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(NPR)   Eight years after Katrina, Lower Ninth residents share their tales of modern-day pioneering. Gulf of Mexico thinks that's adorable, gets ready to share another 14 feet of water with them   (npr.org) divider line 79
    More: Followup, Gulf of Mexico, Steve Inskeep, Lower Ninth Ward, Morning Edition, New Orleans  
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5827 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Aug 2013 at 11:15 AM (52 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-29 11:20:31 AM
What percentage of them think Obama was responsible for the government's slow response?
 
2013-08-29 11:23:18 AM
www.ryanbyrd.net
 
2013-08-29 11:23:42 AM
kneegrow
 
2013-08-29 11:25:05 AM

Wellon Dowd: What percentage of them think Obama was responsible for the government's slow response?


Probably more than blame Bush
 
2013-08-29 11:25:28 AM
Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.
 
2013-08-29 11:28:18 AM

meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.


But if this scenario were to happen again, maybe they'd realize waiting around for welfare checks with imminent danger approaching is not the best decision.  But then again, maybe not.
 
2013-08-29 11:32:30 AM
Compare and contrast how the gov responded to Hurricane Katrina with the way it responded to Hurricane Sandy.

Katrina:  "Poor people who built in a flood zone because that's all they could afford?  They never should have been in a known flood zone in the first place.  Fark 'em."

Sandy: "Rich people who built houses on sand 15 feet from the Atlantic Ocean?  OMG! Something has to be done immediately to rebuilt the vacation mansions(at public expense) of millionaire jerb creators!"

/It's not about race.
 
2013-08-29 11:34:34 AM
LOL 8 years later they still havent moved? Stupid is as stupid does.
 
2013-08-29 11:36:12 AM
Turn NOLA into a land fill, and farking raise it up a few hundred yards in elevation.
Just pile up trash. pack it down.
Repeat.
 
2013-08-29 11:36:14 AM

meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster. The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town. They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.


Well, for the sake of argument, the Corps swears that the levees really up to standards now.

Something important to remember:  New Orleans wasn't hit by a Cat 5 storm that caused the levees to fail. Katrina was a strong Cat 3 at landfall, and it sideswiped Nola.  Some of the levees (actually, flood walls) that failed along the canals had high water that was pushed there by Cat-2-strength winds.  A failure in engineering led to the flooding. Had the flood walls held, New Orleans would have suffered some damage, but would have been back in business in a few days.
 
2013-08-29 11:37:32 AM

meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.


How are these people suppose to maintain a house in a nicer area of New Orleans?
 
2013-08-29 11:37:45 AM

detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.

But if this scenario were to happen again, maybe they'd realize waiting around for welfare checks with imminent danger approaching is not the best decision.  But then again, maybe not.


Never underestimate the power of learned helplessness
 
2013-08-29 11:38:48 AM
i.imgur.com
 
2013-08-29 11:39:22 AM
I really wish I had bought a condo near the French Quarter 3 years ago.  It was a great time to buy.  Too late now for a big gain.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-08-27/new-orleans-rolling-in-cash -s ees-rebirth-real-estate.html
 
2013-08-29 11:39:55 AM

Fissile: /It's not about race.


Then why was the black people's storm named Katrina, and the white people's storm named Sandy?
 
2013-08-29 11:44:05 AM

Onkel Buck: detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.

But if this scenario were to happen again, maybe they'd realize waiting around for welfare checks with imminent danger approaching is not the best decision.  But then again, maybe not.

Never underestimate the power of learned helplessness


Never underestimate the man keeping people down.
 
2013-08-29 11:44:25 AM

vudukungfu: Fissile: /It's not about race.

Then why was the black people's storm named Katrina, and the white people's storm named Sandy?


this
 
2013-08-29 11:44:32 AM
Ok, CSB time.  I attended a conference in Gulfport, Mississippi just before the hurricane onslaughts of 2004 and '05.  Hotel for guests was connected with a walkway across US 90 to a casino.  Which had been built out over the water on floatation devices that were supposedly engineered to rise up, then settle the casino safely back down with any storm surge.

Later, someone sent me a pic of the casino crashed upside down in the middle of US 90.  Presumably, the remains of the hotel were somewhere north of I-10.
 
2013-08-29 11:44:33 AM

Wellon Dowd: What percentage of them think Obama was responsible for the government's slow response?


Orleans Parish is very blue

I suspect they remember quite well who was in charge of the catastrophe response--- no one
 
2013-08-29 11:44:53 AM

Rapmaster2000: I really wish I had bought a condo near the French Quarter 3 years ago.  It was a great time to buy.  Too late now for a big gain.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-08-27/new-orleans-rolling-in-cash -s ees-rebirth-real-estate.html



The rich white business leaders hung out in Dallas during Katrina and decided how they would rebuild the city and run undesirables off.  Real estate was easy to take from people afterwards.
 
2013-08-29 11:46:10 AM

URAPNIS: meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.

How are these people suppose to maintain a house in a nicer area of New Orleans?


What do you mean, "these people"?
 
2013-08-29 11:46:18 AM

Onkel Buck: detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.

But if this scenario were to happen again, maybe they'd realize waiting around for welfare checks with imminent danger approaching is not the best decision.  But then again, maybe not.

Never underestimate the power of learned helplessness


Oh yeah, being already impoverished in a destroyed city with a destroyed economy is totally a situation you can resolve your sudden homelessness in.
 
2013-08-29 11:47:01 AM

mcreadyblue: Onkel Buck: detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.

But if this scenario were to happen again, maybe they'd realize waiting around for welfare checks with imminent danger approaching is not the best decision.  But then again, maybe not.

Never underestimate the power of learned helplessness

Never underestimate the man keeping people down.


Always assume that people will play the victim and make excuses.
 
2013-08-29 11:48:09 AM

detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.

But if this scenario were to happen again, maybe they'd realize waiting around for welfare checks with imminent danger approaching is not the best decision.  But then again, maybe not.


Yup, every single person in the ninth ward is a welfare sucking leach.

Whatever helps you sleep at night with your false sense of superiority over people that suffered not only a terrible natural disaster , but a flaccid response by every level of government.

Props to you
 
2013-08-29 11:52:23 AM

IamTomJoad: detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.

But if this scenario were to happen again, maybe they'd realize waiting around for welfare checks with imminent danger approaching is not the best decision.  But then again, maybe not.

Yup, every single person in the ninth ward is a welfare sucking leach.

Whatever helps you sleep at night with your false sense of superiority over people that suffered not only a terrible natural disaster , but a flaccid response by every level of government.

Props to you


You forgot to post your address so we know where we can send some of these folks that still need help
 
2013-08-29 11:55:37 AM

IamTomJoad: detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster. The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town. They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.

But if this scenario were to happen again, maybe they'd realize waiting around for welfare checks with imminent danger approaching is not the best decision. But then again, maybe not.

Yup, every single person in the ninth ward is a welfare sucking leach.

Whatever helps you sleep at night with your false sense of superiority over people that suffered not only a terrible natural disaster , but a flaccid response by every level of government.

Props to you


Pretty much this.

Also - Pre-Katrina, the 9th Ward (Upper and Lower) had one of the highest/densest concentrations of home ownership among black Americans.
 
2013-08-29 11:57:57 AM

vudukungfu: Fissile: /It's not about race.

Then why was the black people's storm named Katrina, and the white people's storm named Sandy?


===============

The only Katrina I know is white.  Now if they named it Hurricane Mo'isha ....

Ketrina Keskanich

www.pinkwire.co.uk
 
2013-08-29 12:00:09 PM

vicejay: IamTomJoad: detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster. The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town. They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.

But if this scenario were to happen again, maybe they'd realize waiting around for welfare checks with imminent danger approaching is not the best decision. But then again, maybe not.

Yup, every single person in the ninth ward is a welfare sucking leach.

Whatever helps you sleep at night with your false sense of superiority over people that suffered not only a terrible natural disaster , but a flaccid response by every level of government.

Props to you

Pretty much this.

Also - Pre-Katrina, the 9th Ward (Upper and Lower) had one of the highest/densest concentrations of home ownership among black Americans.

 
2013-08-29 12:02:57 PM
What do you call 1 million Democrats living below sea level that can't swim? "Brilliant"

/Larry the Cable Guy
 
2013-08-29 12:03:40 PM

the_immoral_minority: What do you call 1 million Democrats living below sea level that can't swim? "Brilliant"

/Larry the Cable Guy



Did that guy actually say that?
 
2013-08-29 12:06:54 PM

Fissile: Compare and contrast how the gov responded to Hurricane Katrina with the way it responded to Hurricane Sandy.

Katrina:  "Poor people who built in a flood zone because that's all they could afford?  They never should have been in a known flood zone in the first place.  Fark 'em."

Sandy: "Rich people who built houses on sand 15 feet from the Atlantic Ocean?  OMG! Something has to be done immediately to rebuilt the vacation mansions(at public expense) of millionaire jerb creators!"

/It's not about race.


Actually, when floods hit the Midwest in 2011, the people who got FEMA money and temporary housing units (AKA FEMA trailers) were under much, much more scrutiny with how dollars were spent and what they were doing to get back in to their homes - and that was all a result of the abuse of funds during Katrina.  In Minot, ND, today is the last day that anyone involved in the flood can be in a THU without buying it.  Some of them in New Orleans were occupied for several years after the event.  Some of the SBA money from Katrina has never been repaid (and nobody prosecuted), and that resulted in incredibly strict rules being placed on folks who have had to go that route during post-Katrina disasters.  This includes the Midwest floods, the Joplin Tornado, the recent Moore tornado, etc.  And where were all of those disasters?  Primarily in locations without a huge minority population.  The only regulations that changed after the Sandy event were how Community Development Block Grant (Disaster Recovery) funds can be spent.  They now allow individual reimbursements for those who rebuild, but the majority of the money has to go to those with low to moderate incomes.  So, no, it's not about race, or how much money people have unless they're poor.
 
2013-08-29 12:10:54 PM

Fissile: The only Katrina I know is white.


Look out. We got someone with a white friend over here.
 
2013-08-29 12:16:34 PM
Fissile:

/It's not about race.

Correct. 
Its about money.
 
2013-08-29 12:24:00 PM

BafflerMeal: the_immoral_minority: What do you call 1 million Democrats living below sea level that can't swim? "Brilliant"

/Larry the Cable Guy


Did that guy actually say that?


Let's see... it's crass, without empathy, plays to an audience of bigots, and bespeaks a level of nuance the performer probably doesn't want people to notice.

I can't say whether he did or not, but it sure passes the sniff test.
 
2013-08-29 12:24:43 PM

Wellon Dowd: What percentage of them think Obama was responsible for the government's slow response?


29% (of the republicans at least)

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/dana-milbank-embracing-misinf or mation-on-obama/2013/08/27/bb73493a-0f4f-11e3-bdf6-e4fc677d94a1_story. html?tid=rssfeed
 
2013-08-29 12:27:13 PM
Jesus Christ, this farking thread again? NOLA isn't going anywhere. You'll get over it. Shove your landfills and bulldozers up your asses, then get the hell down here because we still have plenty of cold ones waiting on you.

/NOLA holds no grudges, baby
//Unless you're a Falconite
 
2013-08-29 12:27:26 PM
i191.photobucket.com
 
2013-08-29 12:28:39 PM
Must be stories from the people who didn't take the money given to those that moved out then came up to Baton Rouge rented housing until the money ran out trashing whole neighborhoods in the process and then got evicted for failure to pay the rent when the money ran out. You should have seen my sister's neighborhood as her house stood out due to being the only one well maintained. The rest of the homes in the area were dirty with damage and no less than four cars parked in the un-mowed front lawn. She was finally able to sell her home this year and get out of the area. I am just happy that there were no homes for sell or rent in my area during the time period.
 
2013-08-29 12:33:56 PM
If you rebuild under sea level ... again ... can you imagine my sympathy?
 
2013-08-29 12:34:16 PM

Joe Blowme: LOL 8 years later they still havent moved? Stupid is as stupid does.


www.slapcaption.com
 
2013-08-29 12:40:15 PM
I think it comes down to this:  The Dutch are competent enough to settle land below sea level.  Americans are not.

Also, though, we need to restore some of the marshy areas way out from shore that used to provide a "damper" for storm surges.
 
2013-08-29 12:45:22 PM

flondrix: Also, though, we need to restore some of the marshy areas way out from shore that used to provide a "damper" for storm surges.


There is a lawsuit against Big Oil to pay for at least some of the damage they caused those wetlands over the years. Guess who has publicly opposed it?

Gov. Jindal (R).
 
2013-08-29 12:45:24 PM
There comes a time where maybe, just maybe we should reevaluate where we put homes and structures.

I think the Earth is trying to send us a message....just saying
 
2013-08-29 01:08:39 PM

flondrix: I think it comes down to this:  The Dutch are competent enough to settle land below sea level.  Americans are not.

Also, though, we need to restore some of the marshy areas way out from shore that used to provide a "damper" for storm surges.


upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-08-29 01:19:08 PM

JesseL: flondrix: I think it comes down to this:  The Dutch are competent enough to settle land below sea level.  Americans are not.

Also, though, we need to restore some of the marshy areas way out from shore that used to provide a "damper" for storm surges.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 746x600]


Sure, sure.  And they they actually had the political and  social will to do something good instead of blaming the flooded.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delta_Works
 
2013-08-29 01:19:49 PM
When I first came here, this was all swamp. Everyone said I was daft to build a castle on a swamp, but I built in all the same, just to show them. It sank into the swamp. So I built a second one. That sank into the swamp. So I built a third. That burned down, fell over, then sank into the swamp. But the fourth one stayed up.

i1.ytimg.com

Here's to you, Lower 9th.
 
2013-08-29 01:21:23 PM
I don't know about the Lower Ninth Ward side of the industrial canal but the areas that flooded on the other side have turned into hipster central. And I don't mean a few people walking around in skinny jeans. It's wall to wall PBR and fixies. If I had bought a dozen homes in Bywater after Katrina and flipped them in the last couple of years, I'd be able to retire rich.
 
2013-08-29 01:23:42 PM

JesseL: flondrix: I think it comes down to this:  The Dutch are competent enough to settle land below sea level.  Americans are not.

Also, though, we need to restore some of the marshy areas way out from shore that used to provide a "damper" for storm surges.

[746x600 from http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/82/Watersnoodram p_1953.jpg/746px-Watersnoodramp_1953.jpg image 746x600]


I believe that their unpreparedness for that flood can be blamed in large part on damage to their infrastructure during WWII.  And, as someone else has pointed out, they responded to that disaster by overhauling and improving the dikes.
 
2013-08-29 01:28:21 PM

BafflerMeal: JesseL: flondrix: I think it comes down to this:  The Dutch are competent enough to settle land below sea level.  Americans are not.

Also, though, we need to restore some of the marshy areas way out from shore that used to provide a "damper" for storm surges.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 746x600]

Sure, sure.  And they they actually had the political and  social will to do something good instead of blaming the flooded.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delta_Works


And it only took them just under 50 years to finish that project.

And then:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_engineering_and_infrastructure_re pa ir_in_New_Orleans_after_Hurricane_Katrina#Future_improvements
In January 2007, the Army Corps of Engineers, after having visited the extensive "Delta Works" levee system in the Netherlands, awarded a $150 million contract to a group of Dutch engineering companies for the evaluation, design and construction management of levees and floodwalls, special closure structures for protection of the communities adjacent to the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, major pumping facilities and planning studies for improved levels of flood protection for New Orleans and southern Louisiana. The Delta Works are a series of constructions built between 1953 and 1997 in the southwest of the Netherlands to protect a large area of land around the Rhine-Meuse-Scheldt delta from the sea. The works consist of dams, sluices, locks, levees, and storm surge barriers. The works were initiated after the North Sea flood of 1953 in which 2,170 people were killed.
Since Katrina, the US, through the Army Corps of Engineers, has made a $14.45 billion investment in the area around New Orleans. Some of the projects include:[2]
 *   The world's largest water pump station (Gulf Intracoastal Waterway West Closure Complex) which can pump 1 million US gallons (3,800 m3) per minute and will cost $1 billion. [3]
*    Hundreds of levee and pump station improvements. [4]
*    The IHNC Lake Borgne Surge Barrier, the longest storm surge barrier in the United States
*    The Seabrook Floodgate, a floodgate at the connection of Lake Ponchartrain with the Industrial Canal
 
2013-08-29 01:57:14 PM

meanmutton: Honestly, it was farking criminal to be putting people back in the way of another disaster.  The government should have used the money to eminent-domain the entire area, give each family a few hundred thousand dollars for their homes (which was vastly more than they were worth), and help them relocate to the nicer areas of town.  They could then just level the entire area, let nature reclaim it and then they'd have a nice, natural place for the water to flow when the levees inevitably are breached again.


The problem is there is just no other place to put them down there. NOLA needs an unskilled work force to work the crappy low end jobs and there is not enough room to move housing for these folks to somewhere else.
 
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