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(Wired)   Black and white photos of storm supercells exist just to remind us what the word "awesome" actually means   (wired.com) divider line 29
    More: Cool, photography, lightening, Great Plains, saturation, apertures, supercell thunderstorms  
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6121 clicks; posted to Geek » on 30 Aug 2013 at 12:03 PM (52 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



29 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-08-30 12:06:49 PM
Contrary to the article writer's title, these awesome pictures don't really belie the depicted storms' destructive powers.
 
2013-08-30 12:16:18 PM
OK, which one of you answered "No" to Zul?
 
2013-08-30 12:23:22 PM
That picture in New Mexico is nice. I see that from a distance often but looking nothing like that.
 
2013-08-30 12:23:54 PM
The New Mexico one isn't a supercell (well, as far as I can tell; there's no wall cloud and a very high cloud base typical of monsoon thunderstorms in the arid Southwest; it probably produced a downburst or two).

Regardless, those are pretty cool.
 
2013-08-30 12:25:05 PM
Midwestern weather is farked up, man.

Had to pull off the highway this summer in south Dakota because it was raining so hard you couldn't see the taillights of the car 15 feet in front of you. Never experienced that anything close to that on the easy coast.
 
2013-08-30 12:25:51 PM

gnosis301: Contrary to the article writer's title, these awesome pictures don't really belie the depicted storms' destructive powers.


Indeed; I do not believe that word means what the author thinks it means.
 
2013-08-30 12:36:55 PM
What they're pictures OF is cool enough, but the photography is amazing. The range of grays and the definition is fantastic. I wonder how much post-processing is involved.
 
2013-08-30 12:51:51 PM

MrBallou: What they're pictures OF is cool enough, but the photography is amazing. The range of grays and the definition is fantastic. I wonder how much post-processing is involved.


I think most if not all are infrared photos
 
kth
2013-08-30 12:53:52 PM

Debeo Summa Credo: Midwestern weather is farked up, man.

Had to pull off the highway this summer in south Dakota because it was raining so hard you couldn't see the taillights of the car 15 feet in front of you. Never experienced that anything close to that on the easy coast.


We had to do that on I-70 in Kansas on the way home from our honeymoon. When we parked the car, it was rocking around and the wind seemed to be going towards the cell. The temperature at mile marker 246 was 104 degrees. Temp at 256 was 68 degrees.

We looked at each other, said "It's been fun" and ran to the ditch.  We had the weather radio on battery, and they were saying the worst of the thunderstorm was 10 miles west of Solomon. The only sign we could see was one saying Solomon 10.

By the time we got to the nearest gas station, soaking wet and shivering, it was 104 again. They looked at us funny as we bought hot chocolates.

img.photobucket.com

Pic from a while later.
 
2013-08-30 12:54:57 PM

jmsvrsn: MrBallou: What they're pictures OF is cool enough, but the photography is amazing. The range of grays and the definition is fantastic. I wonder how much post-processing is involved.

I think most if not all are infrared photos


Was wondering about that
 
2013-08-30 01:08:25 PM

b0rscht: The New Mexico one isn't a supercell (well, as far as I can tell; there's no wall cloud and a very high cloud base typical of monsoon thunderstorms in the arid Southwest; it probably produced a downburst or two).

Regardless, those are pretty cool.


Came here to say this.  If there's not even a gust front + shelf cloud, it can't be a supercell.
 
2013-08-30 01:09:47 PM

jmsvrsn: MrBallou: What they're pictures OF is cool enough, but the photography is amazing. The range of grays and the definition is fantastic. I wonder how much post-processing is involved.

I think most if not all are infrared photos


I learned something here today. The Power of Fark.
 
2013-08-30 01:11:27 PM
We often think of our nation as pretty 'meh' but it has so many diverse areas that are fascinating. Yes, even the Great American Desert.

Thanks, subs.
 
2013-08-30 01:37:05 PM

jmsvrsn: MrBallou: What they're pictures OF is cool enough, but the photography is amazing. The range of grays and the definition is fantastic. I wonder how much post-processing is involved.

I think most if not all are infrared photos


Explain please?  I thought they were just hi-def shots with fast shutter.
 
2013-08-30 01:41:25 PM

Odd Bird: jmsvrsn: MrBallou: What they're pictures OF is cool enough, but the photography is amazing. The range of grays and the definition is fantastic. I wonder how much post-processing is involved.

I think most if not all are infrared photos

Explain please?  I thought they were just hi-def shots with fast shutter.


Here you go.
 
2013-08-30 01:44:39 PM
Kids today have no idea what "dodging" and "burning" are (in relation to print processing, that is).  

That kind of makes me sad.
 
2013-08-30 01:51:47 PM

wiredroach: Odd Bird: jmsvrsn: MrBallou: What they're pictures OF is cool enough, but the photography is amazing. The range of grays and the definition is fantastic. I wonder how much post-processing is involved.

I think most if not all are infrared photos

Explain please?  I thought they were just hi-def shots with fast shutter.

Here you go.


I think we now understand what infrared photography is. Now explain why these must be infrared photographs. It is never mentioned in the article and not a safe assumption. Properly done BW photographs can have fascinating appearances. It is more than just desaturating a color photo or using the BW mode on the camera.
 
2013-08-30 02:01:23 PM
Meteorological Porn
 
2013-08-30 02:03:51 PM

Tobin_Lam: wiredroach: Odd Bird: jmsvrsn: MrBallou: What they're pictures OF is cool enough, but the photography is amazing. The range of grays and the definition is fantastic. I wonder how much post-processing is involved.

I think most if not all are infrared photos

Explain please?  I thought they were just hi-def shots with fast shutter.

Here you go.

I think we now understand what infrared photography is. Now explain why these must be infrared photographs. It is never mentioned in the article and not a safe assumption. Properly done BW photographs can have fascinating appearances. It is more than just desaturating a color photo or using the BW mode on the camera.


I think the lightness of the crops, particularly in South Dakota 2011, was the giveaway for me.
 
2013-08-30 02:10:46 PM
Huh...  Never shot a storm in IR.  Looks like I'll have something to try when this damned drought ends.
 
2013-08-30 02:17:15 PM

Tobin_Lam: I think we now understand what infrared photography is. Now explain why these must be infrared photographs. It is never mentioned in the article and not a safe assumption. Properly done BW photographs can have fascinating appearances. It is more than just desaturating a color photo or using the BW mode on the camera.


1) Some aspects of the storm structure are not normally visible to the naked eye/not easily discerned when seen only in the visible spectrum, because they tend to be shrouded by clouds of similar colour/brightness etc.
www.wired.com

2) This particular photographer (Mitch Dobrowner) is well-known for his combined visual/infrared shots of landscapes; he's won awards for them.
defocused.interrobang.org
This kind of output is not easy to get using only visible spectrum ambient light.  The moving clouds would look much more blurry than they are, as they advanced through a very long exposure.

3) From a different article:

"To someone who might be accustomed to using Photoshop for black-and-white conversions, this methodology may seem too constraining. But when you consider that Dobrowner usually goes into the field with a camera capable of shooting infrared photography, as well as a regular unconverted camera, you can see the true advantages. Using Live View shows him what the infrared image looks like immediately. If he adds a filter, he can see exactly how it affects the image, since he is viewing in black-and-white mode. He's had quite a bit of experience with infrared photography from his film days when he used to shoot with infrared color and infrared black-and-white film."
 
2013-08-30 04:01:23 PM
The third photo looks like the sky is trying to drill into the ground
 
2013-08-30 05:03:02 PM
www.hobbyking.com
 
2013-08-30 05:18:25 PM

Thurston Howell: Tobin_Lam: I think we now understand what infrared photography is. Now explain why these must be infrared photographs. It is never mentioned in the article and not a safe assumption. Properly done BW photographs can have fascinating appearances. It is more than just desaturating a color photo or using the BW mode on the camera.

1) Some aspects of the storm structure are not normally visible to the naked eye/not easily discerned when seen only in the visible spectrum, because they tend to be shrouded by clouds of similar colour/brightness etc.
[www.wired.com image 850x566]

2) This particular photographer (Mitch Dobrowner) is well-known for his combined visual/infrared shots of landscapes; he's won awards for them.
[defocused.interrobang.org image 850x566]
This kind of output is not easy to get using only visible spectrum ambient light.  The moving clouds would look much more blurry than they are, as they advanced through a very long exposure.

3) From a different article:

"To someone who might be accustomed to using Photoshop for black-and-white conversions, this methodology may seem too constraining. But when you consider that Dobrowner usually goes into the field with a camera capable of shooting infrared photography, as well as a regular unconverted camera, you can see the true advantages. Using Live View shows him what the infrared image looks like immediately. If he adds a filter, he can see exactly how it affects the image, since he is viewing in black-and-white mode. He's had quite a bit of experience with infrared photography from his film days when he used to shoot with infrared color and infrared black-and-white film."


That is acceptable.
 
2013-08-30 07:37:24 PM
Black and white landscape/weather photos = class 5 FAIL. Seriously, wtf-ing f?
 
2013-08-30 08:06:27 PM

SacriliciousBeerSwiller: Black and white landscape/weather photos = class 5 FAIL. Seriously, wtf-ing f?


Black and white allows one to emphasize certain elements based on color and draw attention to it without some distractions. It is just a different kind if presentation.
 
2013-08-30 09:03:50 PM

SacriliciousBeerSwiller: Black and white landscape/weather photos = class 5 FAIL. Seriously, wtf-ing f?


I'll let Ansel Adams refute your idiotic statement:

ghasira.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-08-31 07:13:24 AM
Oh look, it's these pictures again.
 
2013-08-31 08:01:33 AM
FTA: "I don't like to see a lot of destruction or violence. If I want to see that, I can see it on the streets of Los Angeles where I live," he says. "Out on the plains I can just enjoy the serenity and beauty of [not being actually inside]the storms, [just watching them from a safe distance, like when I watch riot news footage from my home in Glendale.]"

There. Fixed that for you.

/not a tornado survivor
//just feel more empathy with them, and not this d-bag artist capturing home-shattering storms on his $11,000 camera.
 
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