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(ABC) Video NASA might not still have the budget they used to, but you've gotta admit, the production values of their mission videos have really come a long way since the soundstage era   (abcnews.go.com) divider line 22
    More: Video, NASA, unmanned spacecraft, asteroids, Johnson Space Center  
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2901 clicks; posted to Video » on 28 Aug 2013 at 11:22 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



22 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-08-28 11:20:45 AM  
People keep dumping on NASA but all that money they didn't actually spend went a long way towards funding my $600 million secret government bank account, thank you very much.
 
2013-08-28 11:27:17 AM  
Goddamnit, I got shiat to do today. I can't play KSP for twelve hours, stop making me want to!
 
2013-08-28 11:53:00 AM  
The sad thing is that SLS/Orion is going to have taken 16 years of development by the time Orion first flies around the moon in 2021 with humans. It'll also take 28 years for us to get back to the capability of the Saturn V with SLS when it flies with the J-2X upper stage engines for the first time in 2032. Compare that to the 7 years it took to develop Apollo, and 9 years it took to develop shuttle and you get a sense of why Constellation was cancelled to begin with. So excuse me if I'm not so excited that NASA MAYBE will go to a rock it'll have captured sometime 11 years from now (If the capture an asteroid mission even gets funding).

I'm going to have to suggest we think about dumping SLS/Orion for the Falcon Heavy which flies next year, is less capable than SLS but it will actually exist sooner and if Musk can make the whole reusable rocket stages for the Falcon Heavy work he was dramatically bring the cost of accessing space.
 
2013-08-28 11:58:34 AM  
The "next video" is a story on an asteroid that doesn't threaten Earth.  Did The Onion somehow hijack the ABC News domain name?
 
2013-08-28 12:00:38 PM  
Also, the sound effects for the bag were unnecessary and kinda gross.
 
2013-08-28 12:18:09 PM  

Mentalpatient87: Goddamnit, I got shiat to do today. I can't play KSP for twelve hours, stop making me want to!


Why not?  Seems like that's what everyone's doing at the moment.

i.imgur.com

"We need a heavy lifter version of the Delta IV."

"Fark it, let's just strap three of 'em together and call it a day."

The Jebediah Kerman school of rocket design put into RL practice, folks!  All it needs is some superfluous SRBs and a shiatload of struts and it'd be right at home on the pad at KSC.
 
2013-08-28 12:27:59 PM  
I miss the old watercolor style.
 
2013-08-28 01:20:43 PM  
Why waste money collecting asteroid samples when they'll just arrive on their own anyway. Better start trying to figure out how to stop the larger ones if we want to continue as a species for any length of time.
 
2013-08-28 01:26:49 PM  

WyldKarde: Mentalpatient87: Goddamnit, I got shiat to do today. I can't play KSP for twelve hours, stop making me want to!

Why not?  Seems like that's what everyone's doing at the moment.

[669x1000 from http://i.imgur.com/4d5w3DB.jpg image 669x1000]

"We need a heavy lifter version of the Delta IV."

"Fark it, let's just strap three of 'em together and call it a day."

The Jebediah Kerman school of rocket design put into RL practice, folks!  All it needs is some superfluous SRBs and a shiatload of struts and it'd be right at home on the pad at KSC.


Eh. I much rather have one of these. Three Falcon 9's first stages together. Going to be quite the sight next year.

amyshirateitel.com
 
2013-08-28 01:33:06 PM  
It might look pretty, but that's the result of a few sketches and a graphic design intern. The final product is going to have a Chinese flag on it.
 
2013-08-28 01:48:15 PM  
In any  NASA video, it is unforgivable to depict sound carrying in the vacuum of space.  Otherwise, a nice video.
 
2013-08-28 02:09:51 PM  
In before Space Bevets shiats all over this thread.
 
2013-08-28 02:20:26 PM  

Spaced Cowboy: In before Space Bevets shiats all over this thread.


Heh.  Space Bevets.  I shouldn't still be laughing at that.
 
2013-08-28 03:09:02 PM  
That's cool and all but I'd much rather see teachers paid a living wage.
 
2013-08-28 03:42:19 PM  
FAKE, I can tell by some of shopped pixels.

//am I doing it right.
 
2013-08-28 04:01:51 PM  
Uhm, and why should this involve a manned mission? Not to sound like QA, but manned spaceflight has little point from a scientific perspective.
 
2013-08-28 04:10:22 PM  

The wonderful travels of a turd: Uhm, and why should this involve a manned mission? Not to sound like QA, but manned spaceflight has little point from a scientific perspective.


To shut up assholes like QA and the rest of the twits that keep harping about how we no longer have a space program.
 
2013-08-28 04:13:36 PM  
NASA's budget has been growing rather steadily through the Bush and Obama administrations until the sequester.
 
2013-08-28 05:14:28 PM  

The wonderful travels of a turd: Uhm, and why should this involve a manned mission? Not to sound like QA, but manned spaceflight has little point from a scientific perspective.


There are a lot of benefits to manned spaceflight. On the ISS, they perform experiments that save scientists months or years of research because the microgravity doesn't interfere with the experiment as much as Earth-normal gravity does. With Earth-normal gravity, scientists often have to research a lot more paths than is necessary before they filter out the data to get to where they actually know which direction to take for their next step. Astronaut John Blaha discussed this in reference to experiments he did during his time aboard MIR when my boy and I were at KSC last year.

A lot of the experiments sent up are essentially, "Turn it on at this time, turn it off at this time. Get imagery for us.", so it's not very taxing for the astronauts.

A human is a much better information processor than a dumb robot, which requires instructions to be transmitted to it. Also, many robots are slow because they can't rush ahead blindly - for example the ones on Mars. While they do great work, a human could cover a lot more ground a lot more efficiently because a human can say, "That over there is interesting. I'm going there NOW." instead of waiting for some guys back on Earth to process imagery, argue over where they're going next, set up the commands, send the commands, wait for command-receipt verification and then finally tell the robot to run the commands. A human could have covered a lot more points of interest in the time it took ground controllers to send one set of commands to the robot. The "Genesis Rock" on the Moon was discovered in such a fashion.

Robots definitely have their place, but nothing beats human observation at times. There is room for both aspects in space exploration. Robots are great as initial surveyors.
 
2013-08-28 05:52:54 PM  
Sooo... the way that looked, the astronauts docked with the meteor-catcher spacecraft with a docking port at the "nose" of the capsule.  Then the astronauts did an EVA by opening a side hatch of the capsule.  Does it have an internal airlock, or are they planning on putting all 4 astronauts into pressure suits, depressurize the whole capsule, and have 2 guys spacewalk?

Just struck me as weird.
 
2013-08-29 06:16:29 PM  

rej1138: Sooo... the way that looked, the astronauts docked with the meteor-catcher spacecraft with a docking port at the "nose" of the capsule.  Then the astronauts did an EVA by opening a side hatch of the capsule.  Does it have an internal airlock, or are they planning on putting all 4 astronauts into pressure suits, depressurize the whole capsule, and have 2 guys spacewalk?

Just struck me as weird.


It isn't that weird. The first US spacewalk was made in such a manner, granted with there only being two crew for Gemini. The Apollo landings were the same as well. Shuttle was the first US spacecraft with an airlock.

However, the The Soviets were able to launch two Voskhod capsules before the first manned Gemini was launched.
The Soviets' avionics technology was not as advanced as that of the United States, so the Voskhod cabin could not have been left depressurized by an open hatch; otherwise the air-cooled electronics would have overheated. Therefore a spacewalking cosmonaut would have to enter and exit the spacecraft through an airlock. By contrast, the Gemini capsule's avionics were designed so the cabin could be exposed to the vacuum of space when one of two large hatches was opened, so no airlock was required, and both the spacewalking astronaut has at least his head outside of the spacecraft.


Not mentioned of course is that the Voskhod was a total sham. Sure Russia pulled off the first spacewalk, but they do so almost at the expense of the cosmonaut in question.

As they had with the first satellite and first man in space, the Soviets again stunned the world on March 18, 1965 with the first EVA (commonly referred to as a "space walk") performed by Alexey Leonov from the Voskhod 2 spacecraft, for 12 minutes outside the spacecraft. Leonov had no means to control his motion other than pulling on his 50.7-foot (15.5 m) tether. After the flight, he claimed this was easy, but his space suit ballooned from its internal pressure against the vacuum of space, stiffening so much that he could not activate the shutter on his chest-mounted camera.[3]
At the end of his space walk, the suit stiffening caused a more serious problem: Leonov had to re-enter the capsule through the inflatable cloth airlock, 3.96 feet (1.21 m) in diameter and 8.25 feet (2.51 m) long. After his spacewalk, he improperly entered the airlock head-first and got stuck sideways. He could not get back in without reducing the pressure in his suit, risking "the bends". This added another 12 minutes to his time in vacuum, and he was overheated by 1.8 C (3.2 F) from the exertion. It would be almost four years before the Soviets tried another EVA. They misrepresented to the press how difficult Leonov found it to work in weightlessness and concealed the problems encountered until after the end of the Cold War.


Which I think pretty much makes it clear that the American's were starting to pull ahead in the space race by Gemini and well the rest is history as they say.
 
2013-08-29 06:21:50 PM  
Actually as I think about it I think technically Skylab was the first US spacecraft with an airlock but you know what I meant. >.>
 
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