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(io9)   Honey is pretty much the only food that doesn't go bad. Why?   (io9.com) divider line 195
    More: Interesting, hydrogen peroxides, Alexander the Great, lovers, nectars, open wound  
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19073 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Aug 2013 at 9:14 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-30 10:46:24 PM  

Yotto: /home brewer
//one fruit fly can turn 5 gallons of beer into vinegar
///probably the best vinegar you'll ever have but I still would rather have the beer


Five gallons of the best vinegar I ever had would be worth well over one hundred thousand dollars.
/curiously, it is unknown whether bacon will go bad either.
 
2013-08-30 10:46:54 PM  
Wait, you're telling me it's not because it has f**kin magnets in it?
 
2013-08-30 10:51:19 PM  
Does beef jerkey go bad? I guess it would, but never took the time to find out.
 
2013-08-30 10:52:50 PM  

Ablejack: Yotto: /home brewer
//one fruit fly can turn 5 gallons of beer into vinegar
///probably the best vinegar you'll ever have but I still would rather have the beer

Five gallons of the best vinegar I ever had would be worth well over one hundred thousand dollars.
/curiously, it is unknown whether bacon will go bad either.


You know, making good vinegar is surprisingly hard. I actually tried it with several small 1-gallon batches of mead and beer. I did everything "right" (kept it between 5-7% abv, used yeast that would completely dry them out). Added mother, and it did its thing. Almost every single one was so rediculously tart that I couldn't stand it. Like, it hurt to taste.

There's a ton of information about making wine and beer NOT go bad, but there's a strange shortage of information on purposely making wine and beer go bad on purpose.
 
2013-08-30 10:53:56 PM  
Is it because honey don't give a fark?
 
2013-08-30 11:02:04 PM  

Thanks for the Meme-ries: I beg to differ :


dvdmedia.ign.com


camel.ethereal.net
 
2013-08-30 11:03:07 PM  

Gyrfalcon: MrHappyRotter: Gyrfalcon: MrHappyRotter: Gyrfalcon: the_sidewinder: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t

/how bad could it get?

No it isn't

/Bee barf

Right, like that's so much better.

Right, like that's the point.  Or like it matters.

Oh dear god, you're already tightening the sphincter on your sarcasm meter, aren't you? And it's barely Friday night on a long weekend...

What I do with my sphincter on a Friday night is NONE OF YOUR FLUNKING BUSINESS.

Howabout on a Saturday morning?


I'm dying to know; Is it remarkable?
 
2013-08-30 11:03:22 PM  

stamped human bacon: PacManDreaming: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t puke

FTFY

It's closer to chewing something up and spitting it out as it never goes into the bee's digestive stomach.

/my $.02


The more I learn about honey, the less I WANT TO KNOW, THANK YOU VERY MUCH.
 
2013-08-30 11:03:43 PM  

Cerebral Knievel: Because its almost pure sucrose and no bacteria can live in its environment.

You can pickle things with sugar as well as salt.


It's actually because it has a super low moisture content.
The difference between honey other sugars is its acidity. Honey's pH is between 3.26-4.48 which also kills off anything that would harm the honey.

And for "The More You Know"..  bacteria has a hard time at high altitudes because of the lack of moisture.  Living at altitude for 8 years, and I have only gotten sick once, and that was stomach flu.. and I know the child culprit from the front range who gave it to me... bastard.

/ beekeeper apprentice
// getting a hive this year, to start up in April
 
2013-08-30 11:04:42 PM  

Gyrfalcon: stamped human bacon: PacManDreaming: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t puke

FTFY

It's closer to chewing something up and spitting it out as it never goes into the bee's digestive stomach.

/my $.02

The more I learn about honey, the less I WANT TO KNOW, THANK YOU VERY MUCH.


Have I got something to tell you about milk...
 
2013-08-30 11:05:03 PM  
GungFu:

Well, McDs food is processed and cooked, so it tends to drive out most moisture. A fresh watermelon is like 90-95% moisture, as it's mostly water.

Bacteria thrive on moisture.

So...
 
2013-08-30 11:05:06 PM  

CowardlyLion: GungFu: [www.bubblews.com image 605x640]

morgan spurlock is a farking idiotic, science-hating coont. That is the politest true statement I can say about him.

/covering something in salt will help prevent microbial growth
//as will adding chemical preservatives


Wasn't that the entire point of the demonstration?
 
2013-08-30 11:06:36 PM  

KarmicDisaster: Because nothing grows in poop.


Tell that to the magic mushrooms.
 
2013-08-30 11:07:05 PM  

TomD9938: Thanks all, will try it.  I hope they like malted vinegar, cause, you know... that's all I've got in the house at the moment.


and forget about the bottle. just use a coffee cup or tumbler. I like the tumbler because then you can see all the little bastards at the bottom. few drops of dish soap and any kind of vinegar.
 
2013-08-30 11:08:28 PM  

FrancoFile: TomD9938: I've got a Fruit Fly population in my garage / shop that is growing increasingly annoying.

Recently I tried making a trap by drizzling some honey onto a paper plate, expecting that the next morning a bunch of the little bastards would be caught up in it like a herd of Mastodons in a tar pit.

As it happens, not one farking fly in two days and nights.  TFA says that honey is fairly acidic, so maybe that's why they wouldnt touch it.

Best fruit-fly trap is to put some overripe fruit in a small glass container, then cover it tightly with plastic wrap.  Poke some small holes in the plastic wrap.  The fruit flies will be attracted to the CO2 and aldehydes being given off by the rotting fruit, and they won't fly back out.  After a few days, cover with another layer of plastic wrap and freeze to kill.


Thanks.  Saw something along those lines while on the Googles a minute ago.

I think they're attracted by empty beer bottles (I rinse them, but maybe not well enough).  After and during the first freeze I throw the doors open for a while to kill all the insects for the season, but there's a ways to go until then, so it's time to do some trapping.

My Google search even yielded a couple of catch and release traps.  WTF?
 
2013-08-30 11:09:15 PM  

the_sidewinder: ArcadianRefugee: ////I'll settle for bacterium just out of curiosity

Why wine goes sour (and where most of the vinegar comes from)
During fermentation, activity by yeast cells naturally produces a small amount of acetic acid. If the wine is exposed to oxygen, Acetobacter bacteria will convert the ethanol into acetic acid.


But that's makes vinegar the waste product (as opposed to the food), no?

GungFu: [www.bubblews.com image 605x640]


So, in days past, all those foodstuffs that were salted to preserve them - you know, so bacteria wouldn't eat them - people shouldn't have eaten them?

Day 180.... Ooooo. You know how long a jar of pickles will keep? Pickled anything, for that matter?
 
2013-08-30 11:12:49 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t

/how bad could it get?


I'm sorry I already won this bet once in the past. It's bee spit and vomit.
 
2013-08-30 11:12:55 PM  
Peanut butter on toast with banana nickels drizzled with honey with a cup of Guatemalan Gold coffee. Breakfast of champions.
 
2013-08-30 11:13:22 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: But that's makes vinegar the waste product (as opposed to the food), no?


Yes, but you listed alcohol as one of the compounds to find an example of something some life form could subsist off of, and it's the easiest one for me to find something that eats it.
 
2013-08-30 11:14:30 PM  

Finger51: . I like the tumbler because then you can see all the little bastards at the bottom. few drops of dish soap and any kind of vinegar.


I'm going down there tonight to knock a few back (full bar and TV) and I'm bringing my malted vinegar, dish soap and 20 oz cup down with me.

This ends now.

/ steeples fingers
// it appears the worm has turned...
 
2013-08-30 11:16:20 PM  
Let's be more accepting of bee vomit. Recall that alcohol is yeast pee. Also recall the BJ & swallow thread from earlier today. I think I'll be less revolted by what my dog puts in his mouth. Not sure if he likes escargot. Must hide some in the kibbles.
 
2013-08-30 11:18:13 PM  

DubtodaIll: Ginger snaps never go bad, they actually get better.


Ginger Snap?

www.comicbookreligion.com
 
2013-08-30 11:18:21 PM  

scubamage: dittybopper: Because it's sugar.  Sugar doesn't go bad.

What do I nguyen?

RogermcAllen: Cerebral Knievel: Because its almost pure sucrose and no bacteria can live in its environment.

You can pickle things with sugar as well as salt.

No it isn't.  It is almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1.

downstairs: Sugar doesn't go bad.

It is good to see people are finally starting to realize that glucose and fructose are sugars just like sucrose.


There are a few factors as to why honey doesn't spoil.
1.  Honey has such a high solids level that microbes (with the exception of a few hardcore yeasts that don't actually spoil the honey) can't grow in it
2.  Honey is very thick.  It is literally difficult for molecules to move around and undergo chemical reactions.  Things like oxidation can't happen when oxygen molecules can't make their way into the honey
3.  Bee spit has anti-microbials

No chemical spoilage and no microbial spoilage = stable product

/HFCS is also almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1

Honey contains trace amounts of peroxide which inhibits microbial growth (guess that's what you meant by anti-microbials). That's why it could be put on wounds to dress them (stops infection, or adds flavor for bears, either way...).

It's amazing stuff. Behold the power of waggle dance.


---Copied and pasted from another post here that I replied to, but I wanted to make sure you saw this:

It's actually because it has a super low moisture content.  17-18%.  Any higher, it would ferment.
The difference between honey other sugars is its acidity. Honey's pH is between 3.26-4.48 which also kills off any bacteria.

/ beekeeper apprentice
// getting a hive this year, to start up in April
 
2013-08-30 11:24:16 PM  

foo monkey: io9 is pretty much a site written by morons that keeps getting Fark greenlights.


"Amina Harris, executive director of the Honey and Pollination Center at the Robert Mondavi Institute at Univeristy of California, Davis..."

i.imgur.com
 
2013-08-30 11:27:07 PM  

santadog: scubamage: dittybopper: Because it's sugar.  Sugar doesn't go bad.

What do I nguyen?

RogermcAllen: Cerebral Knievel: Because its almost pure sucrose and no bacteria can live in its environment.

You can pickle things with sugar as well as salt.

No it isn't.  It is almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1.

downstairs: Sugar doesn't go bad.

It is good to see people are finally starting to realize that glucose and fructose are sugars just like sucrose.

There are a few factors as to why honey doesn't spoil.
1.  Honey has such a high solids level that microbes (with the exception of a few hardcore yeasts that don't actually spoil the honey) can't grow in it
2.  Honey is very thick.  It is literally difficult for molecules to move around and undergo chemical reactions.  Things like oxidation can't happen when oxygen molecules can't make their way into the honey
3.  Bee spit has anti-microbials

No chemical spoilage and no microbial spoilage = stable product

/HFCS is also almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1

Honey contains trace amounts of peroxide which inhibits microbial growth (guess that's what you meant by anti-microbials). That's why it could be put on wounds to dress them (stops infection, or adds flavor for bears, either way...).

It's amazing stuff. Behold the power of waggle dance.

---Copied and pasted from another post here that I replied to, but I wanted to make sure you saw this:

It's actually because it has a super low moisture content.  17-18%.  Any higher, it would ferment.
The difference between honey other sugars is its acidity. Honey's pH is between 3.26-4.48 which also kills off any bacteria.

/ beekeeper apprentice
// getting a hive this year, to start up in April


It can have multiple properties that prevent spoilage. Acidity, low moisture, containing not only hydrogen peroxide but also glucose oxidase, methylglyoxal, bee defensin-1 (seriously, that's what it's called), among other things.

I'm a homebrewer and have a long business relationship with a master apiarist who supplies several meaderies, is referred to by several local universities, and leads our area's beekeeper society. He says it contains hydrogen peroxide, as do several textbooks. That link is one of the papers he shared with me.

Ask your mentor about the impossibility of "organic" honey existing today, it's heartbreaking.
 
2013-08-30 11:28:00 PM  
Damn... trolling is easy sometimes :)
 
2013-08-30 11:29:21 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: Hollie Maea: Less known is that sago

/fixed


Yeah, you got me there. Appropriately enough, the tastiest sago I've had was with peanut butter and honey on it.
 
2013-08-30 11:34:11 PM  
I find adding water and a small amount of yeast to honey helps to enhance the flavors over time.
What do you mead?
 
2013-08-30 11:37:02 PM  

scubamage: santadog: scubamage: dittybopper: Because it's sugar.  Sugar doesn't go bad.

What do I nguyen?

RogermcAllen: Cerebral Knievel: Because its almost pure sucrose and no bacteria can live in its environment.

You can pickle things with sugar as well as salt.

No it isn't.  It is almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1.

downstairs: Sugar doesn't go bad.

It is good to see people are finally starting to realize that glucose and fructose are sugars just like sucrose.

There are a few factors as to why honey doesn't spoil.
1.  Honey has such a high solids level that microbes (with the exception of a few hardcore yeasts that don't actually spoil the honey) can't grow in it
2.  Honey is very thick.  It is literally difficult for molecules to move around and undergo chemical reactions.  Things like oxidation can't happen when oxygen molecules can't make their way into the honey
3.  Bee spit has anti-microbials

No chemical spoilage and no microbial spoilage = stable product

/HFCS is also almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1

Honey contains trace amounts of peroxide which inhibits microbial growth (guess that's what you meant by anti-microbials). That's why it could be put on wounds to dress them (stops infection, or adds flavor for bears, either way...).

It's amazing stuff. Behold the power of waggle dance.

---Copied and pasted from another post here that I replied to, but I wanted to make sure you saw this:

It's actually because it has a super low moisture content.  17-18%.  Any higher, it would ferment.
The difference between honey other sugars is its acidity. Honey's pH is between 3.26-4.48 which also kills off any bacteria.

/ beekeeper apprentice
// getting a hive this year, to start up in April

It can have multiple properties that prevent spoilage. Acidity, low moisture, containing not only hydrogen peroxide but also glucose oxidase, methylglyoxal, bee defensin-1 (seriously, that's what it's called), among other things.


I know that no one can claim organic honey.  A bee's range is up to 10 miles if it's a hard foraging season.  Preferably 5 miles.  One bee harvesting from one flower that has pesticide applied to it, and your honey is contaminated.   So many keepers use treatments for mites, and that is also a contaminate.
A small circle of beekeepers I know in Ohio (where I grew up) are practicing no chemical keeping.  One is successful after 5 years of losing hives.  Another had 15 hives this past spring, and has been reduced to 2 as of a couple weeks ago.  I'm moving back to Ohio in the spring.  Thus, going full beekeeper.  The only bees I can keep at this altitude (8,000ft in the Rockies) are Mason Bees.  No honey there... but I want to help the pollinators.
I'll be keeping bees to help the bees.  My goal is not to sell honey, but hopefully just get some good hives going just to let them... bee.
 
2013-08-30 11:37:20 PM  
Most of the honey you buy isn't real. The EU has banned the sale of honey imported from many parts of Asia, but of U.S. honey is reportedly smuggled from India and China.  Food Safety News that most store-bought honey had no pollen and contained a lot of additives, like flavored corn syrup and sometimes lead and antibiotics.

//You're welcome :(
 
2013-08-30 11:40:10 PM  

KimNorth: Most of the honey you buy isn't real. The EU has banned the sale of honey imported from many parts of Asia, but of U.S. honey is reportedly smuggled from India and China.  Food Safety News that most store-bought honey had no pollen and contained a lot of additives, like flavored corn syrup and sometimes lead and antibiotics.

//You're welcome :(


Buy from local beekeepers.
 
2013-08-30 11:40:29 PM  

santadog: scubamage: santadog: scubamage: dittybopper: Because it's sugar.  Sugar doesn't go bad.

What do I nguyen?

RogermcAllen: Cerebral Knievel: Because its almost pure sucrose and no bacteria can live in its environment.

You can pickle things with sugar as well as salt.

No it isn't.  It is almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1.

downstairs: Sugar doesn't go bad.

It is good to see people are finally starting to realize that glucose and fructose are sugars just like sucrose.

There are a few factors as to why honey doesn't spoil.
1.  Honey has such a high solids level that microbes (with the exception of a few hardcore yeasts that don't actually spoil the honey) can't grow in it
2.  Honey is very thick.  It is literally difficult for molecules to move around and undergo chemical reactions.  Things like oxidation can't happen when oxygen molecules can't make their way into the honey
3.  Bee spit has anti-microbials

No chemical spoilage and no microbial spoilage = stable product

/HFCS is also almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1

Honey contains trace amounts of peroxide which inhibits microbial growth (guess that's what you meant by anti-microbials). That's why it could be put on wounds to dress them (stops infection, or adds flavor for bears, either way...).

It's amazing stuff. Behold the power of waggle dance.

---Copied and pasted from another post here that I replied to, but I wanted to make sure you saw this:

It's actually because it has a super low moisture content.  17-18%.  Any higher, it would ferment.
The difference between honey other sugars is its acidity. Honey's pH is between 3.26-4.48 which also kills off any bacteria.

/ beekeeper apprentice
// getting a hive this year, to start up in April

It can have multiple properties that prevent spoilage. Acidity, low moisture, containing not only hydrogen peroxide but also glucose oxidase, methylglyoxal, bee defensin-1 (seriously, that's what it's called), among other things.

I kn ...


Keep it up! The world needs more apiarists, especially right now. Plus, do we really want to live in a world with more politicians and lawyers than apiarists and butchers? I think not. :)
 
2013-08-30 11:40:47 PM  
Hooray for honey!
 
433 [TotalFark]
2013-08-30 11:40:50 PM  

santadog: I know that no one can claim organic honey.


what a buzz kill.
 
2013-08-30 11:43:59 PM  

scubamage: Gyrfalcon: stamped human bacon: PacManDreaming: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t puke

FTFY

It's closer to chewing something up and spitting it out as it never goes into the bee's digestive stomach.

/my $.02

The more I learn about honey, the less I WANT TO KNOW, THANK YOU VERY MUCH.

Have I got something to tell you about milk...


Too funny.

/I wasn't technically correct in saying "never".  The bee can consume the honey if it so desires.
 
433 [TotalFark]
2013-08-30 11:44:36 PM  

KimNorth: Food Safety News that most store-bought honey had no pollen and contained a lot of additives, like flavored corn syrup and sometimes lead and antibiotics.


WTF are antibiotics doing in honey?  Above all, how is that not already a lawsuit and a half, if corn syrup isn't listed as ingredient?  Well, oh well.
 
2013-08-30 11:48:49 PM  

433: Above all, how is that not already a lawsuit and a half, if corn syrup isn't listed as ingredient?


This is America.  It is important for things to be cheap.
 
2013-08-30 11:52:19 PM  
Just a word of extreme caution out there; NEVER EVER feed anyone six months or younger any honey! Honey is also a breeding ground for a certain type of spore that can totally mess up the undeveloped digestive system of a baby (human or animal).
 
2013-08-30 11:52:54 PM  

stamped human bacon: scubamage: Gyrfalcon: stamped human bacon: PacManDreaming: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t puke

FTFY

It's closer to chewing something up and spitting it out as it never goes into the bee's digestive stomach.

/my $.02

The more I learn about honey, the less I WANT TO KNOW, THANK YOU VERY MUCH.

Have I got something to tell you about milk...

Too funny.

/I wasn't technically correct in saying "never".  The bee can consume the honey if it so desires.


Technically, honey is the bees food, and they desire it all the time.  It's what they live off of.  If a greedy keeper takes too much honey in the fall, the hive will starve.   Some will winter feed their hives with sugar water, but I believe that to be completely insane.   Bees make the perfect food for themselves, so lets replace that with sugar water.  I feel the same about feeding humming birds sugar water.
 
433 [TotalFark]
2013-08-30 11:55:29 PM  

Hollie Maea: This is America. It is important for things to be cheap.


I like my nicest things to be on shelves, nicer things to be affordable, nice things, inexpensive.  Unfortunately, that is not the way things are for now, and that is I cannot have nice things.,, because then everyone would have them, and I would feel cheap. ;)
 
2013-08-30 11:55:36 PM  

scubamage: santadog: scubamage: santadog: scubamage: dittybopper: Because it's sugar.  Sugar doesn't go bad.

What do I nguyen?

RogermcAllen: Cerebral Knievel: Because its almost pure sucrose and no bacteria can live in its environment.

You can pickle things with sugar as well as salt.

No it isn't.  It is almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1.

downstairs: Sugar doesn't go bad.

It is good to see people are finally starting to realize that glucose and fructose are sugars just like sucrose.

There are a few factors as to why honey doesn't spoil.
1.  Honey has such a high solids level that microbes (with the exception of a few hardcore yeasts that don't actually spoil the honey) can't grow in it
2.  Honey is very thick.  It is literally difficult for molecules to move around and undergo chemical reactions.  Things like oxidation can't happen when oxygen molecules can't make their way into the honey
3.  Bee spit has anti-microbials

No chemical spoilage and no microbial spoilage = stable product

/HFCS is also almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1

Honey contains trace amounts of peroxide which inhibits microbial growth (guess that's what you meant by anti-microbials). That's why it could be put on wounds to dress them (stops infection, or adds flavor for bears, either way...).

It's amazing stuff. Behold the power of waggle dance.

---Copied and pasted from another post here that I replied to, but I wanted to make sure you saw this:

It's actually because it has a super low moisture content.  17-18%.  Any higher, it would ferment.
The difference between honey other sugars is its acidity. Honey's pH is between 3.26-4.48 which also kills off any bacteria.

/ beekeeper apprentice
// getting a hive this year, to start up in April

It can have multiple properties that prevent spoilage. Acidity, low moisture, containing not only hydrogen peroxide but also glucose oxidase, methylglyoxal, bee defensin-1 (seriously, that's what it's called), among other thi ..


Funny you should say that.  I'll also be raising chickens and meat rabbits.  :)  Going back to my farm roots.
 
2013-08-30 11:57:08 PM  
www.metro.us
 
2013-08-31 12:11:49 AM  

Skyfrog: theorellior: Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.

I've had peanut butter and syrup sandwiches with chili but I've never tried peanut butter and honey. I'm intrigued by the idea.


Are you kidding me?  Peanut butter and honey sandwiches are the best!  Followed only by peanut butter and banana sandwiches and peanut butter and bacon sandwiches.  Mix and match to your personal taste.  Food fit for a King.
 
2013-08-31 12:14:11 AM  
santadog:Technically, honey is the bees food, and they desire it all the time.  It's what they live off of.  If a greedy keeper takes too much honey in the fall, the hive will starve.   Some will winter feed their hives with sugar water, but I believe that to be completely insane.   Bees make the perfect food for themselves, so lets replace that with sugar water.  I feel the same about feeding humming birds sugar water.

The thing with birds is, they don't rely solely on manmade bird feeders. If they find a safe feeder, they'll add it to their mental lists of places with food. Hummingbirds will take supplemental nutrition from their feeders, just as sparrows and woodpeckers will take seeds and suet from theirs. The extra calories are certainly not replacing the local flora and insect life, and if the feeders went away, they'd survive. We'd just see less of them.

Not really a fair comparison, in other words.
 
2013-08-31 12:14:31 AM  

42_42_42: From the article:

But honey crystallizes most quickly at temperatures of between 50 and 59 °F. So, if you want to avoid having to heat your honey to remove crystals (apparently slow, indirect heat is best for that, by the way), avoid the refrigerator.

Who the fark is keeping their refrigerator this warm?



The British?
 
2013-08-31 12:16:32 AM  

ciberido: Skyfrog: theorellior: Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.

I've had peanut butter and syrup sandwiches with chili but I've never tried peanut butter and honey. I'm intrigued by the idea.

Are you kidding me?  Peanut butter and honey sandwiches are the best!  Followed only by peanut butter and banana sandwiches and peanut butter and bacon sandwiches.  Mix and match to your personal taste.  Food fit for a King.


Peanut butter and honey sandwiches are best with creamed honey, and butter on the bread. Good crusty, white bread.
 
2013-08-31 12:20:26 AM  

ciberido: 42_42_42: From the article:

But honey crystallizes most quickly at temperatures of between 50 and 59 °F. So, if you want to avoid having to heat your honey to remove crystals (apparently slow, indirect heat is best for that, by the way), avoid the refrigerator.

Who the fark is keeping their refrigerator this warm?


The British?


Why would that be?
 
2013-08-31 12:22:46 AM  

Spiralmonkey: ciberido: 42_42_42: From the article:

But honey crystallizes most quickly at temperatures of between 50 and 59 °F. So, if you want to avoid having to heat your honey to remove crystals (apparently slow, indirect heat is best for that, by the way), avoid the refrigerator.

Who the fark is keeping their refrigerator this warm?


The British?

Why would that be?


So their beer doesn't get too cold?
 
2013-08-31 12:33:26 AM  

whatshisname: Peanut butter and honey sandwiches are best with creamed honey, and butter on the bread. Good crusty, white bread.


OH HELL YES THIS^^^^

/loves me some PB & H
 
2013-08-31 12:33:41 AM  

Skyfrog: theorellior: Canton: theorellior: There's also a protein in the sugary bee barf that emits small amounts of hydrogen peroxide if it does get wet.

Interesting? Is that why honey tastes so unpleasant?

YMMV, my friend. Just means more sugary bee barf for me.

Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.

I've had peanut butter and syrup sandwiches with chili but I've never tried peanut butter and honey. I'm intrigued by the idea.


That was a classic in our family. Midwestern thing maybe.
 
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