Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Science Daily)   Haters do, in fact, gotta hate. Here comes the science   (sciencedaily.com) divider line 30
    More: Interesting, Journal of Personality, personality traits, print share, religiosity, social psychologies, Justin Hepler  
•       •       •

2215 clicks; posted to Geek » on 26 Aug 2013 at 3:28 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



30 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-08-26 01:55:15 PM  
yourenotspecialbecause.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-08-26 02:03:09 PM  
blogs.browardpalmbeach.com
The leading researcher
 
2013-08-26 02:04:02 PM  
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-08-26 02:04:39 PM  
This link is stupid.
 
2013-08-26 03:30:15 PM  
matthershberger.com
 
2013-08-26 03:31:38 PM  
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-08-26 03:31:48 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2013-08-26 03:37:57 PM  
fc09.deviantart.net
 
2013-08-26 03:39:24 PM  
These researchers sound like bitter betas.

I'm sure they're really great guys to the chicks they just want to fark.
 
2013-08-26 03:40:50 PM  
i.qkme.me
 
2013-08-26 03:44:50 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2013-08-26 03:47:03 PM  
This article brings up some very interesting points

OR

What a horrible writing style
 
2013-08-26 03:48:08 PM  
I noticed that liking and appreciating things generally comes with a sort of naivete. If you get into a new form of music, for instance, you tend to like all of it because you have not yet acquired a discriminating ear for what is good and what is not. Or the first time you ride a rollercoaster or drink a beer: You don't care, you just like it.

But liking things and being entertained by them has an effect of diminishing returns, such that each subsequent exposure brings less excitement and happiness, and you're forced to seek more if it, in more potent forms, to maintain the enthusiasm (like drugs). The first time you ride a rollercoaster is fun. The 50th time, not so much. The first slasher film is scary. The 12th sequel is cliche. Our search for that which entertains us is a process of constantly searching for novelty because over-exposure makes things banal and predictable.

So eventually one becomes so well-versed in the subject that they develop a "taste" for what is enjoyable and what's not. Wine and beer snobs. Movies. Comic books... what have you. These people are typically called "bitter and jaded" by neophytes, but the truth is they have amassed such an immense amount of experience that it's difficult to find anything exciting anymore.

And because of their status, they tend to become "gatekeepers" of that which they used to love and they dislike any change or progression, like your parents constantly boasting about the greatness of their stupid Vietnam music.

The simple reaction is to call them a "hater". But truth be known, there are two classes of haters. I've only spoken of one: The hater who hates things because it doesn't meet the standards that they've achieved through years of exposure. This is the hater you should probably listen to, because they can list reasons why they hate. They have rational arguments. Whether they are right or wrong is a different discussion, but you can't ignore that they are hating from a position of wisdom and experience.

The second class of hater hates things because they're popular. This is the dialectical material hater: The Hegelian backlash to whatever has reached critical mass in the pop culture zeitgeist: Justin Bieber, Lady Gaga, Starbucks, Facebook, dubstep, The Dark Knight trilogy, whatever. Really, this is the devil's advocate hater: Whatever everyone else likes, they hate (especially if it's something that they normally wouldn't be into anyway). You might chalk this up to jealousy or some other shallow excuse, but really this hater just wants to stand out as an individual and the best way to do that is to rail against pop culture. And they cultivate an identity with this behavior, so if whatever they like gets popular too, they'll suddenly start hating it as well. Hipsters do this constantly. This hater usually has nothing of any value to say and you can safely ignore them.
 
2013-08-26 03:52:20 PM  
The study is rather silly in describing a general "negative disposition" without mentioning that the negative thing is judged against something positive.

For example I may hate McDonalds pseudo-food (except the fries) because I would much rather eat many of the better alternatives.

A better description might be that "haters" become fixed and strongly attached to their notions of what is good and proper - somewhat akin to "snobbism". But there is a difference between being open to new things  vs. being open to anything (and loving McDonalds).
 
2013-08-26 03:57:11 PM  
People think they are special and different from others because of what they don't like and how picky they can afford to be. More news at 11.
 
2013-08-26 04:01:35 PM  

Ishkur: I noticed that liking and appreciating t ...


TL;DR Haters are totes legit until they hate something what I like.
 
2013-08-26 04:06:59 PM  
i7.photobucket.com
 
2013-08-26 04:14:19 PM  
Things you like are still gay.
 
2013-08-26 04:21:17 PM  
Don't get Haiti

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-08-26 04:26:57 PM  

HairBolus: The study is rather silly in describing a general "negative disposition" without mentioning that the negative thing is judged against something positive.


I do not know where these people got their degrees, it is embarrassing.

FTA: Apparently, it's all part of our individual personality -- a dimension that researchers have coined "dispositional attitude."

OK. Stop right there. That phrase is redundant. In psychological jargon "attitude" by definition refers to one's disposition.  If one isn't disposed to it, it isn't an attitude.

The dispositional attitude construct represents a new perspective in which attitudes are not simply a function of the properties of the stimuli under consideration, but are also a function of the properties of the evaluator,"

LOL. WAT?  Where on earth did these people get their degree. Some bullshiat school on cognitive psychology, no doubt.
 
2013-08-26 04:35:54 PM  
i1078.photobucket.com
 
2013-08-26 04:39:09 PM  

Ishkur: I noticed ...


This is a good post.

Unless it becomes popular.
 
2013-08-26 05:28:36 PM  

mediablitz: This article brings up some very interesting points

OR

What a horrible writing style


I found it relatively comprehensible.  I agree that it probably falls a bit far to the left on the sliding scale of technical to basic for the audience Science Daily usually goes for, though.
 
2013-08-26 05:46:53 PM  

Ishkur: The second class of hater hates things because they're popular. This is the dialectical material hater: The Hegelian backlash to whatever has reached critical mass in the pop culture zeitgeist: Justin Bieber, Lady Gaga, Starbucks, Facebook, dubstep, The Dark Knight trilogy, whatever. Really, this is the devil's advocate hater: Whatever everyone else likes, they hate (especially if it's something that they normally wouldn't be into anyway). You might chalk this up to jealousy or some other shallow excuse, but really this hater just wants to stand out as an individual and the best way to do that is to rail against pop culture. And they cultivate an identity with this behavior, so if whatever they like gets popular too, they'll suddenly start hating it as well. Hipsters do this constantly. This hater usually has nothing of any value to say and you can safely ignore them.


So what do you call someone starts to hate something as a visceral reaction to the constant, relentless, pervasive marketing that attempts to make him like that thing?
 
2013-08-26 06:22:34 PM  
images.cryhavok.org
 
2013-08-26 06:59:17 PM  

SmackLT: The leading researcher


I don't even know you and I hate you. I hope all the bad things in life happen to you and only you.

/came to this thread for this reference
//off to sip my drink I'm sure someone has spit in
 
2013-08-26 07:09:38 PM  
mrwgifs.com
 
2013-08-26 08:28:30 PM  

Ishkur: I noticed that liking and appreciating things generally comes with a sort of naivete. If you get into a new form of music, for instance, you tend to like all of it because you have not yet acquired a discriminating ear for what is good and what is not. Or the first time you ride a rollercoaster or drink a beer: You don't care, you just like it.

But liking things and being entertained by them has an effect of diminishing returns, such that each subsequent exposure brings less excitement and happiness, and you're forced to seek more if it, in more potent forms, to maintain the enthusiasm (like drugs). The first time you ride a rollercoaster is fun. The 50th time, not so much. The first slasher film is scary. The 12th sequel is cliche. Our search for that which entertains us is a process of constantly searching for novelty because over-exposure makes things banal and predictable.

So eventually one becomes so well-versed in the subject that they develop a "taste" for what is enjoyable and what's not. Wine and beer snobs. Movies. Comic books... what have you. These people are typically called "bitter and jaded" by neophytes, but the truth is they have amassed such an immense amount of experience that it's difficult to find anything exciting anymore.

And because of their status, they tend to become "gatekeepers" of that which they used to love and they dislike any change or progression, like your parents constantly boasting about the greatness of their stupid Vietnam music.

The simple reaction is to call them a "hater". But truth be known, there are two classes of haters. I've only spoken of one: The hater who hates things because it doesn't meet the standards that they've achieved through years of exposure. This is the hater you should probably listen to, because they can list reasons why they hate. They have rational arguments. Whether they are right or wrong is a different discussion, but you can't ignore that they are hating from a position of wisdom and experienc ...


24.media.tumblr.com

OG Hater
 
2013-08-27 04:21:01 AM  

Ishkur: I noticed that liking and appreciating things generally comes with a sort of naivete. If you get into a new form of music, for instance, you tend to like all of it because you have not yet acquired a discriminating ear for what is good and what is not. Or the first time you ride a rollercoaster or drink a beer: You don't care, you just like it. ...


This is a brilliant post. I think I used to fall into category 2. A long process of analyzing why I hated things, and knocking it off has made me both a happier person, and a better person to be around. As stupid as it sounds, the South Park episode "You're getting old" was the wakeup call I needed to stop acting like that. I didn't want to be a bummer to be around anymore.

Expanding your horizons, taking in a wider variety of media, foods and personalities makes everything else seem better. Your job, your friends, what's on TV all stop sucking, when you stop making their flaws the only thing you concentrate on. Change your path to work sometimes, drink a glass of wine instead of a beer, change your life incrementally and deliberately and you'll find yourself happier. Finding joy and silliness in the things that used to piss you off is the most uplifting thing you can do for yourself. Go to a farking Ke$ha concert, realize that people there aren't just stupid, they're having a good time and you're missing out on it because of you, not them.
 
2013-08-27 07:19:10 AM  
i43.tinypic.com
 
Displayed 30 of 30 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report