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(Fuel Fix)   Researchers: Texas fracking is leading to earthquakes up to 4.8 on the Richter scale, which could cause severe damage. Californians tell Texas there are porn shoots in the Valley that register higher than 4.8 so man the fark up   (fuelfix.com) divider line 72
    More: Stupid, Richter scale, earthquakes, Texas, Californians, radiation damages, brackish water, water well, Water pumping  
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1194 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Aug 2013 at 8:12 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



72 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-08-28 08:22:33 AM  
Lies told to keep us from our destiny of squeezing this earth dry and perishing.
 
2013-08-28 08:40:58 AM  
So it's the oil extraction causing the earthquakes, but the method used to extract that oil has nothing to do with it? Okay then, nothing to see here. Move along.
 
2013-08-28 08:41:12 AM  
Subby forgot to read the article:

However, researchers concluded the quakes were not related to hydraulic fracturing, the process of pumping water, sand and chemicals at high pressure to crack open dense shale rock.
 
2013-08-28 08:42:29 AM  

GoodHomer: Subby forgot to read the article:

However, researchers concluded the quakes were not related to hydraulic fracturing, the process of pumping water, sand and chemicals at high pressure to crack open dense shale rock.


I don't think there's a scientific consensus on that.

/teach the controversy
 
2013-08-28 08:47:27 AM  
So...  That was a pretty long article to state that there's no direct connection that they could find other than earthquakes sometimes occur in areas where oil is being produced.
 
2013-08-28 08:48:12 AM  

GoodHomer: Subby forgot to read the article:

However, researchers concluded the quakes were not related to hydraulic fracturing, the process of pumping water, sand and chemicals at high pressure to crack open dense shale rock.


But they also said the increased earthquakes were due to the increase in oil production.  Guess how that increase is happening.
 
2013-08-28 08:59:03 AM  

sno man: GoodHomer: Subby forgot to read the article:

However, researchers concluded the quakes were not related to hydraulic fracturing, the process of pumping water, sand and chemicals at high pressure to crack open dense shale rock.

But they also said the increased earthquakes were due to the increase in oil production.  Guess how that increase is happening.


Our conquering of Iraq?
 
2013-08-28 09:02:33 AM  
Wasn't this a storyline last season on Dallas?
 
2013-08-28 09:04:44 AM  
Why would it matter if oil production was increased?

Wouldn't there be earthquakes regardless of the increase in production?


Have there been increases in the amount of EQs in Saudi Arabia? They are putting more fluid into the ground than they ever have before in order to get the oil out.......it doesn't shoot out like a geyser since there is not enough oil left under pressure, it has to be forced out by pumping fluid into the ground.

What about places like PA or ND? There are huge fracking operations going on there now...shouldn't they be experiencing EQs more frequently also?
 
2013-08-28 09:07:38 AM  

Giltric: Why would it matter if oil production was increased?

Wouldn't there be earthquakes regardless of the increase in production?


Have there been increases in the amount of EQs in Saudi Arabia? They are putting more fluid into the ground than they ever have before in order to get the oil out.......it doesn't shoot out like a geyser since there is not enough oil left under pressure, it has to be forced out by pumping fluid into the ground.

What about places like PA or ND? There are huge fracking operations going on there now...shouldn't they be experiencing EQs more frequently also?


I guess it would depend where the fault lines are? Not a seismologist.

Fracking just seems like a bad idea all around though.
 
2013-08-28 09:11:40 AM  

spman: Wasn't this a storyline last season on Dallas?


They sure screwed that Barnes guy over. Wasn't he more of a buffoon on the old show?


There was a 4.1 in the Sierras the other day, don't think it even rustled the flames on all the wildfires. Earthquakes rustle flames, you know. According to a rule I just made up.
 
2013-08-28 09:16:05 AM  

Giltric: What about places like PA or ND? There are huge fracking operations going on there now...shouldn't they be experiencing EQs more frequently also?


Ohio study a few years ago
 
2013-08-28 09:18:19 AM  
I wonder how many towns in Texas are running out of water due to fracking?
 
2013-08-28 09:20:19 AM  

Giltric: Why would it matter if oil production was increased?

Wouldn't there be earthquakes regardless of the increase in production?


Have there been increases in the amount of EQs in Saudi Arabia? They are putting more fluid into the ground than they ever have before in order to get the oil out.......it doesn't shoot out like a geyser since there is not enough oil left under pressure, it has to be forced out by pumping fluid into the ground.

What about places like PA or ND? There are huge fracking operations going on there now...shouldn't they be experiencing EQs more frequently also?


Ohio seems to think there is a connection
 
2013-08-28 09:23:26 AM  

give me doughnuts: I wonder how many towns in Texas are running out of water due to fracking?


A lot of west Texas never had much (potable) water in the first place.
 
2013-08-28 09:23:40 AM  
Burr:

Giltric: What about places like PA or ND? There are huge fracking operations going on there now...shouldn't they be experiencing EQs more frequently also?

Ohio study a few years ago


Also of interest.

If I'm reading right, it seems it's not so much the oil extraction causing quakes, it's re-injecting the wastewater.

Really, it would be surprising if fracking *didn't* cause earthquakes, since the whole point of the process is to fracture and lubricate rock formations by creating huge hydrological pressure imbalances.
 
2013-08-28 09:24:52 AM  
sno man:
Ohio seems to think there is a connection

That is not the fracking, but the waste water injection wells.
 
2013-08-28 09:25:16 AM  
It's cause Texas sucks.
 
2013-08-28 09:32:05 AM  
It would then stand to reason (by neoluddite anti-fracker if-it-saves-just-one-child's-life standards) that sea-level rise is caused not by climate change, but by all our big tall buildings squeezing the land downward like a stiletto heel on a grape.

We should only build one-story homes out of balsa wood. It's safer.
 
2013-08-28 09:37:20 AM  
I think it's the natural gas industry's goal to crack the whole damn planet in half.

/ great headline by the way
 
2013-08-28 09:38:30 AM  
"I'd like to share a revelation that I've had during my time here. It came to me when I tried to classify your species and I realized that you're not actually mammals. Every mammal on this planet instinctively develops a natural equilibrium with the surrounding environment but you humans do not. You move to an area and you multiply and multiply until every natural resource is consumed and the only way you can survive is to spread to another area. There is another organism on this planet that follows the same pattern. Do you know what it is? A virus. Human beings are a disease, a cancer of this planet. You're a plague."
 
2013-08-28 09:38:36 AM  
Gulper Eel:

It would then stand to reason (by neoluddite anti-fracker if-it-saves-just-one-child's-life standards) that sea-level rise is caused not by climate change, but by all our big tall buildings squeezing the land downward like a stiletto heel on a grape.

We should only build one-story homes out of balsa wood. It's safer.


Just out of curiosity, is that *really* what the voices in your head are telling you other people are thinking?

/ poe's law, sarcasm meter etc...
 
2013-08-28 09:45:00 AM  
You like being warm in the winter? How about a nice hot shower? Not into sushi or steak tar tar? Charging your iPhone or electro weeniemobile? Like that nice light at night around the freshly filtered water in your swimming pool?

Then STFU about gas well Fracking. (dad gum autocorrect!)
 
2013-08-28 09:45:08 AM  
It's Texas. Deep down, no one cares.
 
2013-08-28 09:47:31 AM  

I've lived in the Irving/Las Colinas area for 30 years and we've had no earthquakes until the last 5 years.

. I realize we're turning into Irvine, CA here since In n out arrived and all the East Indians, but I think it's the fracking.
 
2013-08-28 09:47:51 AM  

maxheck: Just out of curiosity, is that *really* what the voices in your head are telling you other people are thinking?


Nah, just the voices in the head of anti-fracker, anti-nuke, and anti-vaxx loon RFK Jr., who must have won some kind of hardcore-green Yahtzee trophy for having that much crazy jammed into one skull.
 
2013-08-28 09:49:58 AM  

Burr: sno man:
Ohio seems to think there is a connection

That is not the fracking, but the waste water injection wells.


The waste water from.... washing dishes? taking baths?
 
2013-08-28 09:50:17 AM  

Gulper Eel: give me doughnuts: I wonder how many towns in Texas are running out of water due to fracking?

A lot of west Texas never had much (potable) water in the first place.


It's the phƲI(ing  cotton pharmers out here, dammnit!! They get paid to fail at farming. It takes a lot of water to fail at growing cotton in the gorram desert, but damn if they're going to stop anytime soon,
 
2013-08-28 09:54:58 AM  
Gulper Eel:

maxheck: Just out of curiosity, is that *really* what the voices in your head are telling you other people are thinking?

Nah, just the voices in the head of anti-fracker, anti-nuke, and anti-vaxx loon RFK Jr., who must have won some kind of hardcore-green Yahtzee trophy for having that much crazy jammed into one skull.


Huh. Didn't know he said that. That's pretty funny.

Also out of curiosity, how relevant do you feel say... Moon Hoaxers are?
 
2013-08-28 09:57:45 AM  

sno man: Burr: sno man:
Ohio seems to think there is a connection

That is not the fracking, but the waste water injection wells.

The waste water from.... washing dishes? taking baths?


There is a difference between the processes, just letting people get all the information.
 
2013-08-28 10:05:57 AM  
Can someone point me to the article that Smitty was referring to?
 
2013-08-28 10:06:21 AM  
I was in NE Ohio in the late 1980's when a quake happened, that was blamed on an injection well. Loud bang and the earth shook. I thought Cleveland got nuked or a truck ran into the building. Wife was home and thought I "left something on" in the spare bedroom. Good times!
 
2013-08-28 10:08:21 AM  

Burr: sno man: Burr: sno man:
Ohio seems to think there is a connection

That is not the fracking, but the waste water injection wells.

The waste water from.... washing dishes? taking baths?

There is a difference between the processes, just letting people get all the information.


I'm all for more information, the more the better.  But those two things are not unrelated, without the former, there would be no latter.
 
2013-08-28 10:11:53 AM  
I thought I was so glad there was no natural gas in Arizona- and that we would be safe from this. But then the light bulb went off and I realized the Colorado is home to oil shale and the headwaters of the river we rely on. All of us - if we include those many many many many farms that grow our food in California. Yes, in the desert.

There has to be a better way. But profits do seem to prevent that, eh?
 
2013-08-28 10:21:23 AM  
Old news is so exciting.  Been happening out south and west of Ft. Worth for quite a while (Cleburne - Burleson corridor).  I posted a link a while back that showed that the number of earthquakes had accelerated significantly.  Let me see if I can find it.
 
2013-08-28 10:21:41 AM  

give me doughnuts: I wonder how many towns in Texas are running out of water due to fracking?


Oil companies are willing to pay more for the water than the farmers. So, yeah, big issue in some areas.

In other news, the profit from the same amount of water used is higher with fracking than the same amount of water used in farming according to at least one Master's thesis I saw at a show.
 
2013-08-28 10:26:24 AM  

RyansPrivates: Old news is so exciting.  Been happening out south and west of Ft. Worth for quite a while (Cleburne - Burleson corridor).  I posted a link a while back that showed that the number of earthquakes had accelerated significantly.  Let me see if I can find it.


Ok.  That was quick.   Here  Starting 5 years ago.  Before that, 35 years ago.  Pretty definitive, since most have been at 5km depth, about the depth of the  fracking (5-7 km)
 
2013-08-28 10:30:30 AM  
I'll say now the same thing I say in most other "red state disaster" threads. fark 'em.

If FedRuled Gubmint money is theft and evil nine days out of ten when it's used to save lives from starvation, exposure and disease, it's theft and evil on the tenth day when it's necessary for saving lives in an emergency too.  Especially when it's your Real American, God-fearin', bootstrappy community that stands to get wiped from the face of the Earth. It isn't the Democrats' fault God has the aim of a blind man with Parkinson's disease when it comes to a-smitin' them queers.

What's the worst-case, here? We shed ourselves of the jibbering lunatic demographic that's pathologically incapable of allowing us a sensible, sustainable, growing economy and halfway decent foreign relations. Whooptie-goddamn-doo.
 
2013-08-28 10:44:30 AM  

SVenus: give me doughnuts: I wonder how many towns in Texas are running out of water due to fracking?

Oil companies are willing to pay more for the water than the farmers. So, yeah, big issue in some areas.

In other news, the profit from the same amount of water used is higher with fracking than the same amount of water used in farming according to at least one Master's thesis I saw at a show.


And then we run out of clean water and can't grow as much food and fracking starts to look like a pretty short sighted solution.
 
2013-08-28 10:53:00 AM  
You never know.


i239.photobucket.com
 
2013-08-28 10:54:36 AM  
Obviously the answer is less government interference.  If the government weren't reporting these earth quakes then the fracking gas companies could exist in a free market where there were only private information and thrive and people wouldn't be complaining about earthquakes.
 
2013-08-28 11:10:55 AM  
The fracking is done at about 7500 ft. down.The wastewater injection wells are at about 10,000 ft. down which is the depth of the earthquakes.
 
2013-08-28 11:11:01 AM  

MechaPyx: And then we run out of clean water and can't grow as much food and fracking starts to look like a pretty short sighted solution.


If anything, we grow too much food already, and it's not the kind we really need the most. Besides, not only is a lot of Texas land not fit for farming, it's not much good for ranching either unless you've got fat subsidies, a ranch the size of Vermont, and cattle that can graze at 20mph because that's how fast they'll have to move to get to enough food in one day.
 
2013-08-28 11:15:18 AM  
Awesome headline, subby.

/living in the pron capital of the world, so getting a kick
 
2013-08-28 11:25:28 AM  
Fraking is clearly responsible for the loss of pirates and therefore Global Warming.
 
2013-08-28 11:28:14 AM  

MechaPyx: What about places like PA or ND? There are huge fracking operations going on there now...shouldn't they be experiencing EQs more frequently also?


Pay no attention to the scaffolding on the Washington Monument. They just had some budget money left over.


www1.pictures.zimbio.com
 
2013-08-28 11:34:25 AM  

MechaPyx: And then we run out of clean water and can't grow as much food and fracking starts to look like a pretty short sighted solution.


So is paying for water and fertilizer for corn to be grown to be used as fuel - and subsidized to boot.
 
2013-08-28 11:44:40 AM  
I'm having a *real* hard time giving a crap about a 4.0 earthquake. We didn't even *notice* them when I lived in So Cal.

I don't have an opinion one way or another on fracking, but if *this* is your big concern, get a pair.
 
2013-08-28 11:51:32 AM  
It baffles me that anyone other than a petroleum company would think there are any upsides at all to fracking.
 
2013-08-28 12:02:28 PM  
The version I was was that it was a feature, not a bug.

See, the relatively minor pressure releases stop one big pressure release.

\And the traveling STD's and polluted wells, not sure how to handle that.

\\And if natural gas is so great, where are the f**king cars that run on natural gas?
 
2013-08-28 12:03:11 PM  

DrKillPatient: You never know.


[216x317 from http://i239.photobucket.com/albums/ff294/DrKillPatient/crackintheworld _zps8d99c98b.jpg image 216x317]


Sounds like the makings of a great thriller starring Tara Reid!

Here.  I'll help with a graphic.  Here's where all the fracked Eagle Ford wells line up toward San Antonio

i.imgur.com
 
2013-08-28 12:11:50 PM  

Thank You Black Jesus!: It baffles me that anyone other than a petroleum company would think there are any upsides at all to fracking.


If I was completely exempt from having to adhere to the clean air and water acts, I could make truckloads of money, too.

The oil companies and drillers have turned the USA into China for environmental purposes.
 
2013-08-28 12:34:19 PM  
As a native Californian who has lived through several earthquakes, even one which red-tagged my home, and who's lived briefly in Texas, it's not the earthquakes I'd be worried about.  The minor faults present in Texas are not conducive to producing a large quake, and from all the data that's available, it would appear that man-made quakes rarely even approach a 5.0.

I would, however, be worried about all of the secret, not gonna tell you, chemicals these upstanding petroleum companies are pumping into the ground, which, you know, merge with the groundwater.  It's a good thing Texas has some fine regulations to protect people from.... oh, wait.
 
2013-08-28 12:38:57 PM  

HotIgneous Intruder: The oil companies and drillers have turned the USA into China for environmental purposes.


China!  Hell, look what they did to California!
i.imgur.com
 
2013-08-28 12:45:30 PM  

hammettman: As a native Californian who has lived through several earthquakes, even one which red-tagged my home, and who's lived briefly in Texas, it's not the earthquakes I'd be worried about.  The minor faults present in Texas are not conducive to producing a large quake, and from all the data that's available, it would appear that man-made quakes rarely even approach a 5.0.

I would, however, be worried about all of the secret, not gonna tell you, chemicals these upstanding petroleum companies are pumping into the ground, which, you know, merge with the groundwater.  It's a good thing Texas has some fine regulations to protect people from.... oh, wait.


Nah. The petroleum companies assure us that it's as pure as water....but there's no way in hell they are going to release what chemicals they are due to "trade secrets". Like water.

As far as EQs go, unlike California, I think an issue is that, and I may be wrong here, Texas probably doesn't have any "earthquake-proof codes" that buildings need to adhere to. (Whether that's due to historically not being an especially earthquake prone area, or "darn building codes hurt business" attitude, it doesn't matter)
 
2013-08-28 12:55:08 PM  
Prophet of Loss: "I'd like to share a revelation that I've had during my time here. It came to me when I tried to classify your species and I realized that you're not actually mammals. Every mammal on this planet instinctively develops a natural equilibrium with the surrounding environment but you humans do not. You move to an area and you multiply and multiply until every natural resource is consumed and the only way you can survive is to spread to another area. There is another organism on this planet that follows the same pattern. Do you know what it is? A virus. Human beings are a disease, a cancer of this planet. You're a plague."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invasive_species
 
2013-08-28 12:59:26 PM  

BitwiseShift: MechaPyx: What about places like PA or ND? There are huge fracking operations going on there now...shouldn't they be experiencing EQs more frequently also?

Pay no attention to the scaffolding on the Washington Monument. They just had some budget money left over.

[594x396 from http://www1.pictures.zimbio.com/gi/Scaffolding+Envelopes+Washington+Mo nument+PEJHXCkeQ__l.jpg image 594x396]


I would also assume that the risk of earthquakes is very much related to the geological characteristics of a given area.  It's reasonable to believe fracking could cause earthquakes in one area, but not in others.
 
2013-08-28 01:11:15 PM  
True story:  I control all access to the only USGS seismograph in Texas and one of the few in the midwest/Gulf region.

Buwuwhahaha, you all laughed at me, but NOW we have an article on Texas earthquakes and I control all of the most accurate data!  WHO'S LAUGHING NOW, YOU CRETINS?

//drunk on the small amount of power he's found himself
 
2013-08-28 01:25:52 PM  

Thank You Black Jesus!: It baffles me that anyone other than a petroleum company would think there are any upsides at all to fracking.


You mean other then all the jobs flowing into poor and destitute areas of the US, as well as all the mineral rights money that is bringing much needed help to small town america and farmers?

Would I like to see some regulation to protect groundwater?  Yes.  Would I like to see the government stand up for the rights of the landholders?  Yes.  But, also understand that this is a big opportunity for people who have been living in poverty for generations and the only thing they might have is land.  To dismiss this industry completely is foolish.
 
2013-08-28 02:18:46 PM  

snowshovel: but there's no way in hell they are going to release what chemicals they are due to "trade secrets".


They are now required to in many states, especially Texas. It's an easy database to navigate, and even with a helpful map display.  There's a several month delay in posting this info, but those interested in a particular well can get the info faster with a search of the state website involved.  In Texas, it's the RRC.
 
2013-08-28 03:56:31 PM  

SVenus: snowshovel: but there's no way in hell they are going to release what chemicals they are due to "trade secrets".

They are now required to in many states, especially Texas. It's an easy database to navigate, and even with a helpful map display.  There's a several month delay in posting this info, but those interested in a particular well can get the info faster with a search of the state website involved.  In Texas, it's the RRC.


Neat!  Thanks for that.
 
2013-08-28 04:52:04 PM  
Texas is a big place, I'm sure it can handle an earthquake or two from all the fracking. I for one, am waiting for the "big one" that's going to hit the southern california area sooner or later within this decade. I think we're to expect at least 5.0 magnitude on the Richter scale, but like all earthquakes it's not of matter of if but a matter of when and where it will happen.

As a side note, I think the Pron Valley today is more about the plethora of strip clubs that easily within reach. I can think of 4 or 5 from where I live that are within a 5 mile radius. I know there's a few porn HQ's around here, but I don't think that's where the shoots take place. I'm sure Florida would be IT place for that stuff these days. Whatever, the valley is boring place anyways, not much to do around here, lots of girls etc. etc., so people just fark themselves silly like any other collection of cities that have nothing else to do. And Hollywood is nearby, so might as well film it and you got yourself a movie.
 
2013-08-28 04:55:54 PM  
There's been repeated earthquakes in Youngstown, Ohio, due to the fracking going on around there.

It's like 3.2 earthquakes, which is so pathetic I never felt any of them when I was living there, but still... quite interesting.
 
2013-08-28 05:42:10 PM  
'Tis true.

/Valley dweller
 
2013-08-28 05:43:04 PM  
I live in Texas no one cares, not even the news. One hit in Grand Prairie and even the news was like wtf who cares. Of course, no one cares about Grand Prairie either so..
 
2013-08-28 07:13:29 PM  

snowshovel: Nah. The petroleum companies assure us that it's as pure as water....but there's no way in hell they are going to release what chemicals they are due to "trade secrets". Like water.


Thing is, what little groundwater there is in West Texas has been pretty well useless for consumption and agriculture without any help from man. It's not a hospitable spot for agriculture of any kind, let alone all but the sparsest human habitation, and  hasn't been since prehistoric times.
 
2013-08-28 07:22:14 PM  
But the dwarves delved too greedily and too deep.
 
2013-08-28 07:58:07 PM  

sno man: GoodHomer: Subby forgot to read the article:

However, researchers concluded the quakes were not related to hydraulic fracturing, the process of pumping water, sand and chemicals at high pressure to crack open dense shale rock.

But they also said the increased earthquakes were due to the increase in oil production.  Guess how that increase is happening.


If you get in a car accident, do you blame the gasoline you put in your car because you couldn't get anywhere without it?

Smart risk management involves identifying the potential problem, in this case, de-pressurization of the reservoir during long-term production. You wouldn't put regulations in place covering fracking in order to mitigate this risk, so why blame fracking?
 
2013-08-28 08:25:55 PM  

GoodHomer: sno man: GoodHomer: Subby forgot to read the article:

However, researchers concluded the quakes were not related to hydraulic fracturing, the process of pumping water, sand and chemicals at high pressure to crack open dense shale rock.

But they also said the increased earthquakes were due to the increase in oil production.  Guess how that increase is happening.

If you get in a car accident, do you blame the gasoline you put in your car because you couldn't get anywhere without it?

Smart risk management involves identifying the potential problem, in this case, de-pressurization of the reservoir during long-term production. You wouldn't put regulations in place covering fracking in order to mitigate this risk, so why blame fracking?


Wut? a closer analogy to what you are suggesting would be totally ignoring the BAC of the driver as a factor in the accident. & Wut, I have the power to regulate an industry in a foreign country??

They said the increased production was the problem.  They use fracking to increase production, but then say it's not the fracking. (let's just roll with that a sec...)
Other places have worked out that it's the injecting of the waste water from fracking causing the earthquakes...
So you are telling me this waste water injection is completely independent from, and has nothing to do with fracking either?
 
2013-08-28 08:44:55 PM  

Thank You Black Jesus!: It baffles me that anyone other than a petroleum company would think there are any upsides at all to fracking.


yu git free natral gas out yo faucit to!!! get a brain you MORAN!!!!1
 
2013-08-28 09:28:20 PM  

sno man: GoodHomer: sno man: GoodHomer: Subby forgot to read the article:

However, researchers concluded the quakes were not related to hydraulic fracturing, the process of pumping water, sand and chemicals at high pressure to crack open dense shale rock.

But they also said the increased earthquakes were due to the increase in oil production.  Guess how that increase is happening.

If you get in a car accident, do you blame the gasoline you put in your car because you couldn't get anywhere without it?

Smart risk management involves identifying the potential problem, in this case, de-pressurization of the reservoir during long-term production. You wouldn't put regulations in place covering fracking in order to mitigate this risk, so why blame fracking?

Wut? a closer analogy to what you are suggesting would be totally ignoring the BAC of the driver as a factor in the accident. & Wut, I have the power to regulate an industry in a foreign country??

They said the increased production was the problem.  They use fracking to increase production, but then say it's not the fracking. (let's just roll with that a sec...)
Other places have worked out that it's the injecting of the waste water from fracking causing the earthquakes...
So you are telling me this waste water injection is completely independent from, and has nothing to do with fracking either?


They are three different things, all part of the life-cycle of oil and gas operations, but operationally pretty different from each other.

You regulate things like fracking by putting in rules about maximum pressures used, minimum casing strength for wells where it's done, disclosure of the chemicals used, where and how you get your water for your fracking fluid, and how the water that flows back out of a well during clean up must be captured and disposed of. The pressures used during this stage are very different than the pressures used during wastewater injection, so you need a separate set of rules for them. Yet the waters recovered are going to be similar to the waters recovered during regular oil and gas production, so maybe similar rules for them are okay. You can even put in rules about monitoring for earthquake activity during hydraulic fracturing and what to do if you detect some (the British Columbia Oil and Gas Commission actually has rules about this).

You regulate subsequent production from wells by putting in rules about how often the well must be checked to see if the casing is still good, how produced fluids must be contained and disposed of, and what kind of standards will govern the pipelines it's produced into.

You regulate fluid disposal in injection wells by putting in rules about maximum pressures and volumes the well should be subjected to (these injection pressures are far below those used for fracking) and how often the well must be checked to see if the casing is still good. It's also becoming apparent rules need to be in place to detect related seismic activity and what the well operators should do if they detect one.

They're all related, but have significant differences. Putting in rules at the fracking stage isn't going to help when there are problems during the production stage nor during the disposal stage. Thus, when people blame fracking for all these problems, it really annoys me. They should either be more specific or refer to oil and gas operations in general.

I'm not much of a friend of industry either. It's becoming very apparent that the oil and gas industry in the U.S. is becoming its own worst enemy when it comes to earning their social licence to operate. If a new rule is introduced to cover some regulatory gap or cover a newly discovered problem, generally, the first instinct industry has is to fight it. Chesapeake, one of the bigger U.S. producers, is currently screwing over the Pennsylvania landowners it signed deals with by increasing the deductions off of royalty checks by far more than is standard. How they think this is going  to help them in the long run, I have no farking clue

Frankly, the industry in the U.S. has a rotten safety culture and, without a good safety culture, you can't trust them to do the right thing at any point in oil and gas operations.
 
2013-08-29 12:10:34 PM  
Haliburton wants to recycle the water from fracking
Here's a promotional video.  It's not to sell to the public, but future customers.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Win5Mr52Aa0
 
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