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(NPR)   Eight years after Katrina, Lower Ninth residents share their tales of modern-day pioneering. Gulf of Mexico thinks that's adorable, gets ready to share another 14 feet of water with them   ( npr.org) divider line
    More: Followup, Gulf of Mexico, Steve Inskeep, Lower Ninth Ward, Morning Edition, New Orleans  
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5860 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Aug 2013 at 11:15 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



79 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-08-29 11:20:31 AM  
What percentage of them think Obama was responsible for the government's slow response?
 
2013-08-29 11:23:18 AM  
www.ryanbyrd.net
 
2013-08-29 11:23:42 AM  
kneegrow
 
2013-08-29 11:25:05 AM  

Wellon Dowd: What percentage of them think Obama was responsible for the government's slow response?


Probably more than blame Bush
 
2013-08-29 11:25:28 AM  
Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.
 
2013-08-29 11:28:18 AM  

meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.


But if this scenario were to happen again, maybe they'd realize waiting around for welfare checks with imminent danger approaching is not the best decision.  But then again, maybe not.
 
2013-08-29 11:32:30 AM  
Compare and contrast how the gov responded to Hurricane Katrina with the way it responded to Hurricane Sandy.

Katrina:  "Poor people who built in a flood zone because that's all they could afford?  They never should have been in a known flood zone in the first place.  Fark 'em."

Sandy: "Rich people who built houses on sand 15 feet from the Atlantic Ocean?  OMG! Something has to be done immediately to rebuilt the vacation mansions(at public expense) of millionaire jerb creators!"

/It's not about race.
 
2013-08-29 11:34:34 AM  
LOL 8 years later they still havent moved? Stupid is as stupid does.
 
2013-08-29 11:36:12 AM  
Turn NOLA into a land fill, and farking raise it up a few hundred yards in elevation.
Just pile up trash. pack it down.
Repeat.
 
2013-08-29 11:36:14 AM  

meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster. The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town. They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.


Well, for the sake of argument, the Corps swears that the levees really up to standards now.

Something important to remember:  New Orleans wasn't hit by a Cat 5 storm that caused the levees to fail. Katrina was a strong Cat 3 at landfall, and it sideswiped Nola.  Some of the levees (actually, flood walls) that failed along the canals had high water that was pushed there by Cat-2-strength winds.  A failure in engineering led to the flooding. Had the flood walls held, New Orleans would have suffered some damage, but would have been back in business in a few days.
 
2013-08-29 11:37:32 AM  

meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.


How are these people suppose to maintain a house in a nicer area of New Orleans?
 
2013-08-29 11:37:45 AM  

detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.

But if this scenario were to happen again, maybe they'd realize waiting around for welfare checks with imminent danger approaching is not the best decision.  But then again, maybe not.


Never underestimate the power of learned helplessness
 
2013-08-29 11:38:48 AM  
i.imgur.com
 
2013-08-29 11:39:22 AM  
I really wish I had bought a condo near the French Quarter 3 years ago.  It was a great time to buy.  Too late now for a big gain.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-08-27/new-orleans-rolling-in-cash -s ees-rebirth-real-estate.html
 
2013-08-29 11:39:55 AM  

Fissile: /It's not about race.


Then why was the black people's storm named Katrina, and the white people's storm named Sandy?
 
2013-08-29 11:44:05 AM  

Onkel Buck: detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.

But if this scenario were to happen again, maybe they'd realize waiting around for welfare checks with imminent danger approaching is not the best decision.  But then again, maybe not.

Never underestimate the power of learned helplessness


Never underestimate the man keeping people down.
 
2013-08-29 11:44:25 AM  

vudukungfu: Fissile: /It's not about race.

Then why was the black people's storm named Katrina, and the white people's storm named Sandy?


this
 
2013-08-29 11:44:32 AM  
Ok, CSB time.  I attended a conference in Gulfport, Mississippi just before the hurricane onslaughts of 2004 and '05.  Hotel for guests was connected with a walkway across US 90 to a casino.  Which had been built out over the water on floatation devices that were supposedly engineered to rise up, then settle the casino safely back down with any storm surge.

Later, someone sent me a pic of the casino crashed upside down in the middle of US 90.  Presumably, the remains of the hotel were somewhere north of I-10.
 
2013-08-29 11:44:33 AM  

Wellon Dowd: What percentage of them think Obama was responsible for the government's slow response?


Orleans Parish is very blue

I suspect they remember quite well who was in charge of the catastrophe response--- no one
 
2013-08-29 11:44:53 AM  

Rapmaster2000: I really wish I had bought a condo near the French Quarter 3 years ago.  It was a great time to buy.  Too late now for a big gain.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-08-27/new-orleans-rolling-in-cash -s ees-rebirth-real-estate.html



The rich white business leaders hung out in Dallas during Katrina and decided how they would rebuild the city and run undesirables off.  Real estate was easy to take from people afterwards.
 
2013-08-29 11:46:10 AM  

URAPNIS: meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.

How are these people suppose to maintain a house in a nicer area of New Orleans?


What do you mean, "these people"?
 
2013-08-29 11:46:18 AM  

Onkel Buck: detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.

But if this scenario were to happen again, maybe they'd realize waiting around for welfare checks with imminent danger approaching is not the best decision.  But then again, maybe not.

Never underestimate the power of learned helplessness


Oh yeah, being already impoverished in a destroyed city with a destroyed economy is totally a situation you can resolve your sudden homelessness in.
 
2013-08-29 11:47:01 AM  

mcreadyblue: Onkel Buck: detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.

But if this scenario were to happen again, maybe they'd realize waiting around for welfare checks with imminent danger approaching is not the best decision.  But then again, maybe not.

Never underestimate the power of learned helplessness

Never underestimate the man keeping people down.


Always assume that people will play the victim and make excuses.
 
2013-08-29 11:48:09 AM  

detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.

But if this scenario were to happen again, maybe they'd realize waiting around for welfare checks with imminent danger approaching is not the best decision.  But then again, maybe not.


Yup, every single person in the ninth ward is a welfare sucking leach.

Whatever helps you sleep at night with your false sense of superiority over people that suffered not only a terrible natural disaster , but a flaccid response by every level of government.

Props to you
 
2013-08-29 11:52:23 AM  

IamTomJoad: detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.

But if this scenario were to happen again, maybe they'd realize waiting around for welfare checks with imminent danger approaching is not the best decision.  But then again, maybe not.

Yup, every single person in the ninth ward is a welfare sucking leach.

Whatever helps you sleep at night with your false sense of superiority over people that suffered not only a terrible natural disaster , but a flaccid response by every level of government.

Props to you


You forgot to post your address so we know where we can send some of these folks that still need help
 
2013-08-29 11:55:37 AM  

IamTomJoad: detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster. The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town. They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.

But if this scenario were to happen again, maybe they'd realize waiting around for welfare checks with imminent danger approaching is not the best decision. But then again, maybe not.

Yup, every single person in the ninth ward is a welfare sucking leach.

Whatever helps you sleep at night with your false sense of superiority over people that suffered not only a terrible natural disaster , but a flaccid response by every level of government.

Props to you


Pretty much this.

Also - Pre-Katrina, the 9th Ward (Upper and Lower) had one of the highest/densest concentrations of home ownership among black Americans.
 
2013-08-29 11:57:57 AM  

vudukungfu: Fissile: /It's not about race.

Then why was the black people's storm named Katrina, and the white people's storm named Sandy?


===============

The only Katrina I know is white.  Now if they named it Hurricane Mo'isha ....

Ketrina Keskanich

www.pinkwire.co.uk
 
2013-08-29 12:00:09 PM  

vicejay: IamTomJoad: detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster. The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town. They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.

But if this scenario were to happen again, maybe they'd realize waiting around for welfare checks with imminent danger approaching is not the best decision. But then again, maybe not.

Yup, every single person in the ninth ward is a welfare sucking leach.

Whatever helps you sleep at night with your false sense of superiority over people that suffered not only a terrible natural disaster , but a flaccid response by every level of government.

Props to you

Pretty much this.

Also - Pre-Katrina, the 9th Ward (Upper and Lower) had one of the highest/densest concentrations of home ownership among black Americans.

 
2013-08-29 12:02:57 PM  
What do you call 1 million Democrats living below sea level that can't swim? "Brilliant"

/Larry the Cable Guy
 
2013-08-29 12:03:40 PM  

the_immoral_minority: What do you call 1 million Democrats living below sea level that can't swim? "Brilliant"

/Larry the Cable Guy



Did that guy actually say that?
 
2013-08-29 12:06:54 PM  

Fissile: Compare and contrast how the gov responded to Hurricane Katrina with the way it responded to Hurricane Sandy.

Katrina:  "Poor people who built in a flood zone because that's all they could afford?  They never should have been in a known flood zone in the first place.  Fark 'em."

Sandy: "Rich people who built houses on sand 15 feet from the Atlantic Ocean?  OMG! Something has to be done immediately to rebuilt the vacation mansions(at public expense) of millionaire jerb creators!"

/It's not about race.


Actually, when floods hit the Midwest in 2011, the people who got FEMA money and temporary housing units (AKA FEMA trailers) were under much, much more scrutiny with how dollars were spent and what they were doing to get back in to their homes - and that was all a result of the abuse of funds during Katrina.  In Minot, ND, today is the last day that anyone involved in the flood can be in a THU without buying it.  Some of them in New Orleans were occupied for several years after the event.  Some of the SBA money from Katrina has never been repaid (and nobody prosecuted), and that resulted in incredibly strict rules being placed on folks who have had to go that route during post-Katrina disasters.  This includes the Midwest floods, the Joplin Tornado, the recent Moore tornado, etc.  And where were all of those disasters?  Primarily in locations without a huge minority population.  The only regulations that changed after the Sandy event were how Community Development Block Grant (Disaster Recovery) funds can be spent.  They now allow individual reimbursements for those who rebuild, but the majority of the money has to go to those with low to moderate incomes.  So, no, it's not about race, or how much money people have unless they're poor.
 
2013-08-29 12:10:54 PM  

Fissile: The only Katrina I know is white.


Look out. We got someone with a white friend over here.
 
2013-08-29 12:16:34 PM  
Fissile:

/It's not about race.

Correct. 
Its about money.
 
2013-08-29 12:24:00 PM  

BafflerMeal: the_immoral_minority: What do you call 1 million Democrats living below sea level that can't swim? "Brilliant"

/Larry the Cable Guy


Did that guy actually say that?


Let's see... it's crass, without empathy, plays to an audience of bigots, and bespeaks a level of nuance the performer probably doesn't want people to notice.

I can't say whether he did or not, but it sure passes the sniff test.
 
2013-08-29 12:24:43 PM  

Wellon Dowd: What percentage of them think Obama was responsible for the government's slow response?


29% (of the republicans at least)

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/dana-milbank-embracing-misinf or mation-on-obama/2013/08/27/bb73493a-0f4f-11e3-bdf6-e4fc677d94a1_story. html?tid=rssfeed
 
2013-08-29 12:27:13 PM  
Jesus Christ, this farking thread again? NOLA isn't going anywhere. You'll get over it. Shove your landfills and bulldozers up your asses, then get the hell down here because we still have plenty of cold ones waiting on you.

/NOLA holds no grudges, baby
//Unless you're a Falconite
 
2013-08-29 12:27:26 PM  
i191.photobucket.com
 
2013-08-29 12:28:39 PM  
Must be stories from the people who didn't take the money given to those that moved out then came up to Baton Rouge rented housing until the money ran out trashing whole neighborhoods in the process and then got evicted for failure to pay the rent when the money ran out. You should have seen my sister's neighborhood as her house stood out due to being the only one well maintained. The rest of the homes in the area were dirty with damage and no less than four cars parked in the un-mowed front lawn. She was finally able to sell her home this year and get out of the area. I am just happy that there were no homes for sell or rent in my area during the time period.
 
2013-08-29 12:33:56 PM  
If you rebuild under sea level ... again ... can you imagine my sympathy?
 
2013-08-29 12:34:16 PM  

Joe Blowme: LOL 8 years later they still havent moved? Stupid is as stupid does.


www.slapcaption.com
 
2013-08-29 12:40:15 PM  
I think it comes down to this:  The Dutch are competent enough to settle land below sea level.  Americans are not.

Also, though, we need to restore some of the marshy areas way out from shore that used to provide a "damper" for storm surges.
 
2013-08-29 12:45:22 PM  

flondrix: Also, though, we need to restore some of the marshy areas way out from shore that used to provide a "damper" for storm surges.


There is a lawsuit against Big Oil to pay for at least some of the damage they caused those wetlands over the years. Guess who has publicly opposed it?

Gov. Jindal (R).
 
2013-08-29 12:45:24 PM  
There comes a time where maybe, just maybe we should reevaluate where we put homes and structures.

I think the Earth is trying to send us a message....just saying
 
2013-08-29 01:08:39 PM  

flondrix: I think it comes down to this:  The Dutch are competent enough to settle land below sea level.  Americans are not.

Also, though, we need to restore some of the marshy areas way out from shore that used to provide a "damper" for storm surges.


upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-08-29 01:19:08 PM  

JesseL: flondrix: I think it comes down to this:  The Dutch are competent enough to settle land below sea level.  Americans are not.

Also, though, we need to restore some of the marshy areas way out from shore that used to provide a "damper" for storm surges.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 746x600]


Sure, sure.  And they they actually had the political and  social will to do something good instead of blaming the flooded.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delta_Works
 
2013-08-29 01:19:49 PM  
When I first came here, this was all swamp. Everyone said I was daft to build a castle on a swamp, but I built in all the same, just to show them. It sank into the swamp. So I built a second one. That sank into the swamp. So I built a third. That burned down, fell over, then sank into the swamp. But the fourth one stayed up.

i1.ytimg.com

Here's to you, Lower 9th.
 
2013-08-29 01:21:23 PM  
I don't know about the Lower Ninth Ward side of the industrial canal but the areas that flooded on the other side have turned into hipster central. And I don't mean a few people walking around in skinny jeans. It's wall to wall PBR and fixies. If I had bought a dozen homes in Bywater after Katrina and flipped them in the last couple of years, I'd be able to retire rich.
 
2013-08-29 01:23:42 PM  

JesseL: flondrix: I think it comes down to this:  The Dutch are competent enough to settle land below sea level.  Americans are not.

Also, though, we need to restore some of the marshy areas way out from shore that used to provide a "damper" for storm surges.

[746x600 from http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/82/Watersnoodram p_1953.jpg/746px-Watersnoodramp_1953.jpg image 746x600]


I believe that their unpreparedness for that flood can be blamed in large part on damage to their infrastructure during WWII.  And, as someone else has pointed out, they responded to that disaster by overhauling and improving the dikes.
 
2013-08-29 01:28:21 PM  

BafflerMeal: JesseL: flondrix: I think it comes down to this:  The Dutch are competent enough to settle land below sea level.  Americans are not.

Also, though, we need to restore some of the marshy areas way out from shore that used to provide a "damper" for storm surges.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 746x600]

Sure, sure.  And they they actually had the political and  social will to do something good instead of blaming the flooded.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delta_Works


And it only took them just under 50 years to finish that project.

And then:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_engineering_and_infrastructure_re pa ir_in_New_Orleans_after_Hurricane_Katrina#Future_improvements
In January 2007, the Army Corps of Engineers, after having visited the extensive "Delta Works" levee system in the Netherlands, awarded a $150 million contract to a group of Dutch engineering companies for the evaluation, design and construction management of levees and floodwalls, special closure structures for protection of the communities adjacent to the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, major pumping facilities and planning studies for improved levels of flood protection for New Orleans and southern Louisiana. The Delta Works are a series of constructions built between 1953 and 1997 in the southwest of the Netherlands to protect a large area of land around the Rhine-Meuse-Scheldt delta from the sea. The works consist of dams, sluices, locks, levees, and storm surge barriers. The works were initiated after the North Sea flood of 1953 in which 2,170 people were killed.
Since Katrina, the US, through the Army Corps of Engineers, has made a $14.45 billion investment in the area around New Orleans. Some of the projects include:[2]
 *   The world's largest water pump station (Gulf Intracoastal Waterway West Closure Complex) which can pump 1 million US gallons (3,800 m3) per minute and will cost $1 billion. [3]
*    Hundreds of levee and pump station improvements. [4]
*    The IHNC Lake Borgne Surge Barrier, the longest storm surge barrier in the United States
*    The Seabrook Floodgate, a floodgate at the connection of Lake Ponchartrain with the Industrial Canal
 
2013-08-29 01:57:14 PM  

meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.


The problem is there is just no other place to put them down there. NOLA needs an unskilled work force to work the crappy low end jobs and there is not enough room to move housing for these folks to somewhere else.
 
2013-08-29 01:59:47 PM  

flondrix: I think it comes down to this:  The Dutch are competent enough to settle land below sea level.  Americans are not.

Also, though, we need to restore some of the marshy areas way out from shore that used to provide a "damper" for storm surges.


It's not about competence. We Americans can build whatever the fark we want wherever the fark we want it. The problem is that we are also the most corrupt morally bankrupt people on the face of the planet. So, maintenance funds to keep that shiat from sinking into the swamp get stolen.
 
2013-08-29 02:02:15 PM  

the_immoral_minority: FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:FW:What do you call 1 million Democrats living below sea level that can't swim? "Brilliant"

/Larry the Cable Guy


FTFY
 
2013-08-29 02:02:18 PM  

IdBeCrazyIf: There comes a time where maybe, just maybe we should reevaluate where we put homes and structures.

I think the Earth is trying to send us a message....just saying


I'm all for that, lets let the Mississippi jump it's channel and NOLA can die. In five years it will be another Detroit. Or we could enact new taxes, and build infrastructure to protect people against shiat like this. Oh who am I kidding enact new taxes would annoy the 1%ers and we can't have that.

When does the second American revolution begin? I know where to get a guillotine.
 
2013-08-29 02:14:15 PM  
Also, not exactly off-topic... New Orleans' rebound started with a blocked punt.
 
2013-08-29 02:15:50 PM  

Fissile: Compare and contrast how the gov responded to Hurricane Katrina with the way it responded to Hurricane Sandy.

Katrina:  "Poor people who built in a flood zone because that's all they could afford?  They never should have been in a known flood zone in the first place.  Fark 'em."

Sandy: "Rich people who built houses on sand 15 feet from the Atlantic Ocean?  OMG! Something has to be done immediately to rebuilt the vacation mansions(at public expense) of millionaire jerb creators!"

/It's not about race.


As someone who has lived on the Jersey Shore for most of my life and lives a mile from Mantaloking, where Sandy (arguably) did the most damage, not everyone here is rich.  My neighbors and I certainly aren't.  The people who lived in Camp Osborne most definitely weren't.  Most of the homes that were destroyed were built anytime between the 50s-70s, probably as vacation homes.  Over the decades, they've become homes to middle- and lower-income (Seaside has a lot of year-round lower-income houses & apartments) people.

It's not about money or race, it's about organization, deployment of resources, and planning.  Christie is doing a fantastic job with all 3.  Everyone involved w/Katrina?  Not so much.
 
2013-08-29 02:16:20 PM  

Wellon Dowd: What percentage of them think Obama was responsible for the government's slow response?


I don't know -

media.npr.org

But is that a depiction of Obama as Pope in the above pick from the article?

WTF?
 
2013-08-29 02:27:16 PM  

Amos Quito: Wellon Dowd: What percentage of them think Obama was responsible for the government's slow response?

I don't know -

But is that a depiction of Obama as Pope in the above pick from the article?

WTF?


That's a Mardi Grad Indian. Keep your shiatty politics out of it.
 
2013-08-29 02:28:19 PM  

mooseyfate: Amos Quito: Wellon Dowd: What percentage of them think Obama was responsible for the government's slow response?

I don't know -

But is that a depiction of Obama as Pope in the above pick from the article?

WTF?

That's a Mardi Grad Indian. Keep your shiatty politics out of it.


Mardi Gras, apologies. Autocorrect strikes again.
 
2013-08-29 02:48:07 PM  

mooseyfate: mooseyfate: Amos Quito: Wellon Dowd: What percentage of them think Obama was responsible for the government's slow response?

I don't know -

But is that a depiction of Obama as Pope in the above pick from the article?

WTF?

That's a Mardi Grad Indian. Keep your shiatty politics out of it.

Mardi Gras, apologies. Autocorrect strikes again.



Okay.

Please don't tell Obama that he looks like a Mardi Gras Indian.

/Thanks
 
2013-08-29 02:57:20 PM  

brigid_fitch: Fissile: Compare and contrast how the gov responded to Hurricane Katrina with the way it responded to Hurricane Sandy.

Katrina:  "Poor people who built in a flood zone because that's all they could afford?  They never should have been in a known flood zone in the first place.  Fark 'em."

Sandy: "Rich people who built houses on sand 15 feet from the Atlantic Ocean?  OMG! Something has to be done immediately to rebuilt the vacation mansions(at public expense) of millionaire jerb creators!"

/It's not about race.

As someone who has lived on the Jersey Shore for most of my life and lives a mile from Mantaloking, where Sandy (arguably) did the most damage, not everyone here is rich.  My neighbors and I certainly aren't.  The people who lived in Camp Osborne most definitely weren't.  Most of the homes that were destroyed were built anytime between the 50s-70s, probably as vacation homes.  Over the decades, they've become homes to middle- and lower-income (Seaside has a lot of year-round lower-income houses & apartments) people.

It's not about money or race, it's about organization, deployment of resources, and planning.  Christie is doing a fantastic job with all 3.  Everyone involved w/Katrina?  Not so much.


===============

It's true that most of the shore was middle/working class bungalows years ago...it was that way in the 70s, when I was a kid.   Today anything that has a water view is worth big money.  Unless you inherited the place, you have to be rich.   My rich-biatch cousin bought a house on LBI last year, she paid $1.2 million.
 
2013-08-29 03:08:41 PM  

Slaves2Darkness: It's not about competence. We Americans can build whatever the fark we want wherever the fark we want it. The problem is that we are also the most corrupt morally bankrupt people on the face of the planet. So, maintenance funds to keep that shiat from sinking into the swamp get stolen.


I guess I was calling that a form of competence.  The Dutch have a society that can do that.
 
2013-08-29 03:25:21 PM  
Those are without doubt some of the most ignorant , stupid people that have ever lived. For 3 days the weather service told them to get out and what did they do? Sit on their welfare sucking asses and then have the nerve to complain about being flooded out. OMFG Darwin missed such a chance to clean the gene pool in that sh*thole city.
 
2013-08-29 05:20:37 PM  

tampaflacouple: Those are without doubt some of the most ignorant , stupid people that have ever lived. For 3 days the weather service told them to get out and what did they do? Sit on their welfare sucking asses and then have the nerve to complain about being flooded out. OMFG Darwin missed such a chance to clean the gene pool in that sh*thole city.


We love you, too, Tampa dude/dudette!
 
2013-08-29 05:41:24 PM  

vicejay: Also, not exactly off-topic... New Orleans' rebound started with a blocked punt.


I was there! I presume you were as well. The noise was indescribable. The shared emotions were impossible to explain.

A few people have asked me how one play in one football game could unite a broken and anxious city, and I've never been able to articulate why. I just know it did.
 
2013-08-29 05:49:42 PM  

tampaflacouple: Those are without doubt some of the most ignorant , stupid people that have ever lived. For 3 days the weather service told them to get out and what did they do? Sit on their welfare sucking asses and then have the nerve to complain about being flooded out. OMFG Darwin missed such a chance to clean the gene pool in that sh*thole city.


Lol, Tampa? Christ, at least NOLA has a vibrant and unique culture of cuisine, indescribably great music, majestic or funky architecture, and extremely friendly residents.

Lemme guess...the one time you came here you never left Bourbon St. to explore what New Orleans is all about.

It takes a special breed of asshole to come into a Katrina anniversary thread and insult us. So, in a similar vain, go f*ck yourself.
 
2013-08-29 05:53:47 PM  

dickfreckle: tampaflacouple: Those are without doubt some of the most ignorant , stupid people that have ever lived. For 3 days the weather service told them to get out and what did they do? Sit on their welfare sucking asses and then have the nerve to complain about being flooded out. OMFG Darwin missed such a chance to clean the gene pool in that sh*thole city.

Lol, Tampa? Christ, at least NOLA has a vibrant and unique culture of cuisine, indescribably great music, majestic or funky architecture, and extremely friendly residents.

Lemme guess...the one time you came here you never left Bourbon St. to explore what New Orleans is all about.

It takes a special breed of asshole to come into a Katrina anniversary thread and insult us. So, in a similar vain, go f*ck yourself.


He lives in Florida, man, give him a break. The only thing he has to look forward to his a new batch of meth and the sweet release of death. I, for one, invite him to come get twisted and funky on Frenchman Street. Sounds like he needs it more than we do.
 
2013-08-29 06:28:31 PM  

Slaves2Darkness: Or we could enact new taxes, and build infrastructure to protect people against shiat like this.


Don't be silly. Tax money is for building new NFL stadiums with all the profit going to the billionaire owner. Infrastructure projects are socialism for sissies who hate sports.
 
2013-08-29 06:40:09 PM  

JesseL: BafflerMeal: JesseL: flondrix: I think it comes down to this:  The Dutch are competent enough to settle land below sea level.  Americans are not.

Also, though, we need to restore some of the marshy areas way out from shore that used to provide a "damper" for storm surges.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 746x600]

Sure, sure.  And they they actually had the political and  social will to do something good instead of blaming the flooded.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delta_Works

And it only took them just under 50 years to finish that project.

And then:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_engineering_and_infrastructure_re pa ir_in_New_Orleans_after_Hurricane_Katrina#Future_improvements
In January 2007, the Army Corps of Engineers, after having visited the extensive "Delta Works" levee system in the Netherlands, awarded a $150 million contract to a group of Dutch engineering companies for the evaluation, design and construction management of levees and floodwalls, special closure structures for protection of the communities adjacent to the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, major pumping facilities and planning studies for improved levels of flood protection for New Orleans and southern Louisiana. The Delta Works are a series of constructions built between 1953 and 1997 in the southwest of the Netherlands to protect a large area of land around the Rhine-Meuse-Scheldt delta from the sea. The works consist of dams, sluices, locks, levees, and storm surge barriers. The works were initiated after the North Sea flood of 1953 in which 2,170 people were killed.
Since Katrina, the US, through the Army Corps of Engineers, has made a $14.45 billion investment in the area around New Orleans. Some of the projects include:[2]
 *   The world's largest water pump station (Gulf Intracoastal Waterway West Closure Complex) which can pump 1 million US gallons (3,800 m3) per minute and will cost $1 billion. [3]
*    Hundreds of levee and pump station improvements. [4]
*    The IHNC Lake Borgne ...


I was actually watching something on the Discovery channel last night(I think it was DC) about that. The surge wall they're building is kind of impressive. Also, apparently Brad Pitt donated a bunch of money to help rebuild the Lower 9th. It's not just putting houses back up either but engineering them(and the surrounding infrastructure) to withstand future flooding.
 
2013-08-29 08:15:06 PM  

MechaPyx: JesseL: BafflerMeal: JesseL: flondrix: I think it comes down to this:  The Dutch are competent enough to settle land below sea level.  Americans are not.

Also, though, we need to restore some of the marshy areas way out from shore that used to provide a "damper" for storm surges.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 746x600]

Sure, sure.  And they they actually had the political and  social will to do something good instead of blaming the flooded.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delta_Works

And it only took them just under 50 years to finish that project.

And then:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_engineering_and_infrastructure_re pa ir_in_New_Orleans_after_Hurricane_Katrina#Future_improvements
In January 2007, the Army Corps of Engineers, after having visited the extensive "Delta Works" levee system in the Netherlands, awarded a $150 million contract to a group of Dutch engineering companies for the evaluation, design and construction management of levees and floodwalls, special closure structures for protection of the communities adjacent to the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, major pumping facilities and planning studies for improved levels of flood protection for New Orleans and southern Louisiana. The Delta Works are a series of constructions built between 1953 and 1997 in the southwest of the Netherlands to protect a large area of land around the Rhine-Meuse-Scheldt delta from the sea. The works consist of dams, sluices, locks, levees, and storm surge barriers. The works were initiated after the North Sea flood of 1953 in which 2,170 people were killed.
Since Katrina, the US, through the Army Corps of Engineers, has made a $14.45 billion investment in the area around New Orleans. Some of the projects include:[2]
 *   The world's largest water pump station (Gulf Intracoastal Waterway West Closure Complex) which can pump 1 million US gallons (3,800 m3) per minute and will cost $1 billion. [3]
*    Hundreds of levee and pump station improvements. [4]
*    The IHNC Lake Borgne ...

I was actually watching something on the Discovery channel last night(I think it was DC) about that. The surge wall they're building is kind of impressive. Also, apparently Brad Pitt donated a bunch of money to help rebuild the Lower 9th. It's not just putting houses back up either but engineering them(and the surrounding infrastructure) to withstand future flooding.


Which is why the "bulldoze it!" morans piss me off so much. Yeah, why bother fixing what was obviously broke BEFORE Katrina was even a stiff breeze, let's displace hundreds of thousands of people and destroy centuries of culture and architecture because poor people/black people. Anyone that truly believes that deserves every bad thing that ever has and ever will happen to them. Ridiculous.
 
2013-08-29 08:23:23 PM  

MechaPyx: It's not just putting houses back up either but engineering them(and the surrounding infrastructure) to withstand future flooding.


And then putting it all under the careful supervision of some of the most corrupt and incompetent public officials ever to hold office in the US.
 
2013-08-29 08:30:45 PM  

Gulper Eel: MechaPyx: It's not just putting houses back up either but engineering them(and the surrounding infrastructure) to withstand future flooding.

And then putting it all under the careful supervision of some of the most corrupt and incompetent public officials ever to hold office in the US.


So because politicians are corrupt(thanks for pointing that one out captain obvious) we shouldn't try to fix things?
 
2013-08-29 08:46:37 PM  

MechaPyx: Gulper Eel: MechaPyx: It's not just putting houses back up either but engineering them(and the surrounding infrastructure) to withstand future flooding.

And then putting it all under the careful supervision of some of the most corrupt and incompetent public officials ever to hold office in the US.

So because politicians are corrupt(thanks for pointing that one out captain obvious) we shouldn't try to fix things?


Shouldn't even try. Burn down the entire United States and start from the ground up. It's the American Way!
 
2013-08-29 09:48:51 PM  

MechaPyx: Gulper Eel: MechaPyx: It's not just putting houses back up either but engineering them(and the surrounding infrastructure) to withstand future flooding.

And then putting it all under the careful supervision of some of the most corrupt and incompetent public officials ever to hold office in the US.

So because politicians are corrupt(thanks for pointing that one out captain obvious) we shouldn't try to fix things?



They're the ones who spent 40 years whistling past the graveyard after the previous hurricane hit. Who are you to assume anything will be fixed when they've already demonstrated they will mismanage even the authority whose task is to make sure that Old Man River doesn't jump its banks and drown everybody?

We're to trust them with a multi-billion-dollar infrastructure project why? Because they re-titled a bunch of patronage jobs and kept the purse-string power to themselves? Even assuming a certain level of turnover with the more obvious embarrassments kicked out, what makes them Vermont all of a sudden?

The correct move was to cut those thieving fark Louisiana politicians off from the gravy train, and cut a mess of checks for people to GTFO and move somewhere sustainable.

New Orleans' number one reason to exist is shipping. Not music, or food, or conventions, or sports, or titty bars.
 
2013-08-30 03:10:02 AM  

tampaflacouple: Those are without doubt some of the most ignorant , stupid people that have ever lived. For 3 days the weather service told them to get out and what did they do? Sit on their welfare sucking asses and then have the nerve to complain about being flooded out. OMFG Darwin missed such a chance to clean the gene pool in that sh*thole city.


img.fark.net

/obligatory
//Was in Tampa last year when the Saints kicked the Bucs ass. Fans were azzhats.
 
2013-08-30 07:30:44 AM  
was down as part of federal assistance
the only things worth helping were the pets
 the elected offal were doing their very best to do nothing
and using the situation to their advantage
the people were professional victims
nearby areas were hit just as hard or harder
but they took care of their areas and you never hear about them.
Fark nola
 
2013-08-30 09:28:02 AM  

natas6.0: was down as part of federal assistance
the only things worth helping were the pets
 the elected offal were doing their very best to do nothing
and using the situation to their advantage
the people were professional victims
nearby areas were hit just as hard or harder
but they took care of their areas and you never hear about them.
Fark nola


So, wait. Let me get this straight. The media decides that THEY are going to focus on New Orleans instead of surrounding areas, so it's NOLA resident's fault? How does that work?
 
2013-08-30 11:18:43 AM  
From Photographer Frank Relle:

"I had never been to the lower 9th ward before the storm. After, I was wandering the streets at night looking at the evidence. The National Guard had the neighborhood blocked off; I drove around the barricades and felt like a trespasser for more than that reason. I had been lighting and photographing houses at night in the old parts of the city for the past year and half and now these houses had a story to tell. After I lit this one up with bright gold lights, I unplugged my power to give a moment of respect. The moon was rising and with all the city lights out I saw the home illuminated with the cool blue lunar glow. I made this photograph with mostly moonlight. Katrina gave my photographs recognition, a recognition I desired but it's always been a strange feeling juxtaposed with all the people and memories she took away."

i.imgur.com
 
2013-08-30 12:39:23 PM  

Fissile: brigid_fitch: Fissile: Compare and contrast how the gov responded to Hurricane Katrina with the way it responded to Hurricane Sandy.

Katrina:  "Poor people who built in a flood zone because that's all they could afford?  They never should have been in a known flood zone in the first place.  Fark 'em."

Sandy: "Rich people who built houses on sand 15 feet from the Atlantic Ocean?  OMG! Something has to be done immediately to rebuilt the vacation mansions(at public expense) of millionaire jerb creators!"

/It's not about race.

As someone who has lived on the Jersey Shore for most of my life and lives a mile from Mantaloking, where Sandy (arguably) did the most damage, not everyone here is rich.  My neighbors and I certainly aren't.  The people who lived in Camp Osborne most definitely weren't.  Most of the homes that were destroyed were built anytime between the 50s-70s, probably as vacation homes.  Over the decades, they've become homes to middle- and lower-income (Seaside has a lot of year-round lower-income houses & apartments) people.

It's not about money or race, it's about organization, deployment of resources, and planning.  Christie is doing a fantastic job with all 3.  Everyone involved w/Katrina?  Not so much.

===============

It's true that most of the shore was middle/working class bungalows years ago...it was that way in the 70s, when I was a kid.   Today anything that has a water view is worth big money.  Unless you inherited the place, you have to be rich.   My rich-biatch cousin bought a house on LBI last year, she paid $1.2 million.


So your focus group for this decision ("it's all about the money") is a group of exactly 1 person?  Gotcha.  I have a 13-room house across the street from the Metedeconk River.  My house was appraised last year at around $410K (and I only paid $200K in 1999).  See how far a focus group of 1 gets you?

Yes, there are (or, in most cases now, were) some huge, multi-million dollar homes along the ocean.  But those are the ones RIGHT along the ocean.  Just a block or so in, there were many, MANY more converted bungalows & single-family homes that were probably in the $200-$300K range.  Sandy broke through Mantoloking Beach, washed away most of those huge mansions, destroyed Rte. 35, and let the ocean sweep up Mantoloking Road nearly a mile.  Those were my middle- or working-class neighbors who lost their homes or are trying to rebuild.
 
2013-08-30 05:20:45 PM  

some_beer_drinker: vudukungfu: Fissile: /It's not about race.

Then why was the black people's storm named Katrina, and the white people's storm named Sandy?

this


I don't get it. Both names are white as hell. Katrina is for sure, and Sandy sounds like a Middle aged motherly sort of white woman of English or Irish descent.
Waitaminnit... You are one of those kooks who wants "Black-sounding" Hurricane names, aren't you?

I get that you want to champion equality and all, but should you REALLY be trying to associate a specific group with super destructive forces of nature?

/Can we stop yelling "Racist!" over every little thing?
//Yeah, I'm talkin' to you too, caucasians.
 
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