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(NPR)   Eight years after Katrina, Lower Ninth residents share their tales of modern-day pioneering. Gulf of Mexico thinks that's adorable, gets ready to share another 14 feet of water with them   (npr.org) divider line 14
    More: Followup, Gulf of Mexico, Steve Inskeep, Lower Ninth Ward, Morning Edition, New Orleans  
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5827 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Aug 2013 at 11:15 AM (51 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2013-08-29 11:32:30 AM
3 votes:
Compare and contrast how the gov responded to Hurricane Katrina with the way it responded to Hurricane Sandy.

Katrina:  "Poor people who built in a flood zone because that's all they could afford?  They never should have been in a known flood zone in the first place.  Fark 'em."

Sandy: "Rich people who built houses on sand 15 feet from the Atlantic Ocean?  OMG! Something has to be done immediately to rebuilt the vacation mansions(at public expense) of millionaire jerb creators!"

/It's not about race.
2013-08-29 11:25:28 AM
3 votes:
Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.
2013-08-29 11:36:14 AM
2 votes:

meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster. The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town. They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.


Well, for the sake of argument, the Corps swears that the levees really up to standards now.

Something important to remember:  New Orleans wasn't hit by a Cat 5 storm that caused the levees to fail. Katrina was a strong Cat 3 at landfall, and it sideswiped Nola.  Some of the levees (actually, flood walls) that failed along the canals had high water that was pushed there by Cat-2-strength winds.  A failure in engineering led to the flooding. Had the flood walls held, New Orleans would have suffered some damage, but would have been back in business in a few days.
2013-08-29 02:15:50 PM
1 votes:

Fissile: Compare and contrast how the gov responded to Hurricane Katrina with the way it responded to Hurricane Sandy.

Katrina:  "Poor people who built in a flood zone because that's all they could afford?  They never should have been in a known flood zone in the first place.  Fark 'em."

Sandy: "Rich people who built houses on sand 15 feet from the Atlantic Ocean?  OMG! Something has to be done immediately to rebuilt the vacation mansions(at public expense) of millionaire jerb creators!"

/It's not about race.


As someone who has lived on the Jersey Shore for most of my life and lives a mile from Mantaloking, where Sandy (arguably) did the most damage, not everyone here is rich.  My neighbors and I certainly aren't.  The people who lived in Camp Osborne most definitely weren't.  Most of the homes that were destroyed were built anytime between the 50s-70s, probably as vacation homes.  Over the decades, they've become homes to middle- and lower-income (Seaside has a lot of year-round lower-income houses & apartments) people.

It's not about money or race, it's about organization, deployment of resources, and planning.  Christie is doing a fantastic job with all 3.  Everyone involved w/Katrina?  Not so much.
2013-08-29 01:59:47 PM
1 votes:

flondrix: I think it comes down to this:  The Dutch are competent enough to settle land below sea level.  Americans are not.

Also, though, we need to restore some of the marshy areas way out from shore that used to provide a "damper" for storm surges.


It's not about competence. We Americans can build whatever the fark we want wherever the fark we want it. The problem is that we are also the most corrupt morally bankrupt people on the face of the planet. So, maintenance funds to keep that shiat from sinking into the swamp get stolen.
2013-08-29 01:21:23 PM
1 votes:
I don't know about the Lower Ninth Ward side of the industrial canal but the areas that flooded on the other side have turned into hipster central. And I don't mean a few people walking around in skinny jeans. It's wall to wall PBR and fixies. If I had bought a dozen homes in Bywater after Katrina and flipped them in the last couple of years, I'd be able to retire rich.
2013-08-29 12:45:24 PM
1 votes:
There comes a time where maybe, just maybe we should reevaluate where we put homes and structures.

I think the Earth is trying to send us a message....just saying
2013-08-29 12:45:22 PM
1 votes:

flondrix: Also, though, we need to restore some of the marshy areas way out from shore that used to provide a "damper" for storm surges.


There is a lawsuit against Big Oil to pay for at least some of the damage they caused those wetlands over the years. Guess who has publicly opposed it?

Gov. Jindal (R).
2013-08-29 12:16:34 PM
1 votes:
Fissile:

/It's not about race.

Correct. 
Its about money.
2013-08-29 11:46:18 AM
1 votes:

Onkel Buck: detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.

But if this scenario were to happen again, maybe they'd realize waiting around for welfare checks with imminent danger approaching is not the best decision.  But then again, maybe not.

Never underestimate the power of learned helplessness


Oh yeah, being already impoverished in a destroyed city with a destroyed economy is totally a situation you can resolve your sudden homelessness in.
2013-08-29 11:44:32 AM
1 votes:
Ok, CSB time.  I attended a conference in Gulfport, Mississippi just before the hurricane onslaughts of 2004 and '05.  Hotel for guests was connected with a walkway across US 90 to a casino.  Which had been built out over the water on floatation devices that were supposedly engineered to rise up, then settle the casino safely back down with any storm surge.

Later, someone sent me a pic of the casino crashed upside down in the middle of US 90.  Presumably, the remains of the hotel were somewhere north of I-10.
2013-08-29 11:37:45 AM
1 votes:

detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.

But if this scenario were to happen again, maybe they'd realize waiting around for welfare checks with imminent danger approaching is not the best decision.  But then again, maybe not.


Never underestimate the power of learned helplessness
2013-08-29 11:37:32 AM
1 votes:

meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.


How are these people suppose to maintain a house in a nicer area of New Orleans?
2013-08-29 11:34:34 AM
1 votes:
LOL 8 years later they still havent moved? Stupid is as stupid does.
 
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