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(Washington Post)   Free at last? Just a dream for Americans who want MLK's most famous speech   ( washingtonpost.com) divider line
    More: Asinine, Martin Luther King, Americans, famous speeches, March on Washington  
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4478 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Aug 2013 at 8:51 AM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2013-08-28 09:12:21 AM  
7 votes:
The real tragedy is that rather than people not be judged by the color of their skin, the US has become hyper race sensitive instead, where everybody's words and actions can be parsed and viewed through the 'is this racist' prism.

Black people and white people are often afraid of talking politics or current events because so often they're painted as black vs white

It's all very sad really.
2013-08-28 08:55:03 AM  
5 votes:
And every time you pay, they chime out "Fee and last, fee at last, thank the almighty dollar I got my fee at last!"
2013-08-28 09:41:46 AM  
4 votes:

Mugato: Kang's families gots to get paid!


It's a bit more complicated then that.

King himself is the reason why they copyrighted the entire speech.  Maybe two months after it was given.  And do you know why?

Sony started putting the speech out on records.  And pocketing all the money.
2013-08-28 09:33:53 AM  
4 votes:

gonegirl: Meh.  Every so often, there's whiny outrage over MLK's family establishing their legal rights.  This right allows them to, for example, make sure that his likeness doesn't end up being used to sell Coca-Cola.  Or beer.  I think this is good.

And they want money for his words to be used.  You know what?  After decades of this country's commercial media completely farking over black citizens - where'd you get those songs from, Elvis? - I find it hard to care about one black man's family demanding to be paid for the things he created.


On the surface, I agree with this.  However, on the other hand, I think some things are just too important and belong to history.  I think this is one of those things.
2013-08-28 10:08:25 AM  
3 votes:

INeedAName: There is a massive chunk of the American population that is under represented politically, economically, and socially - but let's all pretend that has nothing to do with their race, and the social uphill battle they've been fighting for years.


I think it's more "racist" to assume for my black next door neighbor to be "represented politically", there needs to be more black leaders.

Part of the problem is people are put into voting blocks as if all of their issues are the same.  Black voters, hispanic voters, evangelical christians, etc.

The whole thing is idiotic.  My wife is 'hispanic", born and lived most of her life in S. America.  What does she have in common with a Mexican immigrant in LA or a Cuban Refugee in Miami, or a Puerto Rican in NY?  Nothing at all, other than they (kinda) originally spoke the same language.  BUT WHO IS LOOKING OUT FOR THE HISPANICS?!

My neighbor and I are in the exact same economic bracket, we both have kids, we probably have the same concerns in life locally and nationally.  Which of us is represented politically? Neither of us really, and not because of our "race"

All of this is the antithesis of the "dream speech", but MLK's biggest fans continue to push the country in a direction away from the actual dream.
2013-08-28 09:26:01 AM  
3 votes:
Just think of the Mega-Church MLK would have had by now.

/PTL
2013-08-28 09:21:43 AM  
3 votes:
I see we've got some people railing on his family for what's perceived as greed... not gonna touch that one. I was more weirded out that he himself was the one who essentially applied for the copyright, very shortly after delivering the speech. I'm not sure how to feel about that...
2013-08-28 09:12:03 AM  
3 votes:

nekom: Thanks, Obama.

Disney

/get it right
2013-08-28 09:06:05 AM  
3 votes:
"...that is the principal tenant upon which copyright laws were created."

Is there a "Bob the Angry Flower" for this one?
2013-08-28 10:23:11 AM  
2 votes:

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Martin Luther King Jr.'s family has the right to make money from his creative works the same way that Walt Disney's family continues to profit from his.


You're actually comparing the two? Sigh. Where to start,
2013-08-28 09:55:05 AM  
2 votes:

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: tetsoushima: [850x714 from http://o.onionstatic.com/images/5/5426/original/700.hq.jpg?2506 image 850x714]

And another racist....


I think someone needs to explain to you what racism is.
2013-08-28 09:48:25 AM  
2 votes:
Bah. What really pisses me off is those jerks who own the copyright to happy birthday. Protecting MLK's image from predatory marketing and using the funds to support a family is fine. Trying to make royalties off a hundred year old american kid's song is what's truly asinine.
2013-08-28 09:27:42 AM  
2 votes:

asynchron: I see we've got some people railing on his family for what's perceived as greed... not gonna touch that one. I was more weirded out that he himself was the one who essentially applied for the copyright, very shortly after delivering the speech. I'm not sure how to feel about that...


He was a pastor involved in the civil rights movement, and he had a family. It's not a lucrative field to go into, and he wanted to leverage his career as a civil rights leader to make sure that his family was provided for after his death. He knew that his life would most likely be cut tragically short, in fact, he mentioned it almost prophetically in his final speech. If you're a poor, black widow living during that time, it's going to be very, very rough on you, and he made sure that his family was supported by his work. I have nothing but respect for that decision.
2013-08-28 09:18:13 AM  
2 votes:
at least until it enters the public domain in 2038

The Mouse ain't gonna let that happen.
2013-08-28 09:09:37 AM  
2 votes:
Money was raised to build the statue of MLK on the National Monument and they were all ready to go, had raised enough money. Then here comes the family demanding their cut. The family had already been paid over $700,000 thousand since 2003 from the non profit forpermission to use MLK'simage and words. The family now wanted $800 thousand more or they would stop the project. I don't know if they ever got it. Maybe they did somehow and that is why they had to outsource the project to China.... :)
2013-08-28 09:01:04 AM  
2 votes:
You'd think that a speech made in a public forum would be public domain but strangely no. The people who recorded King speaking, I guess, violate the copyright.

Just waiting for Nancy Reagan to copyright all of Ron's speeches. Make the Repubs pay for Zombie Reagan's appearances.
2013-08-28 08:56:42 AM  
2 votes:
I guess it's best we just forget about the guy.
2013-08-28 08:10:36 AM  
2 votes:
Kang's families gots to get paid!
2013-08-28 12:22:38 PM  
1 vote:

Satanic_Hamster: ThatDarkFellow: [608x650 from http://cdn.stereogum.com/files/2012/10/Lil-Wayne1-608x650.jpg image 608x650]

King would be proud

[540x720 from http://i.imgur.com/KU4Lh0c.jpg image 540x720]

You're really proud of this, right...?


Lol good one, I mean you hardly EVER see a pregnant black woman anywhere...
2013-08-28 11:09:09 AM  
1 vote:

monoski: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Mugato: Just curious, how many other speeches have been copyrighted with families making money off of them? Honest question.

I heard an NPR interview with a Churchill biographer a while back. Apparently, he had to pay for every quote he used from one of Churchill's speeches, even though they were given as part of his public position.

That is different Churchill is white and according the posts in this thread black people getting paid for one of the most important speaches in the history of this country is some sort of travesty or rip off.



On top of this Churchill was a politician, so there is an argument that his speeches are more likely to be public domain.

But yeah, obviously this is about a black family "being all greedy and buying rims". God forbid that companies use his speech for free. Now, if King's family were saints they would collect the royalties and donate to charity but I don't think anyone in our society has a leg to stand on for that argument.  I can also argue that making a few bucks off of King's work is a pretty shiatty form of compensation for having your grandfather murdered for trying to spread equality.

I don't even particularly like my grandfather, and I wouldn't trade a large sum of money for his death.
2013-08-28 10:59:06 AM  
1 vote:
King may have been a good guy, but his family are scuzzbuckets.
2013-08-28 10:57:20 AM  
1 vote:

Mugato: Not according to every other source I've looked at.


How about this? It says right there in the facts of the case:

"On September 30, 1963, approximately one month after the delivery of the Speech, Dr. King took
steps to secure federal copyright protection for theSpeech under the Copyright Act of 1909, and a certificateof registration of his claim to copyright was issuedby the Copyright Office on October 2, 1963.  "

What are all these mysterious sources that you "researched" in your studious efforts to learn more about Dr. King?
2013-08-28 10:56:49 AM  
1 vote:

KimNorth: Money was raised to build the statue of MLK on the National Monument and they were all ready to go, had raised enough money. Then here comes the family demanding their cut. The family had already been paid over $700,000 thousand since 2003 from the non profit forpermission to use MLK'simage and words. The family now wanted $800 thousand more or they would stop the project. I don't know if they ever got it. Maybe they did somehow and that is why they had to outsource the project to China.... :)


This is so farking retard and wrong, I don't know where to start.
I'll go with, you can obviously count to potato.

i.imgur.com
2013-08-28 10:55:56 AM  
1 vote:
Take a look at this:

http://www.thekingcenter.org/archive/theme/730

I have a copy of the LP that resulted from this negotiation, and this was done when MLK was alive.  And yes, you can still get one.  I bought mine new, less than a decade ago.

http://www.amazon.com/Great-March-Washington-LP-VINYL/dp/B000WNOWEA
2013-08-28 10:51:28 AM  
1 vote:

MythDragon: Since 1963, King and, posthumously, his estate have strictly enforced control over use of that speech and King's likeness

[300x300 from http://images3.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20130731104740/epicrapbattlesofh istory/images/5/5d/Gandhi_vs_MLK.jpg image 300x300]

[720x480 from http://www.morethings.com/fan/boondocks/boondocks-mlk-2006-1690.jpg image 720x480]

"Will ya'll nubians PLEASE shut up?
Is this it?
Is this what I got all those ass-whoopin's for?
I had a dream once.
It was a dream that all the little black boys and little black girls would drink from the river of prosperity,
Freed from the thirst of oppression.
But low and behold, some four decades later,
What have I found but a but a bunch of trifling,
Shiftless, good-for-nothing nubians.
And I know some of you don't want to hear me say that word:
It's the ugliest word in the English language.
But that is what I see now: nubians.
And you don't want to be a nubian because nubians are living contradictions.
nubians are full of unfulfilled ambitions;
nubians wax and wane, nubians love to complain;
nubians love to hear themselves talk, but hate to explain.
nubians love being another man's judge and jury,
nubians procrastinate till it's time to worry.
nubians love to be late, nubians hate to hurry....
Black Entertainment Television is the worst thing i've seen in my life!
...Usher, Michael Jackson is not a genre of music!...
I've seen what's around the corner,
I've seen what's over the horizon, and I promise you,
You nubians have nothing to celebrate."


Is this some sort of pitch for Jello pudding?
2013-08-28 10:49:44 AM  
1 vote:

Witty Comment: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: I never said I was ignoring them. They go in gray 4, with a tag. Lots of people on fark tag posters to remind them who certain people are. And I've been contributing to the conversation, only to be told I'm full of "white guilt" for thinking that Martin Luther King Jr.'s family has the right to make money from his creative works the same way that Walt Disney's family continues to profit from his.

Are you chastising the idiot that said that? No. It's a huge double standard. It's okay to be racist, but the people who point out that other people are racist are the real problem. Because racists are such delicate little flowers or something.

No, I'm not. I'm chastising you. Why are you trying to deflect onto another person? Furthermore, why are you trying to give the impression that I'm saying it's okay to be racist? Even beyond that, where did you GET that impression? You need to EDUCATE people to change their minds, it's the only way. You're pointing fingers and screaming racist.

And I hope you recognize the irony of classifying people who you judge to be judgmental of another persons color of skin by designating them a color and marginalizing them.


I will put it to you bluntly, and simply - so that even a child can understand: The descendants of the enslavers don't get to tell the descendents of the enslaved when racism is "over".
As a white person, I am more than content with the privilege I have inherited in America, and I respect it's cost. I suggest you adopt the same philosophy. We got born on third base, dude - we didn't hit no triple. Act and react accordingly.
2013-08-28 10:49:34 AM  
1 vote:

Mugato: Just curious, how many other speeches have been copyrighted with families making money off of them? Honest question.


I heard an NPR interview with a Churchill biographer a while back. Apparently, he had to pay for every quote he used from one of Churchill's speeches, even though they were given as part of his public position.
2013-08-28 10:47:54 AM  
1 vote:

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: He knew that his life would most likely be cut tragically short, in fact, he mentioned it almost prophetically in his final speech. If you're a poor, black widow living during that time, it's going to be very, very rough on you, and he made sure that his family was supported by his work. I have nothing but respect for that decision.


It was copyrighted after his death.
2013-08-28 10:45:43 AM  
1 vote:

Lee Jackson Beauregard: at least until it enters the public domain in 2038

The Mouse ain't gonna let that happen.


Sadly, you're spot on.  Whenever Steamboat Willie comes up for copyright expiration, Disney starts paying off lawmakers for extensions.
2013-08-28 10:40:19 AM  
1 vote:

Frank N Stein: Frank N Stein: INeedAName: Frank N Stein: LBJ's war on poverty. Out of marriage births have been on the rise since the 60s.

Are you suggesting that welfare is to blame here? At the time LBJ gave that speech, the poverty rate was 19%, it currently sits at 16%.

And the poor access to contraceptives in a religiously conservative society has a lot to do with births. If the public school system was able to teach prevention and distribute condoms, I would wager much of that would be on the decline.

We weren't talking about poverty. We were talking about the crippling of the black family structure, as you put it.

And furthermore, the problem the modern black family structure is most rampant in urban areas, hardly "religiously conservative" societies.


Really? Because traditionally black Christian denominations tend to be some of the most conservative in the country. That's part of why the HIV/AIDS epidemic hit their community so heavily. No one was really able to talk about homosexuality or protected sex.
2013-08-28 10:37:22 AM  
1 vote:

Frank N Stein: INeedAName: Frank N Stein: LBJ's war on poverty. Out of marriage births have been on the rise since the 60s.

Are you suggesting that welfare is to blame here? At the time LBJ gave that speech, the poverty rate was 19%, it currently sits at 16%.

And the poor access to contraceptives in a religiously conservative society has a lot to do with births. If the public school system was able to teach prevention and distribute condoms, I would wager much of that would be on the decline.

We weren't talking about poverty. We were talking about the crippling of the black family structure, as you put it.


And you suggested the 'war on poverty' as a root cause. If you're going to suggest a cause, shouldn't we talk about it?
2013-08-28 10:32:28 AM  
1 vote:

Frank N Stein: LBJ's war on poverty. Out of marriage births have been on the rise since the 60s.


Are you suggesting that welfare is to blame here? At the time LBJ gave that speech, the poverty rate was 19%, it currently sits at 16%.

And the poor access to contraceptives in a religiously conservative society has a lot to do with births. If the public school system was able to teach prevention and distribute condoms, I would wager much of that would be on the decline.
2013-08-28 10:25:40 AM  
1 vote:

INeedAName: Frank N Stein: INeedAName: GBB: INeedAName: MugzyBrown: The real tragedy is that rather than people not be judged by the color of their skin, the US has become hyper race sensitive instead, where everybody's words and actions can be parsed and viewed through the 'is this racist' prism.

Black people and white people are often afraid of talking politics or current events because so often they're painted as black vs white

It's all very sad really.

Statements like this are most often made by people who have no understanding of the current racial situation in America and can't understand why people won't just 'let it go.' There is a massive chunk of the American population that is under represented politically, economically, and socially - but let's all pretend that has nothing to do with their race, and the social uphill battle they've been fighting for years.

People look for racism because, while it may not be rampant and overt in this country the way it was 50 years ago, it is still very much a part of some people's live. I'm sorry if that's hard for you to accept, but just because you don't experience, that's no reason to believe it doesn't exist.

Which is to Mugzy's point.  "there is a massive chunk of the American population that is under-represented politically, economically, and socially".  But, "Black people and white people are often afraid of talking politics or current events because so often they're painted as black vs white ", so they don't talk about it.  Which is how they become under-represented.

Right. Not talking about things is how they have become under represented. You either know very little about the current American environment for black people, the current financial/educational systems in America, or both.

When laws were passed to enact mandatory sentencing for crack cocaine (which more black people had access to) at a significantly larger rate that powdered cocaine (more of a white person's drug) than large portions of young black men ended up in priso ...

It's certainly a contributing factor. You'd like to offer insight on other factors, by all means go ahead.


LBJ's war on poverty. Out of marriage births have been on the rise since the 60s.
2013-08-28 10:23:31 AM  
1 vote:
Also, we don't need more black leaders for representation. We need more *human* leaders. If you're a black leader, again, you're just feeding the monster. The "black leaders" in our country are mostly shills bought off by big corporate money, just like the white leaders, Hispanic leaders, Asian leaders... the race issue in that respect serves as a distraction from the REAL problem at hand. The people buying off our politicians have no race, mostly because there is no checkbox on a standardized for for "evil scumsucker". Imagine: the black leaders of America unanimously decide they aren't fighting for the "black" race any longer, and decide they're fighting for the human race. What then? Would I no longer be considered racist for saying all of that? You know what happens when you're worried about your own race, and nothing but? History shows you pretty well with what has happened to Native Americans, Blacks, Hispanics, Jews, Asians.. you name it (except the whites, amirite?). When your only political motivation is "fighting for" your race and you're put in power en masse, things like Detroit happen.

Yeah, go ahead, call me racist for it. It's true, though.
2013-08-28 10:19:48 AM  
1 vote:

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: I never said I was ignoring them. They go in gray 4, with a tag. Lots of people on fark tag posters to remind them who certain people are. And I've been contributing to the conversation, only to be told I'm full of "white guilt" for thinking that Martin Luther King Jr.'s family has the right to make money from his creative works the same way that Walt Disney's family continues to profit from his.

Are you chastising the idiot that said that? No. It's a huge double standard. It's okay to be racist, but the people who point out that other people are racist are the real problem. Because racists are such delicate little flowers or something.


Are you talking about the 20 inch rims comment? It was a joke, man. And not even a hurtful one. Get over yourself.
2013-08-28 10:08:30 AM  
1 vote:
Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich


Isn't publicly declaring a poster of a (subjectively funny) picture racist, and then publicly declaring you're going to ignore said poster, only feeding the monster? How about instead of public declarations so as to appear to be a morally upright and outstanding netizen and therefore disqualify yourself from EVER FOREVER being dubbed a racist, you just DO IT and then make a positive contribution to the thread and STFU about who you're ignoring? You're not doing anything to educate anyone, or make a positive impression. In fact, you're only serving to further marginalize others and drive a wedge in the rift that's already there. You could do something like, I dunno, say "Hey, you ePoster, I didn't find that very funny. This is why." and then explain yourself in a thoughtful manner. Finger pointing at someone and screaming racist, then quickly ignoring them really makes you look like an immature, uneducated, willfully ignorant asshat.

Love,

The rest of us.
2013-08-28 09:58:09 AM  
1 vote:

GBB: INeedAName: MugzyBrown: The real tragedy is that rather than people not be judged by the color of their skin, the US has become hyper race sensitive instead, where everybody's words and actions can be parsed and viewed through the 'is this racist' prism.

Black people and white people are often afraid of talking politics or current events because so often they're painted as black vs white

It's all very sad really.

Statements like this are most often made by people who have no understanding of the current racial situation in America and can't understand why people won't just 'let it go.' There is a massive chunk of the American population that is under represented politically, economically, and socially - but let's all pretend that has nothing to do with their race, and the social uphill battle they've been fighting for years.

People look for racism because, while it may not be rampant and overt in this country the way it was 50 years ago, it is still very much a part of some people's live. I'm sorry if that's hard for you to accept, but just because you don't experience, that's no reason to believe it doesn't exist.

Which is to Mugzy's point.  "there is a massive chunk of the American population that is under-represented politically, economically, and socially".  But, "Black people and white people are often afraid of talking politics or current events because so often they're painted as black vs white ", so they don't talk about it.  Which is how they become under-represented.


Right. Not talking about things is how they have become under represented. You either know very little about the current American environment for black people, the current financial/educational systems in America, or both.

When laws were passed to enact mandatory sentencing for crack cocaine (which more black people had access to) at a significantly larger rate that powdered cocaine (more of a white person's drug) than large portions of young black men ended up in prison for statistically overwhelming lengths of time, and at unheard of rates.

This lead to a crippling of the black family structure (which was once extremely strong, as noted by the number of black youths being raised by grandparents) and a weakening of the community. Tie that in to that fact that convicts are almost entirely unhirable and you end up with disenfranchised young men, with no legal means to make money. Thus the gang structure in America took off and suddenly crime becomes rampant and the leading cause of death among black men ages 16-25 is gun violence.

The reciprocating effect pushes more men out of the house at earlier ages. The lower income rates lead to poorer public schools, which leads to lower educational levels, and worse job opportunities. America basically systematized racial poverty.
2013-08-28 09:52:15 AM  
1 vote:

Mugato: Kang's families gots to get paid!


Don't blame me, I voted for Kodos.
GBB
2013-08-28 09:48:22 AM  
1 vote:

INeedAName: MugzyBrown: The real tragedy is that rather than people not be judged by the color of their skin, the US has become hyper race sensitive instead, where everybody's words and actions can be parsed and viewed through the 'is this racist' prism.

Black people and white people are often afraid of talking politics or current events because so often they're painted as black vs white

It's all very sad really.

Statements like this are most often made by people who have no understanding of the current racial situation in America and can't understand why people won't just 'let it go.' There is a massive chunk of the American population that is under represented politically, economically, and socially - but let's all pretend that has nothing to do with their race, and the social uphill battle they've been fighting for years.

People look for racism because, while it may not be rampant and overt in this country the way it was 50 years ago, it is still very much a part of some people's live. I'm sorry if that's hard for you to accept, but just because you don't experience, that's no reason to believe it doesn't exist.


Which is to Mugzy's point.  "there is a massive chunk of the American population that is under-represented politically, economically, and socially".  But, "Black people and white people are often afraid of talking politics or current events because so often they're painted as black vs white ", so they don't talk about it.  Which is how they become under-represented.
2013-08-28 09:43:41 AM  
1 vote:

MugzyBrown: The real tragedy is that rather than people not be judged by the color of their skin, the US has become hyper race sensitive instead, where everybody's words and actions can be parsed and viewed through the 'is this racist' prism.

Black people and white people are often afraid of talking politics or current events because so often they're painted as black vs white

It's all very sad really.


Statements like this are most often made by people who have no understanding of the current racial situation in America and can't understand why people won't just 'let it go.' There is a massive chunk of the American population that is under represented politically, economically, and socially - but let's all pretend that has nothing to do with their race, and the social uphill battle they've been fighting for years.

People look for racism because, while it may not be rampant and overt in this country the way it was 50 years ago, it is still very much a part of some people's live. I'm sorry if that's hard for you to accept, but just because you don't experience, that's no reason to believe it doesn't exist.
2013-08-28 09:27:44 AM  
1 vote:
Meh.  Every so often, there's whiny outrage over MLK's family establishing their legal rights.  This right allows them to, for example, make sure that his likeness doesn't end up being used to sell Coca-Cola.  Or beer.  I think this is good.

And they want money for his words to be used.  You know what?  After decades of this country's commercial media completely farking over black citizens - where'd you get those songs from, Elvis? - I find it hard to care about one black man's family demanding to be paid for the things he created.
2013-08-28 09:16:37 AM  
1 vote:
o.onionstatic.com
2013-08-28 09:12:42 AM  
1 vote:

DrSansabeltNoShiatSlacks: Hey, 20" rims ain't cheap!


This will be a good thread to add to my list of racists.

/you're not funny and it isn't ironic
//just sad
2013-08-28 09:11:55 AM  
1 vote:

offacue: Do they get a royalty check for every boulevard named after him?


Yes, they got paid for ever time a street or whatever was named after him. Those were paid to them with our tax dollars.
2013-08-28 09:08:25 AM  
1 vote:
Protip: Don't take the subway to the memorial in Atlanta if you're white. Just.....don't.
2013-08-28 08:59:01 AM  
1 vote:
Hey, 20" rims ain't cheap!
2013-08-28 08:57:34 AM  
1 vote:
Here  it is on Youtube.
 
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