly not replacing the local flora and insect life, and if the feeders went away, they'd survive. We'd just see less of them.

Not really a fair comparison, in other words.
 
2013-08-31 12:14:31 AM

42_42_42: From the article:

But honey crystallizes most quickly at temperatures of between 50 and 59 °F. So, if you want to avoid having to heat your honey to remove crystals (apparently slow, indirect heat is best for that, by the way), avoid the refrigerator.

Who the fark is keeping their refrigerator this warm?



The British?
 
2013-08-31 12:16:32 AM

ciberido: Skyfrog: theorellior: Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.

I've had peanut butter and syrup sandwiches with chili but I've never tried peanut butter and honey. I'm intrigued by the idea.

Are you kidding me?  Peanut butter and honey sandwiches are the best!  Followed only by peanut butter and banana sandwiches and peanut butter and bacon sandwiches.  Mix and match to your personal taste.  Food fit for a King.


Peanut butter and honey sandwiches are best with creamed honey, and butter on the bread. Good crusty, white bread.
 
2013-08-31 12:20:26 AM

ciberido: 42_42_42: From the article:

But honey crystallizes most quickly at temperatures of between 50 and 59 °F. So, if you want to avoid having to heat your honey to remove crystals (apparently slow, indirect heat is best for that, by the way), avoid the refrigerator.

Who the fark is keeping their refrigerator this warm?


The British?


Why would that be?
 
2013-08-31 12:22:46 AM

Spiralmonkey: ciberido: 42_42_42: From the article:

But honey crystallizes most quickly at temperatures of between 50 and 59 °F. So, if you want to avoid having to heat your honey to remove crystals (apparently slow, indirect heat is best for that, by the way), avoid the refrigerator.

Who the fark is keeping their refrigerator this warm?


The British?

Why would that be?


So their beer doesn't get too cold?
 
2013-08-31 12:33:26 AM

whatshisname: Peanut butter and honey sandwiches are best with creamed honey, and butter on the bread. Good crusty, white bread.


OH HELL YES THIS^^^^

/loves me some PB & H
 
2013-08-31 12:33:41 AM

Skyfrog: theorellior: Canton: theorellior: There's also a protein in the sugary bee barf that emits small amounts of hydrogen peroxide if it does get wet.

Interesting? Is that why honey tastes so unpleasant?

YMMV, my friend. Just means more sugary bee barf for me.

Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.

I've had peanut butter and syrup sandwiches with chili but I've never tried peanut butter and honey. I'm intrigued by the idea.


That was a classic in our family. Midwestern thing maybe.
 
2013-08-31 12:36:52 AM
Tablespoon of LOCAL raw honey is good for pollen allergies (hay fever)
 
2013-08-31 12:37:30 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: whatshisname: Peanut butter and honey sandwiches are best with creamed honey, and butter on the bread. Good crusty, white bread.

OH HELL YES THIS^^^^

/loves me some PB & H


buttered bread is key
it keeps the pb lubricated so it doesn't stick to your mouth while adding a creamy cool salty element.
 
2013-08-31 12:38:26 AM

Canton: santadog:Technically, honey is the bees food, and they desire it all the time.  It's what they live off of.  If a greedy keeper takes too much honey in the fall, the hive will starve.   Some will winter feed their hives with sugar water, but I believe that to be completely insane.   Bees make the perfect food for themselves, so lets replace that with sugar water.  I feel the same about feeding humming birds sugar water.

The thing with birds is, they don't rely solely on manmade bird feeders. If they find a safe feeder, they'll add it to their mental lists of places with food. Hummingbirds will take supplemental nutrition from their feeders, just as sparrows and woodpeckers will take seeds and suet from theirs. The extra calories are certainly not replacing the local flora and insect life, and if the feeders went away, they'd survive. We'd just see less of them.

Not really a fair comparison, in other words.


Sugar and water is not a fair description of supplemental nutrition.
 
2013-08-31 12:39:40 AM

Vangor: I find adding water and a small amount of yeast to honey helps to enhance the flavors over time.


What mead you think of that?
 
2013-08-31 12:40:59 AM

Popular Opinion: MaudlinMutantMollusk: whatshisname: Peanut butter and honey sandwiches are best with creamed honey, and butter on the bread. Good crusty, white bread.

OH HELL YES THIS^^^^

/loves me some PB & H

buttered bread is key
it keeps the pb lubricated so it doesn't stick to your mouth while adding a creamy cool salty element.


Exactly

/gourmet PB & H, FTW
 
2013-08-31 12:46:41 AM
And Marmite. And honey and Marmite together are farking awesome!!!
 
2013-08-31 12:52:44 AM

Skyfrog: theorellior: Canton: theorellior: There's also a protein in the sugary bee barf that emits small amounts of hydrogen peroxide if it does get wet.

Interesting? Is that why honey tastes so unpleasant?

YMMV, my friend. Just means more sugary bee barf for me.

Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.

I've had peanut butter and syrup sandwiches with chili but I've never tried peanut butter and honey. I'm intrigued by the idea.


I drizzle honey over peanut-buttered toast.  Warm gooey goodness.
 
2013-08-31 12:55:34 AM

Abox: [www.badassoftheweek.com image 408x304]
/don't care
//don't give a shiat


The honey badger maims, he does not kill.
 
2013-08-31 01:28:26 AM

whatshisname: ciberido: Skyfrog: theorellior: Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.

I've had peanut butter and syrup sandwiches with chili but I've never tried peanut butter and honey. I'm intrigued by the idea.

Are you kidding me?  Peanut butter and honey sandwiches are the best!  Followed only by peanut butter and banana sandwiches and peanut butter and bacon sandwiches.  Mix and match to your personal taste.  Food fit for a King.

Peanut butter and honey sandwiches are best with creamed honey, and butter on the bread. Good crusty, white bread.


I discovered this as a kid. Make a peanut butter and honey sandwich. Place the sandwich on a paper towel with the honey side down. Stick in the freezer. I'm not sure what it does, maybe it's the honey mixing with the bread yeast, but you will not believe the flavor. Idea isn't to really freeze it, but let the honey soak in the bread a little then stick it in for 20 minutes or so. It's hard to wait, but it'll just taste like cold honey if you don't. Anyone know the food science behind this? I've been doing it over 40 years now.
 
2013-08-31 01:41:57 AM

kabar: I've recently wondered if humus ever goes bad.  It doesn't seem to.


Well, being as humus is dirt, it's unlikely to.

But yes, hummus will go bad. Especially if it has no preservatives.
 
2013-08-31 01:43:31 AM

KarmicDisaster: Because nothing grows in poop.


Where are people getting this??
I've heard this for years.

It's bee VOMIT.

thegospelcoalition.org
 
2013-08-31 03:19:38 AM

LordOfThePings: [Red Dwarf image 480x360]

When it goes off, it tastes exactly the same as when it's fresh.


I love you, man.
 
2013-08-31 04:29:30 AM

Canton: MrHappyRotter: TomD9938: I've got a Fruit Fly population in my garage / shop that is growing increasingly annoying.

Recently I tried making a trap by drizzling some honey onto a paper plate, expecting that the next morning a bunch of the little bastards would be caught up in it like a herd of Mastodons in a tar pit.

As it happens, not one farking fly in two days and nights.  TFA says that honey is fairly acidic, so maybe that's why they wouldnt touch it.

Fruit flies are attracted to vinegar.  Take notes.  No need to thank me later.

Wow. I seriously thought you were making a honey/vinegar joke, but apparently you were not.

Maybe vinegar used as bait in a homemade flytrap would solve the fruit fly problem...


Try tequila in a shot glass half covered with a playing card... did that today. Tricky part is to start with a clean glass, otherwise they hang out on the rim.
 
2013-08-31 04:35:49 AM

TomD9938: FrancoFile: TomD9938: I've got a Fruit Fly population in my garage / shop that is growing increasingly annoying.

Recently I tried making a trap by drizzling some honey onto a paper plate, expecting that the next morning a bunch of the little bastards would be caught up in it like a herd of Mastodons in a tar pit.

As it happens, not one farking fly in two days and nights.  TFA says that honey is fairly acidic, so maybe that's why they wouldnt touch it.

Best fruit-fly trap is to put some overripe fruit in a small glass container, then cover it tightly with plastic wrap.  Poke some small holes in the plastic wrap.  The fruit flies will be attracted to the CO2 and aldehydes being given off by the rotting fruit, and they won't fly back out.  After a few days, cover with another layer of plastic wrap and freeze to kill.

Thanks.  Saw something along those lines while on the Googles a minute ago.

I think they're attracted by empty beer bottles (I rinse them, but maybe not well enough).  After and during the first freeze I throw the doors open for a while to kill all the insects for the season, but there's a ways to go until then, so it's time to do some trapping.

My Google search even yielded a couple of catch and release traps.  WTF?


There's a related podcast/episode of CBC Radio's "Quirks and Quarks" science show.  Apparently fruit flies have highly sensitive receptors for the scent of ethanol, followed by minor receptors for the scent of yeast itself.

My solution is similar to ones already posted - pour some vinegar (apple cider works the best) or cheap wine into a glass, cover with plastic wrap, poke 1 or 2 smallish holes in the centre (with a fork or a round toothpick), place it close to your fermenting liquid and wait.  The principle as with the other taps is that the flies will crawl in via the centre holes, but will always try to crawl out along the edge, which is sealed.  They tire out and drown.

(Fun fact:  if you distill your brew for education purposes, the fruit flies are more attracted to the ethanol coming out of your distiller than they are to any vinegar or wine in your trap.  In this case, you have to sacrifice some of your fresh distillate and use it in the trap instead of the vinegar/wine.  Works the same way.)
 
2013-08-31 05:03:29 AM
BUT WHAT ABOUT WHEN TEH HONAE TARNS WIET !?!?1/11//?!?!? DAAAAEEEERRRRRPPPPP-DERP-DERP-DERP-DERP-DERP !!!!1!

........Sugar crystallizes, dumbass. That doesn't mean.... wait, cry-stal-lize... oh shiat. Longer than two syllables. You'll never get it..... but that won't stop you from ranting.
 
2013-08-31 06:38:58 AM

RogermcAllen: Cerebral Knievel: Because its almost pure sucrose and no bacteria can live in its environment.

You can pickle things with sugar as well as salt.

No it isn't.  It is almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1.


Funny, that sounds a lot like sucrose to me.

downstairs: Sugar doesn't go bad.

It is good to see people are finally starting to realize that glucose and fructose are sugars just like sucrose.


Well, not just like. They're monosaccharides, while sucrose is a disaccharide made of glucose and fructose.

There are a few factors as to why honey doesn't spoil.
1.  Honey has such a high solids level that microbes (with the exception of a few hardcore yeasts that don't actually spoil the honey) can't grow in it
2.  Honey is very thick.  It is literally difficult for molecules to move around and undergo chemical reactions.  Things like oxidation can't happen when oxygen molecules can't make their way into the honey
3.  Bee spit has anti-microbials

No chemical spoilage and no microbial spoilage = stable product

/HFCS is also almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1


No it isn't. What do you think the HF stands for?
 
2013-08-31 06:46:16 AM
The thread is TL;DR but the article mentioned Hydrogen Peroxide and its worthless use as a treatment for minor wounds.  It does have a good use:  pour some in an ear blocked by wax.  Guaranteed it will melt that wax within a couple of hours
 
2013-08-31 06:56:09 AM

GungFu: /currently eating oats that were in its unopened plastic packaging - bought over 3 years ago; still tastes yummy!


Shows a grave lack of knowledge.
 
2013-08-31 07:11:40 AM

TomD9938: I've got a Fruit Fly population in my garage / shop that is growing increasingly annoying.

Recently I tried making a trap by drizzling some honey onto a paper plate, expecting that the next morning a bunch of the little bastards would be caught up in it like a herd of Mastodons in a tar pit.

As it happens, not one farking fly in two days and nights.  TFA says that honey is fairly acidic, so maybe that's why they wouldnt touch it.


Had a fruit fly. problem once. take a liter bottle and pour in a bitof juice or fruit then make a paper cone with a very small hole at the tip and tape to the mouthe of the bottle cone tip pointing into thr mouth. makeshift trap they fly in but not out. works wonders
 
2013-08-31 07:33:33 AM

TopoGigo: RogermcAllen: Cerebral Knievel: Because its almost pure sucrose and no bacteria can live in its environment.

You can pickle things with sugar as well as salt.

No it isn't.  It is almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1.

Funny, that sounds a lot like sucrose to me.

downstairs: Sugar doesn't go bad.

It is good to see people are finally starting to realize that glucose and fructose are sugars just like sucrose.

Well, not just like. They're monosaccharides, while sucrose is a disaccharide made of glucose and fructose.

There are a few factors as to why honey doesn't spoil.
1.  Honey has such a high solids level that microbes (with the exception of a few hardcore yeasts that don't actually spoil the honey) can't grow in it
2.  Honey is very thick.  It is literally difficult for molecules to move around and undergo chemical reactions.  Things like oxidation can't happen when oxygen molecules can't make their way into the honey
3.  Bee spit has anti-microbials

No chemical spoilage and no microbial spoilage = stable product

/HFCS is also almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1

No it isn't. What do you think the HF stands for?


Yes, it is.  "High fructose" means that the fructose level is higher than it is in corn syrup that hasn't been processed to raise the fructose level.  The typical ratios aren't quite 1:1, but they're close.
 
2013-08-31 09:03:07 AM

pyrotek85: Skyfrog:I've had peanut butter and syrup sandwiches with chili but I've never tried peanut butter and honey. I'm intrigued by the idea.

Peanut butter and honey sandwiches are great, I always preferred it over using jelly.


Peanut butter and honey sandwiched between 2 Eggo waffles. The waffles help catch any drips.
 
2013-08-31 09:06:30 AM
Honey is a vile, disgusting substance, and I'm glad so many of you like it, because that means that you will neatly deplete any excess supply, saving the rest of us from the horrors of being force-fed that sticky crap in government-controlled chain gang honey camps.
 
2013-08-31 09:45:32 AM

the_sidewinder: ArcadianRefugee: But that's makes vinegar the waste product (as opposed to the food), no?

Yes, but you listed alcohol as one of the compounds to find an example of something some life form could subsist off of, and it's the easiest one for me to find something that eats it.


Oh. Duh.

/thx
 
2013-08-31 10:09:56 AM
Like someone mentioned up thread, adding water, yeast, and fruit to make mead is the way to go.  I started making my own this summer and have had great success so far and its delicious.

If you want to give it a try, search for Joe's Ancient Orange Spiced Mead, or JAOM for short.  Its pretty much fool proof and finishes fast compared to other recipes.  I have my second 6 gallon batch going now and have completed a Peach/Ginger and Apricot/Ginger with a Strawberry in secondary fermentation now.  I use local honey and all the fruits were hand picked from a farm 5 miles away from me.  Support local and fresh!
 
2013-08-31 10:17:31 AM

freak7: This information bodes well for that pack of KFC honey from 1987 that I've been holding onto.


Technically, that's Honey Sauce.
 
2013-08-31 10:18:28 AM
The real question is why doesn't Tupelo honey crystallize?
 
2013-08-31 10:27:06 AM
Acacia honey is the best I've ever tasted. Got some right out the boiler from a travelling group of keepers here in Korea - it's only available for a short time and costs about 20 bucks a kilo - tasted like old school 1980s grape bubble gum.
 
2013-08-31 11:15:19 AM

BigLuca: Skyfrog: theorellior: Canton: theorellior: There's also a protein in the sugary bee barf that emits small amounts of hydrogen peroxide if it does get wet.

Interesting? Is that why honey tastes so unpleasant?

YMMV, my friend. Just means more sugary bee barf for me.

Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.

I've had peanut butter and syrup sandwiches with chili but I've never tried peanut butter and honey. I'm intrigued by the idea.

It's really good.  When I'm on a diet and need a low-cal snack, I just mix up a bowl of peanut butter and honey and that does the trick.  If the peanut butter jar is more than 1/3 gone I just pour the honey right in and eat it with a malt spoon. Or drizzle it over a block of cream cheese.


LOL. You're mixing an oily legume puree and pure sugar together, I don't think that's "low-cal".
 
2013-08-31 11:51:05 AM

kabar: CowardlyLion: GungFu: [www.bubblews.com image 605x640]

morgan spurlock is a farking idiotic, science-hating coont. That is the politest true statement I can say about him.

/covering something in salt will help prevent microbial growth
//as will adding chemical preservatives

Wasn't that the entire point of the demonstration?


It seems weird, even for morgan spurlock, to go out of his way to publicly demonstrate that he's a science-hating coont.
 
2013-08-31 12:03:38 PM

theorellior: BigLuca: Skyfrog: theorellior: Canton: theorellior: There's also a protein in the sugary bee barf that emits small amounts of hydrogen peroxide if it does get wet.

Interesting? Is that why honey tastes so unpleasant?

YMMV, my friend. Just means more sugary bee barf for me.

Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.

I've had peanut butter and syrup sandwiches with chili but I've never tried peanut butter and honey. I'm intrigued by the idea.

It's really good.  When I'm on a diet and need a low-cal snack, I just mix up a bowl of peanut butter and honey and that does the trick.  If the peanut butter jar is more than 1/3 gone I just pour the honey right in and eat it with a malt spoon. Or drizzle it over a block of cream cheese.

LOL. You're mixing an oily legume puree and pure sugar together, I don't think that's "low-cal".


Well, honey's only about 50 calories per tablespoon and peanut butter's about 100 per tablespoon, so if you just have a small blob of each, it's only ~150 calories.

/it could be low-cal if you just consume very small portions
//still calorically-dense as all hell, though
///and delicious
 
2013-08-31 12:25:26 PM

PainfulItching: Just remember, a lot of what you buy as honey isn't real honey. Corn syrup everywhere. If you get a local supplier or from a farmer's market or the like, all the better.

The stay fresh rule does not apply if the honeycomb is included, IIRC.


Uh...nope. Makes no difference if honey is in comb form, as long as it is sealed away from moisture. Honey in the comb may granulate, just as the extracted/bottled version, but it is still perfectly good honey.
 
2013-08-31 12:44:35 PM

wb1gjk: PainfulItching: Just remember, a lot of what you buy as honey isn't real honey. Corn syrup everywhere. If you get a local supplier or from a farmer's market or the like, all the better.

The stay fresh rule does not apply if the honeycomb is included, IIRC.

Uh...nope. Makes no difference if honey is in comb form, as long as it is sealed away from moisture. Honey in the comb may granulate, just as the extracted/bottled version, but it is still perfectly good honey.


Yeah, the most significant difference between honey in comb form and liquid form is storage.  You can store liquid honey in small containers, but you need much more space to store comb, because honeycomb's big.  Yeah yeah yeah.  It's not small.  No no no.
 
2013-08-31 01:18:01 PM

whatsYOURname: Peanut butter on toast with banana nickels drizzled with honey with a cup of Guatemalan Gold coffee. Breakfast of champions.


I read that as "banana knuckles" and was quite confused. I presume you mean slices of banana, banana medallions.
 
2013-08-31 02:58:27 PM
I love how aside from his incredibly confused description of crystallization, the author couldn't decide between hygroscopic and hydroscopic. Why do random collections of hastily Googled facts get greenlights on Fark? This content farm shiat is all over the net.
 
2013-08-31 03:08:48 PM

Mister Peejay: Honey is a vile, disgusting substance, and I'm glad so many of you like it, because that means that you will neatly deplete any excess supply, saving the rest of us from the horrors of being force-fed that sticky crap in government-controlled chain gang honey camps.


Why am I picturing Garak from Deep Space Nine, the first time he had root beer?
 
2013-08-31 03:16:15 PM

FloydA: wb1gjk: PainfulItching: Just remember, a lot of what you buy as honey isn't real honey. Corn syrup everywhere. If you get a local supplier or from a farmer's market or the like, all the better.

The stay fresh rule does not apply if the honeycomb is included, IIRC.

Uh...nope. Makes no difference if honey is in comb form, as long as it is sealed away from moisture. Honey in the comb may granulate, just as the extracted/bottled version, but it is still perfectly good honey.

Yeah, the most significant difference between honey in comb form and liquid form is storage.  You can store liquid honey in small containers, but you need much more space to store comb, because honeycomb's big.  Yeah yeah yeah.  It's not small.  No no no.


That was a long way to go for that joke. Having said that, you might be a genius.

/would lol again
 
2013-08-31 03:37:45 PM

foxyshadis: I love how aside from his incredibly confused description of crystallization, the author couldn't decide between hygroscopic and hydroscopic. Why do random collections of hastily Googled facts get greenlights on Fark? This content farm shiat is all over the net.


Hydroscopic is a lot like irregardless in that it isn't a real word.  If someone uses either word you can immediately stop listening to them because they obviously have no idea what they are talking about, and are most likely trying to impress you with how "smart" they are.
 
2013-08-31 04:26:02 PM

0z79: BUT WHAT ABOUT WHEN TEH HONAE TARNS WIET !?!?1/11//?!?!? DAAAAEEEERRRRRPPPPP-DERP-DERP-DERP-DERP-DERP !!!!1!

........Sugar crystallizes, dumbass. That doesn't mean.... wait, cry-stal-lize... oh shiat. Longer than two syllables. You'll never get it..... but that won't stop you from ranting.


I have no clue who you are so absolutely, insanely furious with.  But this is covered in the article, and water != crystallisation. You're so outraged that I really don't know what you're foaming at the mouth about, but the article states this quite clearly:

"The fact that honey is hydroscopic means that it has little water in its natural state but can easily suck in water if its exposed to it. If it does that, it could spoil. So the final key to honey remaining unspoiled is making sure it's well sealed and stored in a dry place. "
 
2013-08-31 04:39:56 PM
So I tried a few of the fruit fly traps last night to get rid of the buggers that rode in on some organic bananas a couple of weeks ago.

Results:
Orange peel in a glass covered in saran wrap with holes in the centre = 2 live flies.
Vinegar+2 drops dishwashing liquid in a glass covered in saran wrap with holes in the centre = 5 dead floating flies.
Vinegar+2 drops dishwashing liquid in an uncovered glass = 8 dead floating flies.

Now if I can just find some way to trap all the tigers in the house I might be able to leave the bedroom someday.
 
2013-08-31 05:16:05 PM
For the person who asked about maple syrup, it gets mold on it unless it's refrigerated It also has a higher water content.
 
2013-09-01 12:23:58 AM

Max Awesome: Vinegar+2 drops dishwashing liquid in a glass covered in saran wrap with holes in the centre = 5 dead floating flies.
Vinegar+2 drops dishwashing liquid in an uncovered glass = 8 dead floating flies.


I did both of these as well and had similar results.
 
2013-09-01 01:49:46 AM
I think it's the good upbringing. It takes a hive....
 
2013-09-01 02:25:23 AM

SomeoneDumb: Does beef jerkey go bad? I guess it would, but never took the time to find out.


yes, yes it does.  have had the singularly horrific experience of restocking the impulse merchandise in a checkout lane, and doing a double-take at a jack links package whose clear "viewing window" was completely obscured by white fuzz.  i'm guessing somehow the package was never fully sealed, but yeah, i think some of the flavored ones are treated with something that will attract mold/bacteria/whatever that was.
 
2013-09-01 02:48:01 AM
Funny, so many honey snobs in here and not one mention of unpasteurized honey...

Never cared much for honey, but since discovered unpasteurized ... it's like a totally different thing... went through a few bottles in a month's time (with tea and such).. amazing stuff.
 
2013-09-01 07:09:04 AM

dittybopper: Because it's sugar.  Sugar doesn't go bad.

What do I nguyen?


The Domino theory.
 
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