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(Washington Post)   Free at last? Just a dream for Americans who want MLK's most famous speech   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 162
    More: Asinine, Martin Luther King, Americans, famous speeches, March on Washington  
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4464 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Aug 2013 at 8:51 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-28 09:55:48 AM  
Ha! Proof that MLK wasn't a communist. Suck it, J. Edgar Hoover!!
 
2013-08-28 09:58:09 AM  

GBB: INeedAName: MugzyBrown: The real tragedy is that rather than people not be judged by the color of their skin, the US has become hyper race sensitive instead, where everybody's words and actions can be parsed and viewed through the 'is this racist' prism.

Black people and white people are often afraid of talking politics or current events because so often they're painted as black vs white

It's all very sad really.

Statements like this are most often made by people who have no understanding of the current racial situation in America and can't understand why people won't just 'let it go.' There is a massive chunk of the American population that is under represented politically, economically, and socially - but let's all pretend that has nothing to do with their race, and the social uphill battle they've been fighting for years.

People look for racism because, while it may not be rampant and overt in this country the way it was 50 years ago, it is still very much a part of some people's live. I'm sorry if that's hard for you to accept, but just because you don't experience, that's no reason to believe it doesn't exist.

Which is to Mugzy's point.  "there is a massive chunk of the American population that is under-represented politically, economically, and socially".  But, "Black people and white people are often afraid of talking politics or current events because so often they're painted as black vs white ", so they don't talk about it.  Which is how they become under-represented.


Right. Not talking about things is how they have become under represented. You either know very little about the current American environment for black people, the current financial/educational systems in America, or both.

When laws were passed to enact mandatory sentencing for crack cocaine (which more black people had access to) at a significantly larger rate that powdered cocaine (more of a white person's drug) than large portions of young black men ended up in prison for statistically overwhelming lengths of time, and at unheard of rates.

This lead to a crippling of the black family structure (which was once extremely strong, as noted by the number of black youths being raised by grandparents) and a weakening of the community. Tie that in to that fact that convicts are almost entirely unhirable and you end up with disenfranchised young men, with no legal means to make money. Thus the gang structure in America took off and suddenly crime becomes rampant and the leading cause of death among black men ages 16-25 is gun violence.

The reciprocating effect pushes more men out of the house at earlier ages. The lower income rates lead to poorer public schools, which leads to lower educational levels, and worse job opportunities. America basically systematized racial poverty.
 
2013-08-28 09:59:30 AM  

GBB: AdrienVeidt: Why do I keep getting 'Four Oh Three' when trying to put rotten cocksuckers on my ignore list today?

cause you can't ignore yourself?


Hey! I'll have you know I'm in no way rotten at it.
 
2013-08-28 10:00:10 AM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: tetsoushima: [850x714 from http://o.onionstatic.com/images/5/5426/original/700.hq.jpg?2506 image 850x714]

And another racist....


blog.lib.umn.edu
 
2013-08-28 10:02:10 AM  

WhoopAssWayne: Protip: Don't take the subway to the memorial in Atlanta if you're white. Just.....don't.


I take MARTA all the time since they ruled it's OK to carry on their trains.
 
2013-08-28 10:02:48 AM  
Article Title: "Why you won't see or hear the 'I have a dream' speech"

From the article: "Individuals visiting the King Center can buy a recording of the 'I have a dream' speech for $20."
 
2013-08-28 10:06:35 AM  
I guess no one has a problem with King or his estate doing this in the first place...
 
2013-08-28 10:06:55 AM  

KidneyStone: I take MARTA all the time since they ruled it's OK to carry on their trains.


I haven't been down there in several years. Did the new ruling make people on the trains a bit more polite? The other thing is the walk from the station to the memorial. Ugh.
 
2013-08-28 10:08:25 AM  

INeedAName: There is a massive chunk of the American population that is under represented politically, economically, and socially - but let's all pretend that has nothing to do with their race, and the social uphill battle they've been fighting for years.


I think it's more "racist" to assume for my black next door neighbor to be "represented politically", there needs to be more black leaders.

Part of the problem is people are put into voting blocks as if all of their issues are the same.  Black voters, hispanic voters, evangelical christians, etc.

The whole thing is idiotic.  My wife is 'hispanic", born and lived most of her life in S. America.  What does she have in common with a Mexican immigrant in LA or a Cuban Refugee in Miami, or a Puerto Rican in NY?  Nothing at all, other than they (kinda) originally spoke the same language.  BUT WHO IS LOOKING OUT FOR THE HISPANICS?!

My neighbor and I are in the exact same economic bracket, we both have kids, we probably have the same concerns in life locally and nationally.  Which of us is represented politically? Neither of us really, and not because of our "race"

All of this is the antithesis of the "dream speech", but MLK's biggest fans continue to push the country in a direction away from the actual dream.
 
2013-08-28 10:08:30 AM  
Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich


Isn't publicly declaring a poster of a (subjectively funny) picture racist, and then publicly declaring you're going to ignore said poster, only feeding the monster? How about instead of public declarations so as to appear to be a morally upright and outstanding netizen and therefore disqualify yourself from EVER FOREVER being dubbed a racist, you just DO IT and then make a positive contribution to the thread and STFU about who you're ignoring? You're not doing anything to educate anyone, or make a positive impression. In fact, you're only serving to further marginalize others and drive a wedge in the rift that's already there. You could do something like, I dunno, say "Hey, you ePoster, I didn't find that very funny. This is why." and then explain yourself in a thoughtful manner. Finger pointing at someone and screaming racist, then quickly ignoring them really makes you look like an immature, uneducated, willfully ignorant asshat.

Love,

The rest of us.
 
2013-08-28 10:12:46 AM  

HindiDiscoMonster: gonegirl: Meh.  Every so often, there's whiny outrage over MLK's family establishing their legal rights.  This right allows them to, for example, make sure that his likeness doesn't end up being used to sell Coca-Cola.  Or beer.  I think this is good.

And they want money for his words to be used.  You know what?  After decades of this country's commercial media completely farking over black citizens - where'd you get those songs from, Elvis? - I find it hard to care about one black man's family demanding to be paid for the things he created.

in a public forum... copyrighted after the event.


2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-08-28 10:13:16 AM  
Might as well get this over with, surprised it hasn't showed up yet
 
2013-08-28 10:14:17 AM  
i575.photobucket.com
 
2013-08-28 10:14:36 AM  
I never said I was ignoring them. They go in gray 4, with a tag. Lots of people on fark tag posters to remind them who certain people are. And I've been contributing to the conversation, only to be told I'm full of "white guilt" for thinking that Martin Luther King Jr.'s family has the right to make money from his creative works the same way that Walt Disney's family continues to profit from his.

Are you chastising the idiot that said that? No. It's a huge double standard. It's okay to be racist, but the people who point out that other people are racist are the real problem. Because racists are such delicate little flowers or something.
 
2013-08-28 10:17:28 AM  

INeedAName: GBB: INeedAName: MugzyBrown: The real tragedy is that rather than people not be judged by the color of their skin, the US has become hyper race sensitive instead, where everybody's words and actions can be parsed and viewed through the 'is this racist' prism.

Black people and white people are often afraid of talking politics or current events because so often they're painted as black vs white

It's all very sad really.

Statements like this are most often made by people who have no understanding of the current racial situation in America and can't understand why people won't just 'let it go.' There is a massive chunk of the American population that is under represented politically, economically, and socially - but let's all pretend that has nothing to do with their race, and the social uphill battle they've been fighting for years.

People look for racism because, while it may not be rampant and overt in this country the way it was 50 years ago, it is still very much a part of some people's live. I'm sorry if that's hard for you to accept, but just because you don't experience, that's no reason to believe it doesn't exist.

Which is to Mugzy's point.  "there is a massive chunk of the American population that is under-represented politically, economically, and socially".  But, "Black people and white people are often afraid of talking politics or current events because so often they're painted as black vs white ", so they don't talk about it.  Which is how they become under-represented.

Right. Not talking about things is how they have become under represented. You either know very little about the current American environment for black people, the current financial/educational systems in America, or both.

When laws were passed to enact mandatory sentencing for crack cocaine (which more black people had access to) at a significantly larger rate that powdered cocaine (more of a white person's drug) than large portions of young black men ended up in prison for statistically overwhelming lengths of time, and at unheard of rates.

This lead to a crippling of the black family structure (which was once extremely strong, as noted by the number of black youths being raised by grandparents) and a weakening of the community. Tie that in to that fact that convicts are almost entirely unhirable and you end up with disenfranchised young men, with no legal means to make money. Thus the gang structure in America took off and suddenly crime becomes rampant and the leading cause of death among black men ages 16-25 is gun violence.

The reciprocating effect pushes more men out of the house at earlier ages. The lower income rates lead to poorer public schools, which leads to lower educational levels, and worse job opportunities. America basically systematized racial poverty.


You're absolutely out of your mind if you think the destruction of black families is due to crack sentancing.
 
2013-08-28 10:18:08 AM  

MugzyBrown: INeedAName: There is a massive chunk of the American population that is under represented politically, economically, and socially - but let's all pretend that has nothing to do with their race, and the social uphill battle they've been fighting for years.

I think it's more "racist" to assume for my black next door neighbor to be "represented politically", there needs to be more black leaders.

Part of the problem is people are put into voting blocks as if all of their issues are the same.  Black voters, hispanic voters, evangelical christians, etc.

The whole thing is idiotic.  My wife is 'hispanic", born and lived most of her life in S. America.  What does she have in common with a Mexican immigrant in LA or a Cuban Refugee in Miami, or a Puerto Rican in NY?  Nothing at all, other than they (kinda) originally spoke the same language.  BUT WHO IS LOOKING OUT FOR THE HISPANICS?!

My neighbor and I are in the exact same economic bracket, we both have kids, we probably have the same concerns in life locally and nationally.  Which of us is represented politically? Neither of us really, and not because of our "race"

All of this is the antithesis of the "dream speech", but MLK's biggest fans continue to push the country in a direction away from the actual dream.


Dang. Thank you for pointing out to me that I actually made that statement.
 
2013-08-28 10:19:28 AM  

Frank N Stein: INeedAName: GBB: INeedAName: MugzyBrown: The real tragedy is that rather than people not be judged by the color of their skin, the US has become hyper race sensitive instead, where everybody's words and actions can be parsed and viewed through the 'is this racist' prism.

Black people and white people are often afraid of talking politics or current events because so often they're painted as black vs white

It's all very sad really.

Statements like this are most often made by people who have no understanding of the current racial situation in America and can't understand why people won't just 'let it go.' There is a massive chunk of the American population that is under represented politically, economically, and socially - but let's all pretend that has nothing to do with their race, and the social uphill battle they've been fighting for years.

People look for racism because, while it may not be rampant and overt in this country the way it was 50 years ago, it is still very much a part of some people's live. I'm sorry if that's hard for you to accept, but just because you don't experience, that's no reason to believe it doesn't exist.

Which is to Mugzy's point.  "there is a massive chunk of the American population that is under-represented politically, economically, and socially".  But, "Black people and white people are often afraid of talking politics or current events because so often they're painted as black vs white ", so they don't talk about it.  Which is how they become under-represented.

Right. Not talking about things is how they have become under represented. You either know very little about the current American environment for black people, the current financial/educational systems in America, or both.

When laws were passed to enact mandatory sentencing for crack cocaine (which more black people had access to) at a significantly larger rate that powdered cocaine (more of a white person's drug) than large portions of young black men ended up in priso ...


It's certainly a contributing factor. You'd like to offer insight on other factors, by all means go ahead.
 
2013-08-28 10:19:48 AM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: I never said I was ignoring them. They go in gray 4, with a tag. Lots of people on fark tag posters to remind them who certain people are. And I've been contributing to the conversation, only to be told I'm full of "white guilt" for thinking that Martin Luther King Jr.'s family has the right to make money from his creative works the same way that Walt Disney's family continues to profit from his.

Are you chastising the idiot that said that? No. It's a huge double standard. It's okay to be racist, but the people who point out that other people are racist are the real problem. Because racists are such delicate little flowers or something.


Are you talking about the 20 inch rims comment? It was a joke, man. And not even a hurtful one. Get over yourself.
 
2013-08-28 10:20:54 AM  

GBB: [662x516 from http://www.jonco48.com/blog/deram.jpg image 662x516]


Obvious photoshop is obvious.
 
2013-08-28 10:23:11 AM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Martin Luther King Jr.'s family has the right to make money from his creative works the same way that Walt Disney's family continues to profit from his.


You're actually comparing the two? Sigh. Where to start,
 
2013-08-28 10:23:31 AM  
Also, we don't need more black leaders for representation. We need more *human* leaders. If you're a black leader, again, you're just feeding the monster. The "black leaders" in our country are mostly shills bought off by big corporate money, just like the white leaders, Hispanic leaders, Asian leaders... the race issue in that respect serves as a distraction from the REAL problem at hand. The people buying off our politicians have no race, mostly because there is no checkbox on a standardized for for "evil scumsucker". Imagine: the black leaders of America unanimously decide they aren't fighting for the "black" race any longer, and decide they're fighting for the human race. What then? Would I no longer be considered racist for saying all of that? You know what happens when you're worried about your own race, and nothing but? History shows you pretty well with what has happened to Native Americans, Blacks, Hispanics, Jews, Asians.. you name it (except the whites, amirite?). When your only political motivation is "fighting for" your race and you're put in power en masse, things like Detroit happen.

Yeah, go ahead, call me racist for it. It's true, though.
 
2013-08-28 10:23:39 AM  

phrawgh: nekom: Thanks, Obama.

I blame and/or credit Obama and/or Bush!

/and possibly Clinton, Ford and LBJ
//Nixon don't get a pass either


It's all the fault of those people whose politics we disagree with, or whose ethnicity or religion are objectionable.
 
2013-08-28 10:25:24 AM  
 
2013-08-28 10:25:40 AM  

INeedAName: Frank N Stein: INeedAName: GBB: INeedAName: MugzyBrown: The real tragedy is that rather than people not be judged by the color of their skin, the US has become hyper race sensitive instead, where everybody's words and actions can be parsed and viewed through the 'is this racist' prism.

Black people and white people are often afraid of talking politics or current events because so often they're painted as black vs white

It's all very sad really.

Statements like this are most often made by people who have no understanding of the current racial situation in America and can't understand why people won't just 'let it go.' There is a massive chunk of the American population that is under represented politically, economically, and socially - but let's all pretend that has nothing to do with their race, and the social uphill battle they've been fighting for years.

People look for racism because, while it may not be rampant and overt in this country the way it was 50 years ago, it is still very much a part of some people's live. I'm sorry if that's hard for you to accept, but just because you don't experience, that's no reason to believe it doesn't exist.

Which is to Mugzy's point.  "there is a massive chunk of the American population that is under-represented politically, economically, and socially".  But, "Black people and white people are often afraid of talking politics or current events because so often they're painted as black vs white ", so they don't talk about it.  Which is how they become under-represented.

Right. Not talking about things is how they have become under represented. You either know very little about the current American environment for black people, the current financial/educational systems in America, or both.

When laws were passed to enact mandatory sentencing for crack cocaine (which more black people had access to) at a significantly larger rate that powdered cocaine (more of a white person's drug) than large portions of young black men ended up in priso ...

It's certainly a contributing factor. You'd like to offer insight on other factors, by all means go ahead.


LBJ's war on poverty. Out of marriage births have been on the rise since the 60s.
 
2013-08-28 10:28:04 AM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: I never said I was ignoring them. They go in gray 4, with a tag. Lots of people on fark tag posters to remind them who certain people are. And I've been contributing to the conversation, only to be told I'm full of "white guilt" for thinking that Martin Luther King Jr.'s family has the right to make money from his creative works the same way that Walt Disney's family continues to profit from his.

Are you chastising the idiot that said that? No. It's a huge double standard. It's okay to be racist, but the people who point out that other people are racist are the real problem. Because racists are such delicate little flowers or something.


No, I'm not. I'm chastising you. Why are you trying to deflect onto another person? Furthermore, why are you trying to give the impression that I'm saying it's okay to be racist? Even beyond that, where did you GET that impression? You need to EDUCATE people to change their minds, it's the only way. You're pointing fingers and screaming racist.

And I hope you recognize the irony of classifying people who you judge to be judgmental of another persons color of skin by designating them a color and marginalizing them.
 
2013-08-28 10:28:04 AM  

Witty Comment: Also, we don't need more black leaders for representation. We need more *human* leaders.


They're not "human"? Now that's old-school!
 
2013-08-28 10:31:35 AM  
"You people are crazy, racism isn't a thing anymore and actually you are racist for saying that racism is still a problem. - proceeds to say some racist shiat"

/very common type of post
 
2013-08-28 10:32:28 AM  

Frank N Stein: LBJ's war on poverty. Out of marriage births have been on the rise since the 60s.


Are you suggesting that welfare is to blame here? At the time LBJ gave that speech, the poverty rate was 19%, it currently sits at 16%.

And the poor access to contraceptives in a religiously conservative society has a lot to do with births. If the public school system was able to teach prevention and distribute condoms, I would wager much of that would be on the decline.
 
2013-08-28 10:33:57 AM  

HindiDiscoMonster: gonegirl: Meh.  Every so often, there's whiny outrage over MLK's family establishing their legal rights.  This right allows them to, for example, make sure that his likeness doesn't end up being used to sell Coca-Cola.  Or beer.  I think this is good.

And they want money for his words to be used.  You know what?  After decades of this country's commercial media completely farking over black citizens - where'd you get those songs from, Elvis? - I find it hard to care about one black man's family demanding to be paid for the things he created.

in a public forum... copyrighted after the event.


Which is completely irrelevant to copyright law, but let's not allow stupid things like "the law" get in the way of a political agenda.
 
2013-08-28 10:34:49 AM  

INeedAName: Frank N Stein: LBJ's war on poverty. Out of marriage births have been on the rise since the 60s.

Are you suggesting that welfare is to blame here? At the time LBJ gave that speech, the poverty rate was 19%, it currently sits at 16%.

And the poor access to contraceptives in a religiously conservative society has a lot to do with births. If the public school system was able to teach prevention and distribute condoms, I would wager much of that would be on the decline.


We weren't talking about poverty. We were talking about the crippling of the black family structure, as you put it.
 
2013-08-28 10:37:22 AM  

Frank N Stein: INeedAName: Frank N Stein: LBJ's war on poverty. Out of marriage births have been on the rise since the 60s.

Are you suggesting that welfare is to blame here? At the time LBJ gave that speech, the poverty rate was 19%, it currently sits at 16%.

And the poor access to contraceptives in a religiously conservative society has a lot to do with births. If the public school system was able to teach prevention and distribute condoms, I would wager much of that would be on the decline.

We weren't talking about poverty. We were talking about the crippling of the black family structure, as you put it.


And you suggested the 'war on poverty' as a root cause. If you're going to suggest a cause, shouldn't we talk about it?
 
2013-08-28 10:37:56 AM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: I never said I was ignoring them. They go in gray 4, with a tag. Lots of people on fark tag posters to remind them who certain people are. And I've been contributing to the conversation, only to be told I'm full of "white guilt" for thinking that Martin Luther King Jr.'s family has the right to make money from his creative works the same way that Walt Disney's family continues to profit from his.

Are you chastising the idiot that said that? No. It's a huge double standard. It's okay to be racist, but the people who point out that other people are racist are the real problem. Because racists are such delicate little flowers or something.



How dare they make money from that piece of intellectual property!  It should be public domain so that media companies can use it to make money instead!
BRB, I'm going to go chastise some people about how immoral they are for pirating an MP3 because I worship corporations for some reason and despise civil right's leaders.
 
2013-08-28 10:38:44 AM  

Frank N Stein: INeedAName: Frank N Stein: LBJ's war on poverty. Out of marriage births have been on the rise since the 60s.

Are you suggesting that welfare is to blame here? At the time LBJ gave that speech, the poverty rate was 19%, it currently sits at 16%.

And the poor access to contraceptives in a religiously conservative society has a lot to do with births. If the public school system was able to teach prevention and distribute condoms, I would wager much of that would be on the decline.

We weren't talking about poverty. We were talking about the crippling of the black family structure, as you put it.


And furthermore, the problem the modern black family structure is most rampant in urban areas, hardly "religiously conservative" societies.
 
2013-08-28 10:40:19 AM  

Frank N Stein: Frank N Stein: INeedAName: Frank N Stein: LBJ's war on poverty. Out of marriage births have been on the rise since the 60s.

Are you suggesting that welfare is to blame here? At the time LBJ gave that speech, the poverty rate was 19%, it currently sits at 16%.

And the poor access to contraceptives in a religiously conservative society has a lot to do with births. If the public school system was able to teach prevention and distribute condoms, I would wager much of that would be on the decline.

We weren't talking about poverty. We were talking about the crippling of the black family structure, as you put it.

And furthermore, the problem the modern black family structure is most rampant in urban areas, hardly "religiously conservative" societies.


Really? Because traditionally black Christian denominations tend to be some of the most conservative in the country. That's part of why the HIV/AIDS epidemic hit their community so heavily. No one was really able to talk about homosexuality or protected sex.
 
2013-08-28 10:41:43 AM  

INeedAName: Frank N Stein: INeedAName: Frank N Stein: LBJ's war on poverty. Out of marriage births have been on the rise since the 60s.

Are you suggesting that welfare is to blame here? At the time LBJ gave that speech, the poverty rate was 19%, it currently sits at 16%.

And the poor access to contraceptives in a religiously conservative society has a lot to do with births. If the public school system was able to teach prevention and distribute condoms, I would wager much of that would be on the decline.

We weren't talking about poverty. We were talking about the crippling of the black family structure, as you put it.

And you suggested the 'war on poverty' as a root cause. If you're going to suggest a cause, shouldn't we talk about it?


Sure, we can talk about it. Ask away. But first I'd like you to admit that your theory is total bullocks on the grounds that the trouble with black family structure clearly began decades earlier than what you claimed "led" to its "shattering"
 
2013-08-28 10:42:18 AM  
Just curious, how many other speeches have been copyrighted with families making money off of them? Honest question.
 
2013-08-28 10:43:52 AM  

WhoopAssWayne: Protip: Don't take the subway to the memorial in Atlanta if you're white. Just.....don't.


I did that about five years ago, and I'm white as snow.  No problems.  Has it gotten worse?

/concerned
 
2013-08-28 10:44:23 AM  

INeedAName: Frank N Stein: Frank N Stein: INeedAName: Frank N Stein: LBJ's war on poverty. Out of marriage births have been on the rise since the 60s.

Are you suggesting that welfare is to blame here? At the time LBJ gave that speech, the poverty rate was 19%, it currently sits at 16%.

And the poor access to contraceptives in a religiously conservative society has a lot to do with births. If the public school system was able to teach prevention and distribute condoms, I would wager much of that would be on the decline.

We weren't talking about poverty. We were talking about the crippling of the black family structure, as you put it.

And furthermore, the problem the modern black family structure is most rampant in urban areas, hardly "religiously conservative" societies.

Really? Because traditionally black Christian denominations tend to be some of the most conservative in the country. That's part of why the HIV/AIDS epidemic hit their community so heavily. No one was really able to talk about homosexuality or protected sex.


Is that so? Well, I suppose that's why blacks vote overwhelmingly for the most conservative candidate in national elections.
 
2013-08-28 10:44:52 AM  

Frank N Stein: INeedAName: Frank N Stein: INeedAName: Frank N Stein: LBJ's war on poverty. Out of marriage births have been on the rise since the 60s.

Are you suggesting that welfare is to blame here? At the time LBJ gave that speech, the poverty rate was 19%, it currently sits at 16%.

And the poor access to contraceptives in a religiously conservative society has a lot to do with births. If the public school system was able to teach prevention and distribute condoms, I would wager much of that would be on the decline.

We weren't talking about poverty. We were talking about the crippling of the black family structure, as you put it.

And you suggested the 'war on poverty' as a root cause. If you're going to suggest a cause, shouldn't we talk about it?

Sure, we can talk about it. Ask away. But first I'd like you to admit that your theory is total bullocks on the grounds that the trouble with black family structure clearly began decades earlier than what you claimed "led" to its "shattering."


I find it interesting that you have offered nothing in the way of actual discussion of the issue. You've thrown out two phrases and then told me I was wrong. Especially as I didn't claim mandatory sentencing was the only cause of deterioration amongst the black family structure, but it's cool.
 
2013-08-28 10:45:38 AM  
Since 1963, King and, posthumously, his estate have strictly enforced control over use of that speech and King's likeness

images3.wikia.nocookie.net

www.morethings.com

"Will ya'll nubians PLEASE shut up?
Is this it?
Is this what I got all those ass-whoopin's for?
I had a dream once.
It was a dream that all the little black boys and little black girls would drink from the river of prosperity,
Freed from the thirst of oppression.
But low and behold, some four decades later,
What have I found but a but a bunch of trifling,
Shiftless, good-for-nothing nubians.
And I know some of you don't want to hear me say that word:
It's the ugliest word in the English language.
But that is what I see now: nubians.
And you don't want to be a nubian because nubians are living contradictions.
nubians are full of unfulfilled ambitions;
nubians wax and wane, nubians love to complain;
nubians love to hear themselves talk, but hate to explain.
nubians love being another man's judge and jury,
nubians procrastinate till it's time to worry.
nubians love to be late, nubians hate to hurry....
Black Entertainment Television is the worst thing i've seen in my life!
...Usher, Michael Jackson is not a genre of music!...
I've seen what's around the corner,
I've seen what's over the horizon, and I promise you,
You nubians have nothing to celebrate."
 
2013-08-28 10:45:43 AM  

Lee Jackson Beauregard: at least until it enters the public domain in 2038

The Mouse ain't gonna let that happen.


Sadly, you're spot on.  Whenever Steamboat Willie comes up for copyright expiration, Disney starts paying off lawmakers for extensions.
 
2013-08-28 10:46:27 AM  

Frank N Stein: INeedAName: Frank N Stein: Frank N Stein: INeedAName: Frank N Stein: LBJ's war on poverty. Out of marriage births have been on the rise since the 60s.

Are you suggesting that welfare is to blame here? At the time LBJ gave that speech, the poverty rate was 19%, it currently sits at 16%.

And the poor access to contraceptives in a religiously conservative society has a lot to do with births. If the public school system was able to teach prevention and distribute condoms, I would wager much of that would be on the decline.

We weren't talking about poverty. We were talking about the crippling of the black family structure, as you put it.

And furthermore, the problem the modern black family structure is most rampant in urban areas, hardly "religiously conservative" societies.

Really? Because traditionally black Christian denominations tend to be some of the most conservative in the country. That's part of why the HIV/AIDS epidemic hit their community so heavily. No one was really able to talk about homosexuality or protected sex.

Is that so? Well, I suppose that's why blacks vote overwhelmingly for the most conservative candidate in national elections.


You can be religiously conservative and still vote Democratic. It might have something to do with most 'Conservative' candidates having little to no understanding or care for black issues in America. The fact that you don't understand that really just makes me feel like I'm wasting my time in this conversation.
 
2013-08-28 10:47:02 AM  

INeedAName: MugzyBrown: The real tragedy is that rather than people not be judged by the color of their skin, the US has become hyper race sensitive instead, where everybody's words and actions can be parsed and viewed through the 'is this racist' prism.

Black people and white people are often afraid of talking politics or current events because so often they're painted as black vs white

It's all very sad really.

Statements like this are most often made by people who have no understanding of the current racial situation in America and can't understand why people won't just 'let it go.' There is a massive chunk of the American population that is under represented politically, economically, and socially - but let's all pretend that has nothing to do with their race, and the social uphill battle they've been fighting for years.

People look for racism because, while it may not be rampant and overt in this country the way it was 50 years ago, it is still very much a part of some people's live. I'm sorry if that's hard for you to accept, but just because you don't experience, that's no reason to believe it doesn't exist.


People look for racism everywhere because the "civil rights" industry needs a self-perpetuating victim class so they can continue to extort corporate money to fuel their lavish lifestyles.  White people who dress poorly get followed in stores and get pulled over when they drive old cars in good neighborhoods just as often as Black people do.  Yet they keep pounding it into the heads of their constituents that every societal slight is the result of racism.  And the truly sad thing is that the miniscule number of racists who are out there feel empowered because of it.  Despite the fact that they have been totally marginalized, crying "racism" at every turn leads them to believe they are still having an impact and encourages them to keep doing what they think is getting under everyone's skin.
 
2013-08-28 10:47:54 AM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: He knew that his life would most likely be cut tragically short, in fact, he mentioned it almost prophetically in his final speech. If you're a poor, black widow living during that time, it's going to be very, very rough on you, and he made sure that his family was supported by his work. I have nothing but respect for that decision.


It was copyrighted after his death.
 
2013-08-28 10:48:02 AM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: DrSansabeltNoShiatSlacks: Hey, 20" rims ain't cheap!

This will be a good thread to add to my list of racists.

/you're not funny and it isn't ironic
//just sad


Please add me to your ignore list you cream jockey, water flaps, sugar taster, saddle shins, clink clunk, biscut neck, spoon face, apple picker, pinto, chin birrd, bucket ducker, dirty legs, door donkey, farker.

I am prety sure one of those terms would offend you.  Drity Leeeeegs!

I have no tollerance for the intollerant. It is a slippery slope.
 
2013-08-28 10:48:19 AM  

Cataholic: INeedAName: MugzyBrown: The real tragedy is that rather than people not be judged by the color of their skin, the US has become hyper race sensitive instead, where everybody's words and actions can be parsed and viewed through the 'is this racist' prism.

Black people and white people are often afraid of talking politics or current events because so often they're painted as black vs white

It's all very sad really.

Statements like this are most often made by people who have no understanding of the current racial situation in America and can't understand why people won't just 'let it go.' There is a massive chunk of the American population that is under represented politically, economically, and socially - but let's all pretend that has nothing to do with their race, and the social uphill battle they've been fighting for years.

People look for racism because, while it may not be rampant and overt in this country the way it was 50 years ago, it is still very much a part of some people's live. I'm sorry if that's hard for you to accept, but just because you don't experience, that's no reason to believe it doesn't exist.

People look for racism everywhere because the "civil rights" industry needs a self-perpetuating victim class so they can continue to extort corporate money to fuel their lavish lifestyles.  White people who dress poorly get followed in stores and get pulled over when they drive old cars in good neighborhoods just as often as Black people do.  Yet they keep pounding it into the heads of their constituents that every societal slight is the result of racism.  And the truly sad thing is that the miniscule number of racists who are out there feel empowered because of it.  Despite the fact that they have been totally marginalized, crying "racism" at every turn leads them to believe they are still having an impact and encourages them to keep doing what they think is getting under everyone's skin.


You're absolutely correct. Since some white people get looked at twice, racism is no longer an issue in America. Thank you for your astute observation. I'll head down to the capitol and tell everyone to go home.
 
2013-08-28 10:49:14 AM  

INeedAName: Frank N Stein: INeedAName: Frank N Stein: INeedAName: Frank N Stein: LBJ's war on poverty. Out of marriage births have been on the rise since the 60s.

Are you suggesting that welfare is to blame here? At the time LBJ gave that speech, the poverty rate was 19%, it currently sits at 16%.

And the poor access to contraceptives in a religiously conservative society has a lot to do with births. If the public school system was able to teach prevention and distribute condoms, I would wager much of that would be on the decline.

We weren't talking about poverty. We were talking about the crippling of the black family structure, as you put it.

And you suggested the 'war on poverty' as a root cause. If you're going to suggest a cause, shouldn't we talk about it?

Sure, we can talk about it. Ask away. But first I'd like you to admit that your theory is total bullocks on the grounds that the trouble with black family structure clearly began decades earlier than what you claimed "led" to its "shattering."

I find it interesting that you have offered nothing in the way of actual discussion of the issue. You've thrown out two phrases and then told me I was wrong. Especially as I didn't claim mandatory sentencing was the only cause of deterioration amongst the black family structure, but it's cool.


You talked about mandatory sentancing for crack, then said "This lead to a crippling of the black family structure (which was once extremely strong, as noted by the number of black youths being raised by grandparents) and a weakening of the community."

You can't lie when everyone can read your comments in the same farkig thread.
And no, you didn't explicitly state "this is not the only cause", but you did say that the sentancing rules directly lead to the state of black families.

Stop back peddling.
 
2013-08-28 10:49:34 AM  

Mugato: Just curious, how many other speeches have been copyrighted with families making money off of them? Honest question.


I heard an NPR interview with a Churchill biographer a while back. Apparently, he had to pay for every quote he used from one of Churchill's speeches, even though they were given as part of his public position.
 
2013-08-28 10:49:44 AM  

Witty Comment: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: I never said I was ignoring them. They go in gray 4, with a tag. Lots of people on fark tag posters to remind them who certain people are. And I've been contributing to the conversation, only to be told I'm full of "white guilt" for thinking that Martin Luther King Jr.'s family has the right to make money from his creative works the same way that Walt Disney's family continues to profit from his.

Are you chastising the idiot that said that? No. It's a huge double standard. It's okay to be racist, but the people who point out that other people are racist are the real problem. Because racists are such delicate little flowers or something.

No, I'm not. I'm chastising you. Why are you trying to deflect onto another person? Furthermore, why are you trying to give the impression that I'm saying it's okay to be racist? Even beyond that, where did you GET that impression? You need to EDUCATE people to change their minds, it's the only way. You're pointing fingers and screaming racist.

And I hope you recognize the irony of classifying people who you judge to be judgmental of another persons color of skin by designating them a color and marginalizing them.


I will put it to you bluntly, and simply - so that even a child can understand: The descendants of the enslavers don't get to tell the descendents of the enslaved when racism is "over".
As a white person, I am more than content with the privilege I have inherited in America, and I respect it's cost. I suggest you adopt the same philosophy. We got born on third base, dude - we didn't hit no triple. Act and react accordingly.
 
2013-08-28 10:50:50 AM  

Mugato: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: He knew that his life would most likely be cut tragically short, in fact, he mentioned it almost prophetically in his final speech. If you're a poor, black widow living during that time, it's going to be very, very rough on you, and he made sure that his family was supported by his work. I have nothing but respect for that decision.

It was copyrighted after his death.


You didn't even read the article, did you: "A few months after King delivered the speech, he sent a copy of the address to the U.S. Copyright office and listed the remarks as a "work not reproduced for sale." "
 
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