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(io9)   List of scientific breakthroughs that ended science fiction sub-genres. Here comes the science...to kill your dreams   (io9.com ) divider line
    More: Sad, waste disposal, Elisabetta Canalis, Edgar Rice Burroughs, H.G. Wells, ninth planet, long-term memories, Richard Feynman, life on Mars  
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6939 clicks; posted to Geek » on 29 Aug 2013 at 5:55 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-29 05:07:59 PM  
And the missed the fact that we recently found out we will never be able teleport living matter.

/no star trek teleporters.
 
2013-08-29 05:28:58 PM  
Johnny Mnemonichas a character trading his own long-term memory for the ability to carry 80Gb-160Gb of data in his head.

And you'll remember that they delivered that data on a mini disk. Memory for storing that much data wasn't expensive or difficult to come by. Cramming that much memory covertly into a human's head was the difficulty.
 
2013-08-29 05:58:33 PM  
with Percival Lowell claiming there were "canals" on Mars that were created by intelligent creatures,

newstalgia.crooksandliars.com


"Sounds legit."

And a star was born.
 
2013-08-29 06:01:58 PM  
Remember silicon-based life forms?

www.esquire.com

Vividly.
 
2013-08-29 06:02:54 PM  
We actually put people on the Moon in 1969, and a whole genre died forever.

ahem   http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1182345/
 
2013-08-29 06:07:24 PM  

Honest Bender: Johnny Mnemonichas a character trading his own long-term memory for the ability to carry 80Gb-160Gb of data in his head.

And you'll remember that they delivered that data on a mini disk. Memory for storing that much data wasn't expensive or difficult to come by. Cramming that much memory covertly into a human's head was the difficulty.


64 GB Micro-SD cards, 5 of them would store the big 300 GB he was carrying in the movie.  Not exactly super-science nowadays.

Concealing 5 Micro-SD cards inside a human body would not be hard at all.  Even if you wanted to cram it in the head, you could probably use the nasal cavity.
 
2013-08-29 06:08:19 PM  

Silverstaff: Concealing 5 Micro-SD cards inside a human body would not be hard at all. Even if you wanted to cram it in the head, you could probably use the nasal cavity.


2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-08-29 06:10:36 PM  

Honest Bender: Johnny Mnemonichas a character trading his own long-term memory for the ability to carry 80Gb-160Gb of data in his head.

And you'll remember that they delivered that data on a mini disk. Memory for storing that much data wasn't expensive or difficult to come by. Cramming that much memory covertly into a human's head was the difficulty.


More importantly, the story was about the data being so sensitive that it couldn't be put into worldwide computer network.  (Remember that Johnny M was a first-effort that resulted in the Neuromancer trilogy universe) Industrial espionage and corporate-controlled government oversight of "the Matrix" computer network (yes, it was called the matrix!) were such that the only safe way to move really sensitive data was via a human courier.  So... yeah, that genre wasn't so much "killed" by scientific breakthrough as "rendered nonfiction" by current politics.

Also, to say that "Nobody is afraid of over-population anymore" and all the sub-tropes of that fear is also pretty friggen stupid.  Paolo Bacigalupi's "The Windup Girl" (which I first learned about via io9.com, ironically enough) is a 21st-century version of that exact fear.  But clearly the author of this idiotic list hasn't read that book, or any of the recent others of a similar vein.
 
2013-08-29 06:11:39 PM  

thamike: Remember silicon-based life forms?

[www.esquire.com image 300x400]

Vividly.


the article even included the phrase "huge tract of land" it just feels like you should have tossed that in there too.

\Sorry, I just can't take the phrase seriously anymore.
 
2013-08-29 06:11:41 PM  

Silverstaff: 64 GB Micro-SD cards, 5 of them would store the big 300 GB he was carrying in the movie.


The data wasn't stored on a memory stick shoved into his brain. It was stored IN his brain.
 
2013-08-29 06:15:42 PM  
They forgot the biggest one of all: contact with alien life. The universe is so vast that even in a  universe teeming with intelligent life  (a BIG if) the chances of any other life having the ability to even contact us is virtually nil. The idea of traveling from one star system to another even factoring in faster than life transportation would take such a long time as to be practically impossible. In short we will never meet Mr Spock and there will never be a "galactic empire or a "rebel alliance.'
 
2013-08-29 06:15:45 PM  
Polyester doesn't sound genre defying, guess we had to pad a list.
 
2013-08-29 06:18:57 PM  

Delawheredad: They forgot the biggest one of all: contact with alien life. The universe is so vast that even in a  universe teeming with intelligent life  (a BIG if) the chances of any other life having the ability to even contact us is virtually nil. The idea of traveling from one star system to another even factoring in faster than life transportation would take such a long time as to be practically impossible. In short we will never meet Mr Spock and there will never be a "galactic empire or a "rebel alliance.'


It doesn't help that we live in a galactic backwater.
 
2013-08-29 06:20:44 PM  

Delawheredad: They forgot the biggest one of all: contact with alien life. The universe is so vast that even in a  universe teeming with intelligent life  (a BIG if) the chances of any other life having the ability to even contact us is virtually nil. The idea of traveling from one star system to another even factoring in faster than life transportation would take such a long time as to be practically impossible. In short we will never meet Mr Spock and there will never be a "galactic empire or a "rebel alliance.'


fluffy2097: And the missed the fact that we recently found out we will never be able teleport living matter.

/no star trek teleporters.


I think it's still way too soon to write either of these off just yet. While it may seem that we have enough data to say these things could never happen, the truth is we don't. Our understanding of physics and the viability of life elsewhere is nowhere near as thorough and complete as some scientists like to convince people it is.
 
2013-08-29 06:21:20 PM  
Two words, Positronic Brain.  I know, not so much a dead genre, but I always felt that Asimov got jacked out of a naming opportunity when the media decided to run with "electronic brain".
 
2013-08-29 06:22:36 PM  
...and yes, I understand that "electronic" is more fitting.
 
2013-08-29 06:24:42 PM  

Delawheredad: They forgot the biggest one of all: contact with alien life. The universe is so vast that even in a  universe teeming with intelligent life  (a BIG if) the chances of any other life having the ability to even contact us is virtually nil. The idea of traveling from one star system to another even factoring in faster than life transportation would take such a long time as to be practically impossible. In short we will never meet Mr Spock and there will never be a "galactic empire or a "rebel alliance.'


I disagree with this one completely.  Just based on the math it's a virtual certainty that there are advanced civilizations elsewhere in the universe.  As for traveling from system to system, FTL travel is theoretically possible, and once that barrier has been broken, there's no real limit to how much faster than light we can go.

Will we see any of it in our lifetimes?  Probably not likely, but who knows, someday...
 
2013-08-29 06:27:12 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: FTL travel is theoretically possible, and once that barrier has been broken, there's no real limit to how much faster than light we can go.


Wow.
 
2013-08-29 06:30:36 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: TuteTibiImperes: FTL travel is theoretically possible, and once that barrier has been broken, there's no real limit to how much faster than light we can go.

Wow.


What's incorrect about that statement?  There are theories that work out for FTL travel on paper right now, they just aren't anywhere near practical or possible with current technology.

People that doubt we can do anything with enough time, investment, and effort are the biggest problem in science.  We need to get the attitude back that made the Apollo program possible.
 
2013-08-29 06:31:05 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: Delawheredad: They forgot the biggest one of all: contact with alien life. The universe is so vast that even in a  universe teeming with intelligent life  (a BIG if) the chances of any other life having the ability to even contact us is virtually nil. The idea of traveling from one star system to another even factoring in faster than life transportation would take such a long time as to be practically impossible. In short we will never meet Mr Spock and there will never be a "galactic empire or a "rebel alliance.'

I disagree with this one completely.  Just based on the math it's a virtual certainty that there are advanced civilizations elsewhere in the universe.  As for traveling from system to system, FTL travel is theoretically possible, and once that barrier has been broken, there's no real limit to how much faster than light we can go.

Will we see any of it in our lifetimes?  Probably not likely, but who knows, someday...


This isn't true. No evidence has ever been put forth that it's possible to travel faster than light. In fact every thing they've ever done to try it has done more to prove it's likely impossible.

Not to say there isn't hope. The true nature of space/time is starting to be understood more and more, and it may someday become possible to travel from one point to another via something such as teleportation or wormholes. Remember that space isn't a flat plane, it can fold, bend, and be manipulated. But you still wouldn't be traveling faster than a light particle, just taking a shortcut.
 
2013-08-29 06:32:07 PM  

Honest Bender: Silverstaff: 64 GB Micro-SD cards, 5 of them would store the big 300 GB he was carrying in the movie.

The data wasn't stored on a memory stick shoved into his brain. It was stored IN his brain.


I know, but I was stating that surreptitiously storing 300 GB in a human cranium, if necessary, can already be done a lot more safely and reliably than in that movie.  The wetware interface is something that's still very experimental and limited nowadays, but achieving the basic goal of covert storage and transportation of 300 GB of data using a human courier is quite possible already.
 
2013-08-29 06:35:34 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: TuteTibiImperes: FTL travel is theoretically possible, and once that barrier has been broken, there's no real limit to how much faster than light we can go.

Wow.


My god its full of snark!
data.whicdn.com
 
2013-08-29 06:38:33 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: What's incorrect about that statement?


You're joking.

TuteTibiImperes: There are theories that work out for FTL travel on paper right now,


About as much a "theory" as me making a spreadsheet calculating my yearly income if I earned a million dollars a second. Sure, we can multiply numbers together, and?

TuteTibiImperes: they just aren't anywhere near practical or possible with current technology.


Since you don't even have a physics to back you up, that should not be surprising. What's the difference between you and someone talking about phlogiston?

TuteTibiImperes: People that doubt we can do anything with enough time, investment, and effort are the biggest problem in science.


People that think anything is possible are far worse. You aren't even talking science, you child.

How old are you, seriously?
 
2013-08-29 06:42:15 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: FTL travel is theoretically possible


TuteTibiImperes: What's incorrect about that statement? There are theories that work out for FTL travel on paper right now, they just aren't anywhere near practical or possible with current technology.


They require magical materials we do not even have theories on how to create, requires more energy to operate then released by the Tsar Bomba, by orders of magnitude, and when you entered FTL, you would obliterate the solar system you left from, then obliterate whatever solar system you arrive at as well.

/at least, that what the math says.
 
2013-08-29 06:42:19 PM  

Esroc: TuteTibiImperes: Delawheredad: They forgot the biggest one of all: contact with alien life. The universe is so vast that even in a  universe teeming with intelligent life  (a BIG if) the chances of any other life having the ability to even contact us is virtually nil. The idea of traveling from one star system to another even factoring in faster than life transportation would take such a long time as to be practically impossible. In short we will never meet Mr Spock and there will never be a "galactic empire or a "rebel alliance.'

I disagree with this one completely.  Just based on the math it's a virtual certainty that there are advanced civilizations elsewhere in the universe.  As for traveling from system to system, FTL travel is theoretically possible, and once that barrier has been broken, there's no real limit to how much faster than light we can go.

Will we see any of it in our lifetimes?  Probably not likely, but who knows, someday...

This isn't true. No evidence has ever been put forth that it's possible to travel faster than light. In fact every thing they've ever done to try it has done more to prove it's likely impossible.

Not to say there isn't hope. The true nature of space/time is starting to be understood more and more, and it may someday become possible to travel from one point to another via something such as teleportation or wormholes. Remember that space isn't a flat plane, it can fold, bend, and be manipulated. But you still wouldn't be traveling faster than a light particle, just taking a shortcut.


timenerdworld.files.wordpress.com



There are workable theories but they require things we need to invent first.
 
2013-08-29 06:43:00 PM  
Besides, FTL travel isn't even a requirement for interstellar expansion. It's only a requirement if you, the individual, want to be the one to step foot on an alien world.

Economic cost aside, it's perfectly within our technologic ability to send generational ships into the stars to populate other worlds or meet extra-terrestrials. The only hangup is finding a suitable planet to toss the ship at.
 
2013-08-29 06:45:07 PM  

Esroc: Besides, FTL travel isn't even a requirement for interstellar expansion. It's only a requirement if you, the individual, want to be the one to step foot on an alien world.

Economic cost aside, it's perfectly within our technologic ability to send generational ships into the stars to populate other worlds or meet extra-terrestrials. The only hangup is finding a suitable planet to toss the ship at.


Radiation poisoning is the most significant problem with such a ship. We have ways of dealing with radiation, but it's all rather heavy to boost into low earth orbit, let alone push it to another star.
 
2013-08-29 06:45:45 PM  
TuteTibimperes

  You believe that there are advanced civilizations in the universe because you WANT to believe it. We have nothing other than speculation that there IS intelligent life in the universe. This may in fact be the truth but since we have no blueprint as to how life evolved other than that of our own planet's anything else is pure conjecture. Intelligent life on our planet is the result of several cataclysmic events. Events that may not have occurred elsewhere in  the universe. Look at the dinosaurs. They ruled our planet for millions of years and never developed intelligence. Several mass extinction events had to happen before mammals could take over. Even after that a  staggering number of events had to happen for hominids to evolve. Once hominids evolved another string of unlikely events had to occur for hominids to become self aware and  begin to understand the nature of the universe. We have no way of knowing how things worked elsewhere in the universe but we DO know from the diverse biology of our own planet that intelligence is NOT a necessity for OR a byproduct of life.

 In short, belief in advanced intelligences elsewhere in the universe is akin to an article of religious faith and speculation. It is not based on hard science. The universe MAY indeed be teeming with life but intelligent life on the other hand may very well be scattered like a fine mist throughout the liveable worlds.
 
2013-08-29 06:46:09 PM  
Esroc: Remember that space isn't a flat plane, it can fold, bend, and be manipulated. But you still wouldn't be traveling faster than a light particle, just taking a shortcut.

Most of the time, what people call FTL travel is just such a shortcut. Anything that gets you from here to there faster than a photon traveling the straight line between those two points can be considered as being FTL travel. It doesn't matter how you do it, be it dimensional travel, teleportation, wormhole, subspace, wishing, etc...
 
2013-08-29 06:51:14 PM  

fluffy2097: Esroc: Besides, FTL travel isn't even a requirement for interstellar expansion. It's only a requirement if you, the individual, want to be the one to step foot on an alien world.

Economic cost aside, it's perfectly within our technologic ability to send generational ships into the stars to populate other worlds or meet extra-terrestrials. The only hangup is finding a suitable planet to toss the ship at.

Radiation poisoning is the most significant problem with such a ship. We have ways of dealing with radiation, but it's all rather heavy to boost into low earth orbit, let alone push it to another star.


Well, I've seen on theoretical idea that helps solve that:
Basically, someone pointed out it's *much* easier to transport (And *store*), say, human *genetic material* than human life-forms.

So the basic premise is: "Frozen genetic material, artificial wombs, robots to raise the first generation. Send automated terraforming ships out in advance."
 
2013-08-29 06:53:09 PM  

Felgraf: fluffy2097: Esroc: Besides, FTL travel isn't even a requirement for interstellar expansion. It's only a requirement if you, the individual, want to be the one to step foot on an alien world.

Economic cost aside, it's perfectly within our technologic ability to send generational ships into the stars to populate other worlds or meet extra-terrestrials. The only hangup is finding a suitable planet to toss the ship at.

Radiation poisoning is the most significant problem with such a ship. We have ways of dealing with radiation, but it's all rather heavy to boost into low earth orbit, let alone push it to another star.

Well, I've seen on theoretical idea that helps solve that:
Basically, someone pointed out it's *much* easier to transport (And *store*), say, human *genetic material* than human life-forms.

So the basic premise is: "Frozen genetic material, artificial wombs, robots to raise the first generation. Send automated terraforming ships out in advance."


Or we could get cracking on that space elevator. The money it would save getting shiat into orbit would cover the cost of building it a hundred times over.
 
2013-08-29 06:55:03 PM  

Felgraf: fluffy2097: Esroc: Besides, FTL travel isn't even a requirement for interstellar expansion. It's only a requirement if you, the individual, want to be the one to step foot on an alien world.

Economic cost aside, it's perfectly within our technologic ability to send generational ships into the stars to populate other worlds or meet extra-terrestrials. The only hangup is finding a suitable planet to toss the ship at.

Radiation poisoning is the most significant problem with such a ship. We have ways of dealing with radiation, but it's all rather heavy to boost into low earth orbit, let alone push it to another star.

Well, I've seen on theoretical idea that helps solve that:
Basically, someone pointed out it's *much* easier to transport (And *store*), say, human *genetic material* than human life-forms.

So the basic premise is: "Frozen genetic material, artificial wombs, robots to raise the first generation. Send automated terraforming ships out in advance."


Robots don't deal a whole lot better with radiation then humans do, actually.  They would have to be hardened against it (possible now),  or your ship would land, and disgorge a thousand human beings that can do nothing but say  "Read error in education.dbs : (A)bort (R)etry (F)ail

/i think humans raised by nothing but robots would be profoundly farked up.
 
2013-08-29 06:57:48 PM  
FTA: In the books, the Land of Oz is also a hidden land on Earth as well.

For what it's worth, in the "Emerald City of Oz", Glinda enchants the land to make it invisible and, she claims, unreachable by anyone outside of it. It was in part a reaction by L. Frank Baum to questions from kids asking if these new fangled dirigibles would be able to find Oz. So, as a "fairy land" protected by her magic, it would not show up on satellite scans.
 
2013-08-29 06:59:28 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: TuteTibiImperes: FTL travel is theoretically possible, and once that barrier has been broken, there's no real limit to how much faster than light we can go.

Wow.


That's really deep, QA.  You're so well spoken sometimes.
 
2013-08-29 07:03:12 PM  

PainInTheASP: Two words, Positronic Brain.


i41.photobucket.com
 
2013-08-29 07:11:31 PM  

fluffy2097: Esroc: Besides, FTL travel isn't even a requirement for interstellar expansion. It's only a requirement if you, the individual, want to be the one to step foot on an alien world.

Economic cost aside, it's perfectly within our technologic ability to send generational ships into the stars to populate other worlds or meet extra-terrestrials. The only hangup is finding a suitable planet to toss the ship at.

Radiation poisoning is the most significant problem with such a ship. We have ways of dealing with radiation, but it's all rather heavy to boost into low earth orbit, let alone push it to another star.


You would build the shielding from lunar or asteroid material to avoid the cost of lifting it out of Earth's gravity well.
 
2013-08-29 07:18:17 PM  
Discovery of hard facts hasn't killed religion. Why should it kill other fiction genres?
 
2013-08-29 07:22:02 PM  

thamike: PainInTheASP: Two words, Positronic Brain.


I lolled.
 
2013-08-29 07:24:41 PM  

fluffy2097: Esroc: Besides, FTL travel isn't even a requirement for interstellar expansion. It's only a requirement if you, the individual, want to be the one to step foot on an alien world.

Economic cost aside, it's perfectly within our technologic ability to send generational ships into the stars to populate other worlds or meet extra-terrestrials. The only hangup is finding a suitable planet to toss the ship at.

Radiation poisoning is the most significant problem with such a ship. We have ways of dealing with radiation, but it's all rather heavy to boost into low earth orbit, let alone push it to another star.


Build it from an asteroid or, better yet, a comet. All the mass you need to shield yourselves, plus enough to create a viable long-term colony. Never build anything on Earth for use in space if you can avoid it.
 
2013-08-29 07:26:43 PM  

Silverstaff: I know, but I was stating that surreptitiously storing 300 GB in a human cranium, if necessary, can already be done a lot more safely and reliably than in that movie.


How so?
 
2013-08-29 07:30:20 PM  

Delawheredad: In short, belief in advanced intelligences elsewhere in the universe is akin to an article of religious faith and speculation. It is not based on hard science. The universe MAY indeed be teeming with life but intelligent life on the other hand may very well be scattered like a fine mist throughout the liveable worlds.


It may be speculation but it's not entirely based on faith like religion is. The number of galaxies, not planets but galaxies is so vast it might as well be infinite as far as our puny human brains are concerned. It's not impossible but highly improbable that there isn't intelligent life out there somewhere.

Now whether they were able to break the laws of physics as we know them to reach FTL speed and have the ability or inclination to reach us is another matter.
 
2013-08-29 07:40:14 PM  

Mugato: Delawheredad: In short, belief in advanced intelligences elsewhere in the universe is akin to an article of religious faith and speculation. It is not based on hard science. The universe MAY indeed be teeming with life but intelligent life on the other hand may very well be scattered like a fine mist throughout the liveable worlds.

It may be speculation but it's not entirely based on faith like religion is. The number of galaxies, not planets but galaxies is so vast it might as well be infinite as far as our puny human brains are concerned. It's not impossible but highly improbable that there isn't intelligent life out there somewhere.

Now whether they were able to break the laws of physics as we know them to reach FTL speed and have the ability or inclination to reach us is another matter.


The numbers are pretty dire when you think about it. So, let's say the universe is 150 billion LY wide. And let's suppose for shiats and giggles someday we can move at .99C (cuz, magic)  Even managing to travel across the universe before there no longer is a universe we still would have only explored a tiniest fraction of space. Worse though, I mean, it would take some 100,000 years just to leave our own Galaxy.
The numbers are too big and the physics is too damning. If there is other life out there, the odds are just so poor for us and them ever meeting.

\if we ever do meet, I hope their hot.
 
2013-08-29 07:41:45 PM  

Mugato: Delawheredad: In short, belief in advanced intelligences elsewhere in the universe is akin to an article of religious faith and speculation. It is not based on hard science. The universe MAY indeed be teeming with life but intelligent life on the other hand may very well be scattered like a fine mist throughout the liveable worlds.

It may be speculation but it's not entirely based on faith like religion is. The number of galaxies, not planets but galaxies is so vast it might as well be infinite as far as our puny human brains are concerned. It's not impossible but highly improbable that there isn't intelligent life out there somewhere.

Now whether they were able to break the laws of physics as we know them to reach FTL speed and have the ability or inclination to reach us is another matter.


Not to mention that any race capable of that kind of travel would be so advanced that they've probably come across plenty of barely conscious monkeys on floating rocks threatening each other with nuclear annihilation. We'd be nothing even remotely special to them and they'd likely ignore us. We wouldn't even be useful for slave labor since it'd be akin to training your dog to rebuild an engine.
 
2013-08-29 07:45:00 PM  

Leo Bloom's Freakout: FTA: In the books, the Land of Oz is also a hidden land on Earth as well.

For what it's worth, in the "Emerald City of Oz", Glinda enchants the land to make it invisible and, she claims, unreachable by anyone outside of it. It was in part a reaction by L. Frank Baum to questions from kids asking if these new fangled dirigibles would be able to find Oz. So, as a "fairy land" protected by her magic, it would not show up on satellite scans.


...just like Gorilla City?
 
2013-08-29 07:47:17 PM  

fluffy2097: And the missed the fact that we recently found out we will never be able teleport living matter.

/no star trek teleporters.


We've known that for a while. A teleporter would kill you.
 
2013-08-29 07:50:20 PM  

Esroc: Not to mention that any race capable of that kind of travel would be so advanced that they've probably come across plenty of barely conscious monkeys on floating rocks threatening each other with nuclear annihilation. We'd be nothing even remotely special to them and they'd likely ignore us. We wouldn't even be useful for slave labor since it'd be akin to training your dog to rebuild an engine.


Well I don't know about that. We've taken the time to study every form of life we've discovered, no matter how primitive. And don't sell the human race short. We might be primitive to species that have FTL travel but the space travel we've achieved is nothing to sneeze at. And if they've intercepted our satellite waves I'm sure they'll have an opinion on the Breaking Bad finale.
 
2013-08-29 07:51:41 PM  

Esroc: Not to mention that any race capable of that kind of travel would be so advanced that they've probably come across plenty of barely conscious monkeys on floating rocks threatening each other with nuclear annihilation. We'd be nothing even remotely special to them and they'd likely ignore us. We wouldn't even be useful for slave labor since it'd be akin to training your dog to rebuild an engine.


Pretty much this.  Why would they even want to observe us?  Maybe for fun, who knows ("this is what we were like millions of years ago").  But I highly doubt they'd care to interact with us.

Its akin to my interaction with a house fly.  Maybe I'll swat at it if its really bugging me, but otherwise its a cat toy for the day-and-a-half its alive.
 
2013-08-29 07:53:10 PM  
Most of these don't kill genres if authors are creative enough.

1) no Martian civilization yet, or discovered. You could theorize ruins in the sand or a future civilization existing.

2) there is no nine planet because the definition of planet changed. There are plenty of round balls of mud beyond Pluto for any host of machinations to exist on.

3) knowing the moon doesn't mean fiction can't take place there. Lots of stories still use is cratered surface to spin fantastic tales.

4) Programs can still screw up because of physical limits on the hardware. Those limits are just alot higher than they used to be.

5) life is highly unlikely, and we've only got one example to go by. Its hard to say what isn't out there waiting for us.

6) we're more word of environmental collapse. But overpopulation in the resulting biosphere is still a concern. Not as popular a trope as it used to be, but still.

7) the way we eat pills now you have to wonder if this is still science fiction...

8) not familiar with this one.

9) lots of undiscovered critters out there, especially underwater. But I'll concede that if you want a whole continent of new land then you'll have to get creative of go offworld.
 
2013-08-29 07:55:37 PM  

Delawheredad: The universe MAY indeed be teeming with life but intelligent life on the other hand may very well be scattered like a fine mist throughout the liveable worlds.


"...ancient stars colonized by sentient fungi. Gas giants, inhabited by vast meteorological intelligences, worlds stretched thin across the universe where dimensions intersect...Impossible to describe with our limited vocabulary."
 
2013-08-29 07:55:51 PM  

Mugato: Esroc: Not to mention that any race capable of that kind of travel would be so advanced that they've probably come across plenty of barely conscious monkeys on floating rocks threatening each other with nuclear annihilation. We'd be nothing even remotely special to them and they'd likely ignore us. We wouldn't even be useful for slave labor since it'd be akin to training your dog to rebuild an engine.

Well I don't know about that. We've taken the time to study every form of life we've discovered, no matter how primitive. And don't sell the human race short. We might be primitive to species that have FTL travel but the space travel we've achieved is nothing to sneeze at. And if they've intercepted our satellite waves I'm sure they'll have an opinion on the Breaking Bad finale.


Remember, they'll first get "Your Show of Shows"... and then The Beatles... and then WTF, turn the spaceship around, these people are farked!

/I kid
//Kinda
 
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