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(Some Guy)   Bill Watterson: Keeping it real since 1958   (zenpencils.com ) divider line
    More: Cool, Bill Watterson, Kenyon College  
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8225 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 Aug 2013 at 8:07 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-27 02:31:20 PM  
If you do spend your life in commercial art, it's good to both have perspective, and personal art you have 100% control over in your spare time.   That way you can stop giving a sh*t about the commercial output, and whether or not it gets used, or changed beyond recognition.    After 20 years I just don't care what happens to the art I get hired by other people to do, or if they ask me to make something stupid.   It's kind of like an office space moment.  Liberating.  I have my personal art and projects I'm very happy with.   If I didn't have that, I'd probably still get all worked up when someone wanted to change a graphic color scheme to puke green, or take a photograph in ultra-hipster style with blown out contrast.
 
2013-08-27 02:35:00 PM  

Egoy3k: Excess isn't exactly good but the fact is that it's subjective. If I buy a nice bottle of scotch the guy behind me buying a cheap bottle of rum may feel that my purchase is excessive meanwhile the guy buying a really nice bottle of scotch at the next register over thinks we are both peons.


This. The whole "be rebellious and forget about wealth and excess" thing rings so hollow in the current economy. It was written by someone who is clearly having no problem paying the bills. Right now, we just want to make enough to get by and pay down our debts.

I had the same feeling when I watched Into the Wild for the first time a year ago, just after I finally snapped an 18-month unemployment streak. The scene where he burns his cash practically made me facepalm.
 
2013-08-27 02:39:11 PM  

sure haven't: I guess maybe these things just don't apply to me so I see them the wrong way. There's something to be said for going for your dream, absolutely. It's just; the dream can only come true for so many people. I have more respect for a guy that does what he hates, because it puts a roof over his family, then the guy who quits the sure thing to try and "make it", meanwhile his kids go without.


What's worse, going without a father because he is too busy working or recovering, or going without the newest iPad?

I have very little respect for a person who hates the life they created for themselves.

(Here's a hint: He didn't have to breed first.)
 
2013-08-27 02:43:18 PM  

Kyosuke: What's worse, going without a father because he is too busy working or recovering, or going without the newest iPad?


Going without the newest iPad != Paying rent.

See my previous post.
 
2013-08-27 02:49:53 PM  

Fireproof: Kyosuke: What's worse, going without a father because he is too busy working or recovering, or going without the newest iPad?

Going without the newest iPad != Paying rent.

See my previous post.


At what point does Watterson talk about not earning a living? What did you do with your 18 months?
 
2013-08-27 03:02:30 PM  

Kyosuke: Fireproof: Kyosuke: What's worse, going without a father because he is too busy working or recovering, or going without the newest iPad?

Going without the newest iPad != Paying rent.

See my previous post.

At what point does Watterson talk about not earning a living? What did you do with your 18 months?


Two babies?

/hope not
 
2013-08-27 03:08:01 PM  
It took this to help me understand where my constant misplaced rage is coming from...life is passing me by while I work my ass off to make ends meet and I'm getting nowhere.(insert Ferris Bueller's monologue)

I never thought I would be in this position. I'm in a job that has truly global responsibilities working with every industry on, above, and below the earth, helping people all over the planet create solutions around our devices on both the back-end and field applications and everything in between.  And only a few of them actually RTFM.

I have not much to show for it except a mortgage on a fixer-upper house that still needs lots of fixing up, 2 paid-off cars, and 3 dependents that I am short-tempered with because every day is stressful since one small error could easily result in the loss of my job and everything else I have as a result. Have you had millions of lives potentially at risk if you don't answer the phone in the middle of the night?

I have many diverse ideas that could easily make millions of dollars a bunch of money and get me the time and financial freedom I need, but I can't create them on my own and not while I have that darn inventions clause in my employment contract. Freedom is so close I can almost taste it and that is the real frustrating part.

Sorry for the rant.
 
2013-08-27 03:09:03 PM  

Kyosuke: Fireproof: Kyosuke: What's worse, going without a father because he is too busy working or recovering, or going without the newest iPad?

Going without the newest iPad != Paying rent.

See my previous post.

At what point does Watterson talk about not earning a living? What did you do with your 18 months?


Struggle through a vast, hopeless economic wasteland before finding the commercial art compromise that I had always wanted.

I didn't say that Watterson said to not earn a living, I just said that his message of rejecting excess rings hollow if you're struggling, or worse yet, failing, to get by.
 
2013-08-27 03:23:30 PM  
So, is the wife in the comic following her passion too or does she now have to work at the soulless company at a job she hates because her husband wants to stay at home and paint dinosaurs?
 
2013-08-27 04:04:41 PM  

Khellendros: To artists and creative types - love the art, the act of creation and expression.  If your interest is in publishing, selling, or making money, you're doomed to spend your time fighting to be one of the handful that "makes it".  Why surrender your happiness, livelihood, and future to a low-percentage shot that has more to do with luck and almost nothing to do with talent?  Actors, painters, sculptors, dancers, musicians, etc. all face this issue.

Do what you need to do to keep a roof over your head, and spend the rest of your time in your art.  Fame is chancy, and cannot be the goal.  Maybe you'll be noticed.  Maybe you'll get to do it in front of coliseums of patrons, screaming your name and applauding.  Maybe your book will sell 1,000,000 copies.  Probably not.  Even talented and hard working, you'll likely spend your time as the 99.99% who wallow, hoping to "make it", and never doing do.  Be happy in the creation, screw what they think.

Love the art, not the fame.


I agree with a lot of this, especially the bit about it having almost nothing to do with talent. Life became a lot easier for me when I realized whether or not I land a job has less to do with my artistic skills and more to do with a complicated list of factors that are entirely outside of my control.

But I don't entirely agree with "love the art, not the fame". People constantly try to police an artist's motivations with this sentiment, and although it's noble, I find it a bit misguided. A lot of art boils down to communication, and fame is just the end result of that. An artist gives his/her audience a message, the audience (hopefully) talks about it. Telling an artist to ignore that feedback loop because the art itself is sacred is ... I don't know, naive? Some people do indeed do it for themselves, but for a lot of artists, it's hard to thrive if you don't know if your message is resonating.
 
2013-08-27 04:11:13 PM  

Egoy3k: Yeah but what if your passion is avarice and excess?


What if you're 0 for 3?
 
2013-08-27 11:01:10 PM  

Sairobi: But I don't entirely agree with "love the art, not the fame". People constantly try to police an artist's motivations with this sentiment, and although it's noble, I find it a bit misguided. A lot of art boils down to communication, and fame is just the end result of that. An artist gives his/her audience a message, the audience (hopefully) talks about it. Telling an artist to ignore that feedback loop because the art itself is sacred is ... I don't know, naive? Some people do indeed do it for themselves, but for a lot of artists, it's hard to thrive if you don't know if your message is resonating.


But I'd say that's different than "fame".  One can produce art, and show it to friends, family, small private galleries or restaurants, and share their message.  One can perform music in local clubs and small venues.  One can write and share it on innumerable websites on the internet.  If you're creating art, there is always an audience.  One can always get feedback and share their message.

But trying to "make it" is a different creature.  That's the attempt to get a major record deal, expand to a major gallery exhibit, get on Broadway, or get a novel published and on the NYT bestseller list.  This is where a lot of talent and dreams get ground into dust.  There's only a tiny, tiny window for people to enter this world, and it rarely has to do with talent.  The chase destroys most talent.

I'm certainly not trying to police motives.  I'd just like to see more artists happier with their art and working to better themselves without chasing some "acceptance" or material prize.  Far, far too many artists - many I know well - destroy themselves trying to gain a level of public acceptance and marketability, and miss the chance to really say something significant in that chase.  What they say may not be heard well in their lives, but the message will survive longer than the pop creations that strike money today.
 
2013-08-28 12:44:34 AM  

Firststepsadoozie: I told my wife I wanted to be a stay at home dad.
She pointed out that our youngest moved out a year and a half ago.


Remind her that at least one of them always comes back, you have to be at home to be prepared.
 
2013-08-28 03:57:55 AM  
I'll just leave this here.
 
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