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(io9)   Honey is pretty much the only food that doesn't go bad. Why?   (io9.com) divider line 195
    More: Interesting, hydrogen peroxides, Alexander the Great, lovers, nectars, open wound  
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19071 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Aug 2013 at 9:14 PM (44 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-30 09:54:33 PM
This information bodes well for that pack of KFC honey from 1987 that I've been holding onto.
 
2013-08-30 09:55:14 PM

Hollie Maea: Less known is that sago


/fixed
 
2013-08-30 09:56:22 PM

Jon iz teh kewl: neither does Marmite.


Something cannot "go" bad when it's already there.
 
2013-08-30 09:57:25 PM

the_sidewinder: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t

/how bad could it get?

No it isn't

/Bee barf


Right, like that's so much better.
 
2013-08-30 09:59:53 PM

Gyrfalcon: the_sidewinder: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t

/how bad could it get?

No it isn't

/Bee barf

Right, like that's so much better.


Right, like that's the point.  Or like it matters.
 
2013-08-30 10:00:51 PM
Cause I dipped my pecker in it. That's why.
 
2013-08-30 10:01:15 PM
I've recently wondered if humus ever goes bad.  It doesn't seem to.
 
2013-08-30 10:01:26 PM

addy2: Am I reading wrong? They say honey shouldn't be in temperatures from 50 to 70 degrees so no fridge. But your fridge should be at most 40 degrees. What am I missing?


I noticed that too. I assume it was a typo or maybe the writer just doesn't know what temperature fridges keep.
 
2013-08-30 10:03:46 PM

MurphyMurphy: Sugar.

Salt.

Alcohol.

Vinegar.


How do they work?

/wood smoke to a degree


Not foods.

/unless you know of an organism that eats any of them
//and by "eats" i mean "subsists on"
///and I suppose "organism" should be bigger than a bacterium
////I'll settle for bacterium just out of curiosity
 
2013-08-30 10:08:51 PM

jaytkay: Lsherm: I have a twinkie from 1986 that is still edible.

How do you know?


Oh, it's been out of its wrapper since 1996.  We use a toothpick to pick off part of it every Christmas and eat it.  We aren't even halfway through, so I figure it might last until I die.

They shrink a little bit, and the middle hollows out eventually, but it still retains the shape.
 
2013-08-30 10:09:41 PM

ArcadianRefugee: ////I'll settle for bacterium just out of curiosity


Why wine goes sour (and where most of the vinegar comes from)
During fermentation, activity by yeast cells naturally produces a small amount of acetic acid. If the wine is exposed to oxygen, Acetobacter bacteria will convert the ethanol into acetic acid.
 
2013-08-30 10:11:45 PM
Also, it's a good idea to spend a couple bucks more and get honey from a local apiary or supplier. The blended honey you see in supermarkets may or may not have HFCS, dyes, or any number of crazy extenders in it.
 
2013-08-30 10:12:07 PM
I've got a Fruit Fly population in my garage / shop that is growing increasingly annoying.

Recently I tried making a trap by drizzling some honey onto a paper plate, expecting that the next morning a bunch of the little bastards would be caught up in it like a herd of Mastodons in a tar pit.

As it happens, not one farking fly in two days and nights.  TFA says that honey is fairly acidic, so maybe that's why they wouldnt touch it.
 
2013-08-30 10:13:34 PM
Just remember, a lot of what you buy as honey isn't real honey. Corn syrup everywhere. If you get a local supplier or from a farmer's market or the like, all the better.

The stay fresh rule does not apply if the honeycomb is included, IIRC.
 
2013-08-30 10:16:15 PM

theorellior: Canton: theorellior: There's also a protein in the sugary bee barf that emits small amounts of hydrogen peroxide if it does get wet.

Interesting? Is that why honey tastes so unpleasant?

YMMV, my friend. Just means more sugary bee barf for me.

Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.


Hmm. I may have to try that, if I can track down a small jar of local honey. My only fear is that it would be totally wasted on me.

Awful, isn't it? I love insects, I don't fear bees, and I'd have no problem eating their vomit if only my taste buds appreciated the stuff.

/Le sigh
//At least there's always maple syrup
///Mmm, tree sap...
 
2013-08-30 10:17:37 PM

theorellior: Canton: theorellior: There's also a protein in the sugary bee barf that emits small amounts of hydrogen peroxide if it does get wet.

Interesting? Is that why honey tastes so unpleasant?

YMMV, my friend. Just means more sugary bee barf for me.

Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.


I've had peanut butter and syrup sandwiches with chili but I've never tried peanut butter and honey. I'm intrigued by the idea.
 
2013-08-30 10:17:44 PM

MrHappyRotter: Gyrfalcon: the_sidewinder: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t

/how bad could it get?

No it isn't

/Bee barf

Right, like that's so much better.

Right, like that's the point.  Or like it matters.


Oh dear god, you're already tightening the sphincter on your sarcasm meter, aren't you? And it's barely Friday night on a long weekend...
 
2013-08-30 10:19:22 PM

Gyrfalcon: MrHappyRotter: Gyrfalcon: the_sidewinder: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t

/how bad could it get?

No it isn't

/Bee barf

Right, like that's so much better.

Right, like that's the point.  Or like it matters.

Oh dear god, you're already tightening the sphincter on your sarcasm meter, aren't you? And it's barely Friday night on a long weekend...


What I do with my sphincter on a Friday night is NONE OF YOUR FLUNKING BUSINESS.
 
2013-08-30 10:19:58 PM

TomD9938: I've got a Fruit Fly population in my garage / shop that is growing increasingly annoying.

Recently I tried making a trap by drizzling some honey onto a paper plate, expecting that the next morning a bunch of the little bastards would be caught up in it like a herd of Mastodons in a tar pit.

As it happens, not one farking fly in two days and nights.  TFA says that honey is fairly acidic, so maybe that's why they wouldnt touch it.


Fruit flies are attracted to vinegar.  Take notes.  No need to thank me later.
 
2013-08-30 10:20:32 PM
Ginger snaps never go bad, they actually get better.
 
2013-08-30 10:20:54 PM

Gyrfalcon: the_sidewinder: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t

/how bad could it get?

No it isn't

/Bee barf

Right, like that's so much better.


On warm home-made toast with butter? Man, that's heaven.
 
2013-08-30 10:22:30 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Hot sauce, pickles, and lowfat milk also never go bad.


Pickles don't go bad because they are already evil.


One of my favorite memories as a kid, was going out with my Grandfather to tend his bee hives. He always made sure to get stung at least once on the back of each hand before he was done. I asked him why, and he said it made his arthritis a lot less painful for about a week.
 
2013-08-30 10:22:51 PM

MrHappyRotter: TomD9938: I've got a Fruit Fly population in my garage / shop that is growing increasingly annoying.

Recently I tried making a trap by drizzling some honey onto a paper plate, expecting that the next morning a bunch of the little bastards would be caught up in it like a herd of Mastodons in a tar pit.

As it happens, not one farking fly in two days and nights.  TFA says that honey is fairly acidic, so maybe that's why they wouldnt touch it.

Fruit flies are attracted to vinegar.  Take notes.  No need to thank me later.


Wow. I seriously thought you were making a honey/vinegar joke, but apparently you were not.

Maybe vinegar used as bait in a homemade flytrap would solve the fruit fly problem...
 
2013-08-30 10:25:06 PM

Canton: MrHappyRotter: TomD9938: I've got a Fruit Fly population in my garage / shop that is growing increasingly annoying.

Recently I tried making a trap by drizzling some honey onto a paper plate, expecting that the next morning a bunch of the little bastards would be caught up in it like a herd of Mastodons in a tar pit.

As it happens, not one farking fly in two days and nights.  TFA says that honey is fairly acidic, so maybe that's why they wouldnt touch it.

Fruit flies are attracted to vinegar.  Take notes.  No need to thank me later.

Wow. I seriously thought you were making a honey/vinegar joke, but apparently you were not.

Maybe vinegar used as bait in a homemade flytrap would solve the fruit fly problem...


I have used those and it does work. I used clear cellophane with small holes poked in it to cover a small cup of vinegar; they can get in but they can't find their way out.
 
2013-08-30 10:26:07 PM

TomD9938: I've got a Fruit Fly population in my garage / shop that is growing increasingly annoying.

Recently I tried making a trap by drizzling some honey onto a paper plate, expecting that the next morning a bunch of the little bastards would be caught up in it like a herd of Mastodons in a tar pit.

As it happens, not one farking fly in two days and nights.  TFA says that honey is fairly acidic, so maybe that's why they wouldnt touch it.


It's been said already but they LOVE vinegar. Get yourself some cider vinegar (sweeter = better for this) and a couple small bowls or cups (I use jelly jars because I have a couple dozen lying around).

Put about an inch-deep of vinegar and drop 1 or 2 drops of dish soap (to break the surface tension) in each cup, and set them around in various areas of your garage. Then come back the next day and be amazed.

/home brewer
//one fruit fly can turn 5 gallons of beer into vinegar
///probably the best vinegar you'll ever have but I still would rather have the beer
 
2013-08-30 10:26:52 PM

MrHappyRotter: TomD9938: I've got a Fruit Fly population in my garage / shop that is growing increasingly annoying.

Recently I tried making a trap by drizzling some honey onto a paper plate, expecting that the next morning a bunch of the little bastards would be caught up in it like a herd of Mastodons in a tar pit.

As it happens, not one farking fly in two days and nights.  TFA says that honey is fairly acidic, so maybe that's why they wouldnt touch it.

Fruit flies are attracted to vinegar.  Take notes.  No need to thank me later.



Interesting.  Will it work as a trap though?

I'm not really looking to give them an awesome treat.

/ will try some malted vinegar in the bottom of a cup tonight...
 
2013-08-30 10:27:15 PM
www.bubblews.com

/currently eating oats that were in its unopened plastic packaging - bought over 3 years ago; still tastes yummy!
 
2013-08-30 10:27:21 PM

Skyfrog: theorellior: Canton: theorellior: There's also a protein in the sugary bee barf that emits small amounts of hydrogen peroxide if it does get wet.

Interesting? Is that why honey tastes so unpleasant?

YMMV, my friend. Just means more sugary bee barf for me.

Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.

I've had peanut butter and syrup sandwiches with chili but I've never tried peanut butter and honey. I'm intrigued by the idea.


peanut butter, apple slices, honey and bacon sandwich.
 
433 [TotalFark]
2013-08-30 10:27:32 PM
...because it's just that good.
 
2013-08-30 10:29:15 PM

Canton: theorellior: Canton: theorellior: There's also a protein in the sugary bee barf that emits small amounts of hydrogen peroxide if it does get wet.

Interesting? Is that why honey tastes so unpleasant?

YMMV, my friend. Just means more sugary bee barf for me.

Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.

Hmm. I may have to try that, if I can track down a small jar of local honey. My only fear is that it would be totally wasted on me.

Awful, isn't it? I love insects, I don't fear bees, and I'd have no problem eating their vomit if only my taste buds appreciated the stuff.

/Le sigh
//At least there's always maple syrup
///Mmm, tree sap...


FWIW, honey will taste dramatically different depending on what plants the bees have been pollinating and whatnot. Clover honey tends to be pretty light, mild, and sweet. Chestnut honey is bitter as fark. Pine honey is (usually) the nectar of the gods. Most local honey comes from a variety of sources and may taste good or bad (to you) depending on the plants, the particular hive, the year/weather, etc. Also, if you're just eating honey straight, you might find it more enjoyable if you tried it on a piece of fresh bread or some other medium.

If you end up getting local honey from a beekeeper, see if he can tell you the probable source or let you try a sample or something or if he can recommend a particular batch you might enjoy.

/used to hate honey
//met a beekeeper/baker, tried tons of different kinds of honey
///loved some, liked some, hated some
////also, honey + peanut butter = delicious
 
2013-08-30 10:31:09 PM
io9 is pretty much a site written by morons that keeps getting Fark greenlights.
 
2013-08-30 10:32:25 PM
blog.zap2it.com

Decomposing ever since she could eat.
 
2013-08-30 10:32:52 PM
How about dog's mi...

LordOfThePings:
[i1.ytimg.com image 480x360]

When it goes off, it tastes exactly the same as when it's fresh.


SON OF A...

That's it.  I'm out this biatch.  Y'all are doing JUST FINE WITHOUT ME.
 
2013-08-30 10:33:31 PM

From the article:

But honey crystallizes most quickly at temperatures of between 50 and 59 °F. So, if you want to avoid having to heat your honey to remove crystals (apparently slow, indirect heat is best for that, by the way), avoid the refrigerator.


Who the fark is keeping their refrigerator this warm? Refrigerators should be between 34 and 40 °F. Over 40 °F and food is officially in the "danger zone" that promotes bacterial growth.
 
2013-08-30 10:33:31 PM

GungFu: [www.bubblews.com image 605x640]

/currently eating oats that were in its unopened plastic packaging - bought over 3 years ago; still tastes yummy!


http://aht.seriouseats.com/archives/2010/11/the-burger-lab-revisitin g- the-myth-of-the-12-year-old-burger-testing-results.html
 
2013-08-30 10:34:00 PM

GungFu: [www.bubblews.com image 605x640]


morgan spurlock is a farking idiotic, science-hating coont. That is the politest true statement I can say about him.

/covering something in salt will help prevent microbial growth
//as will adding chemical preservatives
 
2013-08-30 10:34:22 PM
Thanks all, will try it.  I hope they like malted vinegar, cause, you know... that's all I've got in the house at the moment.
 
2013-08-30 10:35:00 PM

Skyfrog: theorellior: Canton: theorellior: There's also a protein in the sugary bee barf that emits small amounts of hydrogen peroxide if it does get wet.

Interesting? Is that why honey tastes so unpleasant?

YMMV, my friend. Just means more sugary bee barf for me.

Incidentally, if you drizzle honey into natural-style peanut butter and then stir it until it emulsifies, it's like better than crack.

I've had peanut butter and syrup sandwiches with chili but I've never tried peanut butter and honey. I'm intrigued by the idea.


It's really good.  When I'm on a diet and need a low-cal snack, I just mix up a bowl of peanut butter and honey and that does the trick.  If the peanut butter jar is more than 1/3 gone I just pour the honey right in and eat it with a malt spoon. Or drizzle it over a block of cream cheese.
 
2013-08-30 10:35:19 PM

Cerebral Knievel: Because its almost pure sucrose and no bacteria can live in its environment.

You can pickle things with sugar as well as salt.


No it isn't.  It is almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1.

downstairs: Sugar doesn't go bad.


It is good to see people are finally starting to realize that glucose and fructose are sugars just like sucrose.

There are a few factors as to why honey doesn't spoil.
1.  Honey has such a high solids level that microbes (with the exception of a few hardcore yeasts that don't actually spoil the honey) can't grow in it
2.  Honey is very thick.  It is literally difficult for molecules to move around and undergo chemical reactions.  Things like oxidation can't happen when oxygen molecules can't make their way into the honey
3.  Bee spit has anti-microbials

No chemical spoilage and no microbial spoilage = stable product

/HFCS is also almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1
 
2013-08-30 10:36:23 PM

42_42_42: From the article:

But honey crystallizes most quickly at temperatures of between 50 and 59 °F. So, if you want to avoid having to heat your honey to remove crystals (apparently slow, indirect heat is best for that, by the way), avoid the refrigerator.

Who the fark is keeping their refrigerator this warm? Refrigerators should be between 34 and 40 °F. Over 40 °F and food is officially in the "danger zone" that promotes bacterial growth.


...and who the fark is keeping honey in the refrigerator, in the first place?
 
2013-08-30 10:36:31 PM
Skyfrog:I've had peanut butter and syrup sandwiches with chili but I've never tried peanut butter and honey. I'm intrigued by the idea.

Peanut butter and honey sandwiches are great, I always preferred it over using jelly.
 
2013-08-30 10:37:23 PM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t puke


FTFY
 
2013-08-30 10:40:18 PM

dittybopper: Because it's sugar.  Sugar doesn't go bad.

What do I nguyen?


RogermcAllen: Cerebral Knievel: Because its almost pure sucrose and no bacteria can live in its environment.

You can pickle things with sugar as well as salt.

No it isn't.  It is almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1.

downstairs: Sugar doesn't go bad.

It is good to see people are finally starting to realize that glucose and fructose are sugars just like sucrose.

There are a few factors as to why honey doesn't spoil.
1.  Honey has such a high solids level that microbes (with the exception of a few hardcore yeasts that don't actually spoil the honey) can't grow in it
2.  Honey is very thick.  It is literally difficult for molecules to move around and undergo chemical reactions.  Things like oxidation can't happen when oxygen molecules can't make their way into the honey
3.  Bee spit has anti-microbials

No chemical spoilage and no microbial spoilage = stable product

/HFCS is also almost pure glucose and fructose in a ratio of ~1:1


Honey contains trace amounts of peroxide which inhibits microbial growth (guess that's what you meant by anti-microbials). That's why it could be put on wounds to dress them (stops infection, or adds flavor for bears, either way...).

It's amazing stuff. Behold the power of waggle dance.
 
2013-08-30 10:42:05 PM

TomD9938: I've got a Fruit Fly population in my garage / shop that is growing increasingly annoying.

Recently I tried making a trap by drizzling some honey onto a paper plate, expecting that the next morning a bunch of the little bastards would be caught up in it like a herd of Mastodons in a tar pit.

As it happens, not one farking fly in two days and nights.  TFA says that honey is fairly acidic, so maybe that's why they wouldnt touch it.


Best fruit-fly trap is to put some overripe fruit in a small glass container, then cover it tightly with plastic wrap.  Poke some small holes in the plastic wrap.  The fruit flies will be attracted to the CO2 and aldehydes being given off by the rotting fruit, and they won't fly back out.  After a few days, cover with another layer of plastic wrap and freeze to kill.
 
2013-08-30 10:42:54 PM
Demands a recount:
img2u.info
 
2013-08-30 10:43:11 PM
True story: I was biking in a rural area and spotted about half of a Slim Jim in the dirt close to the road. I figured it would be gone the next time I biked by, but a week later there it was. There are plenty of skunks, rats and coyotes in the area so I was surprised it lasted so long. But three months later it was still there. Nothing was eating it, no bugs, birds, bacteria, or mammals would touch the thing. It shriveled and leeched some oil around itself as the summer got hotter so it had a wet looking area around it. But it wasn't touched. Finally got some rain and it disappeared, I think it just washed into the ditch.
I wouldn't eat one of those things on a bet now.
 
2013-08-30 10:43:50 PM
I thought white rice could last forever if kept dry and critter free.
 
2013-08-30 10:44:35 PM

MrHappyRotter: Gyrfalcon: MrHappyRotter: Gyrfalcon: the_sidewinder: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t

/how bad could it get?

No it isn't

/Bee barf

Right, like that's so much better.

Right, like that's the point.  Or like it matters.

Oh dear god, you're already tightening the sphincter on your sarcasm meter, aren't you? And it's barely Friday night on a long weekend...

What I do with my sphincter on a Friday night is NONE OF YOUR FLUNKING BUSINESS.


Howabout on a Saturday morning?
 
2013-08-30 10:44:41 PM

PacManDreaming: MaudlinMutantMollusk: It's bee sh*t puke

FTFY


It's closer to chewing something up and spitting it out as it never goes into the bee's digestive stomach.

/my $.02
 
2013-08-30 10:45:13 PM
BECAUSE FARK YOU, THAT'S WHY.
 
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