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(ABC 27)   Hard to believe that a couple has been married for 65 years, harder yet is they die 11 hours apart. Definitely inseparable   (abc27.com) divider line 58
    More: Sad, Dayton Daily News, farmhouse  
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3370 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Aug 2013 at 4:41 AM (47 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-27 12:14:51 PM

imfallen_angel: Both my grandmother and mother died while both my grandfather and father lived many years after, both living life simply because they were afraid of dying, but not really living, just wasting away, day after day, going in homes, waiting it out.

Due to health issues for both myself and my wife, I can't tell how long we have, considering that many relatives have both died young, others quite old, but then again, my sister just died at 46 from cancer not 2 years ago (same year as my father passed away).

I know that for me and my wife, we both know that we'd never find anyone else that would come close to what we have.. if I was to go, I don't know what I'd want her to do aside to live best she could, so to see all the things that I'll miss out on...such as grandkids, etc. one day, etc. and I believe that she'd say the same... for finding someone else, I really don't know... because the loneliness would eventually be too much?


i3.kym-cdn.com

I'm going to just go somewhere and drink for a while.
 
2013-08-27 12:23:50 PM
 
2013-08-27 01:12:23 PM
At the time my dad passed away 4 months ago my parents were married 66 years. My mom is struggling, understandably. She's 88 years old. We are doing our best to keep her busy and her spirits up.
 
2013-08-27 02:18:28 PM

BKITU: This is not sad. This is a beautiful thing in a hard world.


This is all that can be hoped for, the best possible end. My husband and I have been together 37 years and we are only in our early 50s. If we live as long as this couple, we'll have been married over 70 years.
 
2013-08-27 02:21:43 PM

tetsoushima: I'm going to just go somewhere and drink for a while.


Well, what brought my "view" about this is ..well.. everything about my life.

My mother died when I was 13, she loved life overall, loved gadgets, children, and such, and she missed out on her grandchildren, on technology.. on so many aspects of life.

I discovered that there was so much to explore, learn, etc. and yes, the tacky "made every day count"...

So that every day that has passed since her death, she's missed out... she never got to see grandkids, never got to play with them, see them grow, didn't get to see what I've done in my life, nor meet my wife, see what the world had done, the changes, she'd go nuts for the internet and the gadgets, phones, tablets, etc.  And the food that she never got to try, etc. there's just so much.

Then I look at my father who lived... I introduced him to CDs, then to DVDs, while he lived in a room in a home that was maybe 12x18 large, including a companion that he took (as much as he missed my mom, who had been his great love, he couldn't stay alone and did hook up with a few women (long story but pretty pathetic) and ended up with a woman that was very nice, but was simply so not to be alone.

He pretty much waited to die, did virtually did nothing... the biggest thing was a group trip to Nashville (as he was a country music fan) that he did a couple of years after my mom's death.

Side note, the home where he ended up in was a 1.5 hour trip out of town where my other siblings dumped him (my siblings are a whole different pathetic story).

He was happy to see the grandkids when I could visit (but eventually couldn't due to my handicapped child being too difficult to take on trips) and my siblings (one brother in particular) made it very difficult on my father, to which I simply withdrew to stop having my father be put in the middle (by my brother who couldn't stand that I'd go see him... a very long and very nasty story).
.. through life, I did learn a few things... and it's a question that when you die, you do leave those that love you behind, and you do miss out on everything that will follow.

So even as a getting-older adult, I do miss my mother, not just for her presence, but for all the things that she's missed on, all the things I would love to share with her.

And now, looking at the fact that I am older than she was when she died, it's a huge perspective to have, had I died at the same age, I would have already missed on all the things that these many years have brought to me.

So, looking at it with the point of view of my life, my wife, my marriage, my children, etc. I try to see it with the point of view of not wanting to miss out of the future.  There's a huge part of me that I know wouldn't want to go on without my wife, but then, there's the children, the one that's handicapped will need someone until her death comes, so I would have to do my best to go on and in my heart, I would live my life with my wife in my heart, somehow sharing it still with her... and I would want the same from her should I be the first to go.
 
2013-08-27 07:58:40 PM
I thought this was going to be a rehash of the old couple that died in a car crash.
 
2013-08-27 09:55:06 PM
No, it's not hard to believe. Not at all.
 
2013-08-27 10:35:57 PM

imfallen_angel: tetsoushima: I'm going to just go somewhere and drink for a while.

Well, what brought my "view" about this is ..well.. everything about my life.

My mother died when I was 13, she loved life overall, loved gadgets, children, and such, and she missed out on her grandchildren, on technology.. on so many aspects of life.

I discovered that there was so much to explore, learn, etc. and yes, the tacky "made every day count"...

So that every day that has passed since her death, she's missed out... she never got to see grandkids, never got to play with them, see them grow, didn't get to see what I've done in my life, nor meet my wife, see what the world had done, the changes, she'd go nuts for the internet and the gadgets, phones, tablets, etc.  And the food that she never got to try, etc. there's just so much.

Then I look at my father who lived... I introduced him to CDs, then to DVDs, while he lived in a room in a home that was maybe 12x18 large, including a companion that he took (as much as he missed my mom, who had been his great love, he couldn't stay alone and did hook up with a few women (long story but pretty pathetic) and ended up with a woman that was very nice, but was simply so not to be alone.

He pretty much waited to die, did virtually did nothing... the biggest thing was a group trip to Nashville (as he was a country music fan) that he did a couple of years after my mom's death.

Side note, the home where he ended up in was a 1.5 hour trip out of town where my other siblings dumped him (my siblings are a whole different pathetic story).

He was happy to see the grandkids when I could visit (but eventually couldn't due to my handicapped child being too difficult to take on trips) and my siblings (one brother in particular) made it very difficult on my father, to which I simply withdrew to stop having my father be put in the middle (by my brother who couldn't stand that I'd go see him... a very long and very nasty story).
.. through life, I did learn a fe ...


www.hsilondon.co.uk

 I'll tell you why I'm lying here... but God forgive me... and God help us all...
 
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