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(Huffington Post)   SOPA is back. This is not a repeat from every single month of the last four years   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 67
    More: Fail, SOPA, Obama administration, Jason Mraz, Department of Commerce, proposal, Justin Beiber, popular songs  
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67 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-08-26 09:48:01 AM  
I knew the powers that be wouldn't give up SOPA.  The internet had that big victory when everybody came together to protest it, but the money that wants it is patient and will keep coming.
 
2013-08-26 09:57:49 AM  
SOPA is back.

This is the story of two parties. Republican and Democratic. These are the conservatives, and these are the liberals, and this is SOPA.

/Confused?  You won't be after this episode of SOPA.
 
2013-08-26 10:00:18 AM  
Monied interests will always try to destroy America.  That's why it was a much nicer country back when the top tax rate was over 70%.
 
2013-08-26 10:07:04 AM  
As a computer professional, I find it hilarious that people think it's possible to stop piracy.  If you can view/listen to/play it, you can copy it.  That's just how data works.
 
182
2013-08-26 10:13:44 AM  

nekom: As a computer professional, I find it hilarious that people think it's possible to stop piracy.  If you can view/listen to/play it, you can copy it.  That's just how data works.


just another reason to fill the prisons.
 
2013-08-26 10:15:33 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: Monied interests will always try to destroy America.  That's why it was a much nicer country back when the top tax rate was over 70%.


If it gets much worse, we'll just have to take the top 10% of their body-weight.   That's called the French Tax.
 
2013-08-26 10:16:34 AM  
Oh geez. The Internet Policy Task Force, stated that under current law, copying a copyrighted work from me to you can be a felony, while steaming the same work from me to you can't be a felony. The IPTF proposed that the laws to updated so that streaming=copying.
 
2013-08-26 10:16:46 AM  
Yeah it's not going away. They're going to get that through one way or another.
 
2013-08-26 10:18:38 AM  

ikanreed: Marcus Aurelius: Monied interests will always try to destroy America.  That's why it was a much nicer country back when the top tax rate was over 70%.

If it gets much worse, we'll just have to take the top 10% of their body-weight.   That's called the French Tax.


Off with her... Leg up to the calf?
 
2013-08-26 10:19:43 AM  

182: nekom: As a computer professional, I find it hilarious that people think it's possible to stop piracy.  If you can view/listen to/play it, you can copy it.  That's just how data works.

just another reason to fill the prisons.


For-profit businesses do not do well in a shrinking market, so it only makes good economic sense to create as many new potential felons as possible.  The privileged kids will have daddy pay the right lawyers in any case, meaning this is a "criminal justice" win-win all the way around.
 
2013-08-26 10:19:43 AM  

MindStalker: Oh geez. The Internet Policy Task Force, stated that under current law, copying a copyrighted work from me to you can be a felony, while steaming the same work from me to you can't be a felony. The IPTF proposed that the laws to updated so that streaming=copying.


This and we really can't afford another Beiber in this world
 
2013-08-26 10:19:43 AM  
This is SOPA king ridiculous.
 
2013-08-26 10:20:14 AM  
My conscience has come to the following conclusion:  If I ever run into a musician (or actor/director, etc... I guess) who is the "victim" of my illegal streaming, I will hand him or her $20 and say "thanks" for the valued entertainment.
I suppose if I find that you're a sound technician or cameraman I can buy you a beer or a zagnut or something.
 
2013-08-26 10:20:19 AM  
SOPA....

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-08-26 10:21:17 AM  
Al Franken owes the entertainment industry big. He will make sure SOPA passes.
 
2013-08-26 10:21:17 AM  
oh boy, here we go again

/so many bought out politicians, so many times they'll try this shiat again
 
2013-08-26 10:21:38 AM  
Fire the IPTF. While we're at it, disband DHS and scale down all the other bloated overreaching agencys and put the USPS to sleep. Put all that money into finding /creating productive jobs for those people, and watch approval ratings skyrocket.

You can send me a check upon reelection Barack.
 
2013-08-26 10:21:54 AM  
the SO-PA's back, and you're gonna be in trouble..
hey now, hey now the SO-PA's back
 
2013-08-26 10:21:57 AM  
I'm pissed off it's like this, but how will this affect actual enforcement?
 
2013-08-26 10:22:21 AM  
President Obama has made it clear that you all do not matter.
 
2013-08-26 10:22:25 AM  

182: nekom: As a computer professional, I find it hilarious that people think it's possible to stop piracy.  If you can view/listen to/play it, you can copy it.  That's just how data works.

just another reason to fill the prisons.


Nah, prisons are just for the poor, and brown skinned people.  This is so the gov't can impose higher taxes on the ISP's, who in turn raise your rates and slow down traffic, in the interest of "National Security".  It's much more profitable that way.
 
2013-08-26 10:22:53 AM  
Good grief, this is ridiculous.  The public has made it abundantly clear that they do not agree with this legislation, but they keep throwing it up against the wall hoping that the outrage will eventually fade.

Hopefully the EFF gives 'em  hell and starts rallying support to fight this immediately.
 
2013-08-26 10:23:49 AM  
Quickly! Mobilize the pale and stinky Internet hordes! Nothing shall stop the flow of cat pictures and Gabe Newell erotic bondage literature.
 
2013-08-26 10:24:03 AM  
Don't like the laws? Delete all your online accounts and don't get online again.

The next thing you know, not having an online account will be a felony.

I weep for my children's future.
 
2013-08-26 10:24:28 AM  
Somali pirates have just boarded your server and are sqeezing your backbone.

clipsandcomment.com
 
2013-08-26 10:25:40 AM  
All of the protests against this should use Aaron Swartz's picture as a reminder of what he died for. I guess, now that they got him out of the way they're just going to continue on trying to push this tripe through again
 
2013-08-26 10:28:16 AM  
Haven't kept up on technology?
Can't compete in the modern entertainment world?
Don't have a clue how to get content into consumers' hands without going through Wal-Mart?
Audiences ignoring your reused and recycled crap and turning to other sources of entertainment?

No problem!

Introducing SOPA!

SOPA makes it a felony to do anything that every 12-year-old with a broadband connection has figured out how to do. And since your government doesn't remotely have enough law enforcement, prosecutors, or judges to go after any of these "offenders," you can just everyone into poverty! That will surely bring you back into competitive business practice.

/we should make a mock-commercial out of this. And post it all over YouTube, Dailymotion, and anywhere else we can find.
//Netflix might actually help us produce it
 
2013-08-26 10:29:28 AM  
Time to recirculate this, I guess.
i.imgur.com
 
2013-08-26 10:29:49 AM  
So - let me get this straight -

SOPA and PIPA and whatever this bill is ... seek to give law enforcement the authority to block / alter DNS tables on Servers located in the US ?

Is that right?
 
2013-08-26 10:30:17 AM  
Step 1: Open the "Green paper" using the link in TFA
Step 2: Scroll to page 115
Step 3: RAAAAAAAGE
 
2013-08-26 10:31:10 AM  
Does the law itself use the term streaming?  There is a client and a server (and potentially intermediary program).  Are all of these on the hit list?  It could make going to any website that streams illegal?
 
2013-08-26 10:31:36 AM  
Hmmm.... You tube uploads? No one seems to get money from suing the tube. Plus anyone can download their streaming content as it is.

I don't get it... illegal downloads are where it all happens- not illegal streaming.
 
2013-08-26 10:31:41 AM  
Does this one have language making VPNs illegal? I give it 3 years before they try to pass that one.
 
2013-08-26 10:31:41 AM  
It is slot machine lawmaking.  Keep putting in coins (bills) and pulling the level (voting) until you get the result that you want.
 
2013-08-26 10:33:38 AM  
While I agree the law is bad, I also really farking hate nerds. So I am torn.
 
2013-08-26 10:34:26 AM  
 
2013-08-26 10:34:30 AM  

rubi_con_man: So - let me get this straight -

SOPA and PIPA and whatever this bill is ... seek to give law enforcement the authority to block / alter DNS tables on Servers located in the US ?

Is that right?


Actually, on page 74 (of the PDF, numbered page 64 of the document) it seems to suggest the DNS hijacking provision is still dead in the water.
 
2013-08-26 10:35:24 AM  

EvilEgg: I knew the powers that be wouldn't give up SOPA


No they won't.  It is just like the votes for 'Casino Gambling' in our area (and others have said it happened in their areas too).  The casino's got the issue on the ballot and it was voted down.  They put it on the ballot again and it gets voted down again.  After 5 or 6 times the issue finally passed and once passed it is impossible to reverse.  SOPA will come up again and again.  It will pass at some point and once it does it can never be reversed.
 
2013-08-26 10:35:50 AM  

Obama's Reptiloid Master: While I agree the law is bad, I also really farking hate nerds. So I am torn.


Ur doin it wrong.

/neeeerrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrds!
 
2013-08-26 10:38:02 AM  
There's apparently a system already in place on YouTube where either bots or the copyright holder themselves recognize it as their work and can claim a copyright on their work posted by someone else. The videos are typically kept up as the owners get a share of ad revenue and a link to purchase the work is displayed on the page.

Since there already is the ability to recognize copyrighted material and automatic means will only get better with time - why not monetize the process?

File sharers and streamers could do whatever they want, but would get charged X amount for each copyrighted work which would later show up on their ISP bill; a digital tollbooth. It may not catch every single instance, but perhaps a majority of it.

There would still be the issue of what services such as Amazon and iTunes would have to offer versus, for example, file sharing - perhaps file sharing being much more expensive, but legal.
 
2013-08-26 10:38:32 AM  

Carn: Obama's Reptiloid Master: While I agree the law is bad, I also really farking hate nerds. So I am torn.

Ur doin it wrong.

/neeeerrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrds!


Fun ORM fact: I am Ogre.
 
2013-08-26 10:39:12 AM  

rubi_con_man: So - let me get this straight -

SOPA and PIPA and whatever this bill is ... seek to give law enforcement the authority to block / alter DNS tables on Servers located in the US ?

Is that right?


That was one of the truly stupid parts, yes.  The bills gave power to copyright holders to ask that ISP's block certain DNS names (suspected of hosting pirated material) from resolving and return a "parked" page.

/Stupid as in "I have no concept of the Law of Unintended Consequences or how the Internet Works" Stupid.
 
2013-08-26 10:40:02 AM  
I feel freer already!
 
2013-08-26 10:40:32 AM  
upload.wikimedia.org www.davidcosgrove.com 

What is it with congress and doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results? Are they really that insane?

There's a pretty well organized group of people including the EFF, ACLU , and EPIC. Not that I suggest becoming complacent, we need to be heard every time this tomfoolery happens.

Or is it a run to get legislation passed before the next election cycle happens?
 
2013-08-26 10:42:18 AM  

abfalter: It is slot machine lawmaking.  Keep putting in coins (bills) and pulling the level (voting) until you get the result that you want.


Surprised they didn't do the old rename/rebrand trick and call it the "American Freedom and Eagle Tears Act", or some such shiat.
 
2013-08-26 10:44:00 AM  

The Irresponsible Captain: Or is it a run to get legislation passed before the next election cycle happens?


Why would they care about that? Most of the people on the internet couldn't possibly care less about this and won't alter their votes if it passes and, politically, this is fairly popular on both sides of the aisle. Hell, one of the people who will be lobbying hardest for it is a former democratic senator.

The only thing that's still bipartisan in D.C. is legalized bribery (thanks Supreme Court!) and the interests in this are more than happy to spray cash at both parties. Don't expect it to matter which party is sitting in those seats when or if it comes up for a vote.
 
2013-08-26 10:45:55 AM  
fark you, autoplay

They keep trying because they know once something is voted for it'll never go away. The constitution should be amended to require a 2/3 majority for all bills to pass and all bills must sunset after 2 years.
 
2013-08-26 10:45:56 AM  
Well sure they can't try to repeal Obama care everyday.
 
2013-08-26 10:46:21 AM  
Media bigshots really, REALLY hate it when they don't have all your money. Every day. Forever.
 
2013-08-26 10:47:19 AM  

GoodDoctorB: Surprised they didn't do the old rename/rebrand trick and call it the "American Freedom and Eagle Tears Act", or some such shiat.


America's Sensible Streaming For Undeniably Cute Kids act

/ it's for the children!
// cute ones with wide eyes!
 
2013-08-26 10:48:58 AM  

Bloody William: I'm pissed off it's like this, but how will this affect actual enforcement?


Shoot everyone. Arrest everyone.
 
2013-08-26 10:49:28 AM  
Eventually it will pass because there is too much money behind it funding politicians campaign accounts.
 
2013-08-26 10:52:56 AM  

zvoidx: File sharers and streamers could do whatever they want, but would get charged X amount for each copyrighted work which would later show up on their ISP bill; a digital tollbooth.


In theory a great idea, in practice a clusterfark.  We've already seen youtube's bots mistakenly tag all kinds of things as copyright violations. Even if you improve the accuracy, you're not going to code a bot that understands fair use.

Then there's the fraud issue. I tell your ISP that obscure Albanian film you're streaming is something that I own the copyright on and to please send me some money. How do they verify my claim?

That's before we figure out what the appropriate toll is. What is that Albanian film's royalty rate? If it is based on the number of views or viewers (and that would make sense), if it goes viral, do I go bankrupt?
 
2013-08-26 10:53:36 AM  
TL;DR

Will someone please summarize this to one sentence and give me a link where I can be outraged and sign a petition 100 times?
 
2013-08-26 10:53:41 AM  
clkeagle:

SOPA makes it a felony to do anything that every 12-year-old with a broadband connection has figured out how to do. And since your government doesn't remotely have enough law enforcement, prosecutors, or judges to go after any of these "offenders," you can just everyone into poverty! That will surely bring you back into competitive business practice.

That's pretty much it, isn't it? Just everyone right into it. lol

Aside from that, SOPA doesn't really have staying power. Congress knows they still don't have enough support, and they're probably doing some of the illegal stuff anyway. But go ahead and beat that dead horse, large commingling of old people who don't know how the Internet works. While you're at it, those Repeal Obamacare rhetorics are getting a little dust on them, might want to get on that horse too.
 
2013-08-26 10:56:08 AM  

dognose4: Does the law itself use the term streaming?  There is a client and a server (and potentially intermediary program).  Are all of these on the hit list?  It could make going to any website that streams illegal?


Nope. It's really just moving willful infringement of the public performance right from a misdemeanor to a felony, and would only apply to the server, not the client. You could try to make an argument that the client is liable for contributory infringement, but that hasn't been tested.
 
2013-08-26 11:00:40 AM  
I suspect this is aimed at streaming of cable channels. I'm surprised there isn't already a lot of this going on. I've been expecting someone to set up a way for everyone to get these, either a peer to peer streaming system (Napster for tv channels) or one big service offshore with a cheap subscription.

I'd think the peer to peer would be the way to go. Monetize it by making people pay for access to the VPN that keeps the stream from being recognized by your ISP. Maybe the computing overhead or something else doesn't make that practical yet, it's beyond my level of geekery.
 
2013-08-26 11:01:42 AM  

MisterRonbo: zvoidx: File sharers and streamers could do whatever they want, but would get charged X amount for each copyrighted work which would later show up on their ISP bill; a digital tollbooth.

In theory a great idea, in practice a clusterfark.  We've already seen youtube's bots mistakenly tag all kinds of things as copyright violations. Even if you improve the accuracy, you're not going to code a bot that understands fair use.

Then there's the fraud issue. I tell your ISP that obscure Albanian film you're streaming is something that I own the copyright on and to please send me some money. How do they verify my claim?

That's before we figure out what the appropriate toll is. What is that Albanian film's royalty rate? If it is based on the number of views or viewers (and that would make sense), if it goes viral, do I go bankrupt?


You have a point.

Perhaps in the future there would be a a trusted, centralized place where all parties involved would have access to the information, with the registered copyright claims and comparisons showing how it was infringed.

Maybe it's just a matter of the technology catching up with the concept.
 
2013-08-26 11:02:36 AM  

Random Anonymous Blackmail: Eventually it will pass because there is too much money behind it funding politicians campaign accounts.


The only hope I have is the Internet community's tendancy to be insanely obsessive.

Would be inspiring if SOPA did keep coming up, and the Googles of the world fought it as hard as they did last time, every time, forever.

While I'm at it, I'd also like a pony.
 
2013-08-26 11:05:51 AM  

TV's Vinnie: Bloody William: I'm pissed off it's like this, but how will this affect actual enforcement?

Shoot everyone. Arrest everyone.


So.... Oakland?
 
2013-08-26 11:15:11 AM  
In the twentieth century and to the present day Colton has been read most frequently perhaps in quotation books, including Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, where many of his aphorisms have been preserved.
One of Colton's most famous quotes..."Imitation is the sincerest [form] of flattery".[


I guess Charlie never heard of YouTube.
 
2013-08-26 11:19:05 AM  

ChipNASA: SOPA....


Yum!!! My favorite
 
2013-08-26 11:34:26 AM  
WTF mods? Pulled the thread because it's a duplicate of another thread....that's nowhere near the font page anymore?

Seriously, WTF?!
 
2013-08-26 11:37:35 AM  

GoodDoctorB: WTF mods? Pulled the thread because it's a duplicate of another thread....that's nowhere near the font page anymore?

Seriously, WTF?!


Yeah, again.... Repeat... from August SEVENTH?! Seriously?

I thought the "fark hearts SOPA" shiat was a joke... Someone towing the line?
 
2013-08-26 12:33:24 PM  

GoodDoctorB: I thought the "fark hearts SOPA" shiat was a joke... Someone towing the line?


You must have missed the white out.
 
2013-08-26 01:09:44 PM  

Cybernetic: GoodDoctorB: I thought the "fark hearts SOPA" shiat was a joke... Someone towing the line?

You must have missed the white out.


I didn't, merely hyperbole.

Just really, really don't get why we liters can't have this discussion again.

Not sure something is truly a "repeat" nineteen days later. What is the limit on how many times we're allowed by mods to discuss a topic, even if it is linked to the same article? Once a month? A quarter? A year?
 
2013-08-26 07:34:35 PM  
(Wrote it elsewhere, applies here too)

Washington, DC (AP) - Today, federal lawmakers, working alongside lobbyists from the RIAA, the MPAA, Sony Music Entertainment and more than a dozen other concerned parties, passed the 2,972 page Business Opportunity protection and Help for Intellectual property-holding Corporations Act, or BOHICA for short.

The law, which contains "controversial" provisions which extend copyright on creative works indefinitely and requires ISPs turn over user information on demand from copyright holders, was the brainchild of Rep.Lamar Smith (R-Texas) and Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vermont), who worked closely with legal representatives of the MPAA and RIAA who assisted in writing the final draft of the bill.  "We believe that the lifeblood of America's position as an economic and technological leader of the free world is dependent on intellectual property rights," said Representative Smith in an interview at his office Wednesday, smiling as he lovingly caressed the briefcase filled with neat stacks of hundred dollar bills to his right on his office desk.  "This truly bipartisan legislation will allow government and law enforcement to work in a synergistic, mutually-supportive fashion with copyright-holding companies to protect the labor of so many hardworking people--the attorneys, the politicians, upper-level management, stockholders, lobbyists, CEOs, and our finest corporate citizens--who together form the strong backbone of this great nation."

When asked if the new law, which among many other things makes it legal for companies to sue customers on evidence as flimsy as their ownership of a computer with an optical drive, essentially grants perpetual ownership of works yet to be created by an author to that author's present employer, makes encryption flatly illegal, paves the way towards the removal of anonymity from all online activities from US internet users, allow for indefinite imprisonment of copyright violators until all fines are paid, and would require ISPs to constantly and aggressively monitor all customers for indications of illegal activity online, had any potential for misuse, Representative Smith said, "No, I don't believe it does."  Then he chuckled quietly while stroking his white cat, Mittens, as thunder pealed in the background.  "In fact, I think it will work precisely as intended." The interview ended as Smith began laughing maniacally.  It was impossible to reach Leahy at his office for comment, as the Senator was off on an all-expenses-paid couple's retreat at Lake Tahoe, Nevada, a gift from Sony.

"This law represents a significant breakthrough in US-Corporate relations," said former senator Chris Dodd, Chairman and CEO of the MPAA.  "We've worked hard for years to improve our aquisition and utilization of our customers' hard-earned dollars and find new and better ways to protect our property from pirates and thieves, such as most of the public.  Whether it's an overpriced, special-FX-heavy-yet-utterly-plotless movie from one of our studios, an insipidly empty, soulless, autotuned ballad from one of the RIAA's 'artists', a classic novel that one of our associate publishers has forever acquired the rights to, or a piece of $295.95 software that one of our customers would like to install on more than one of his household's computers without purchasing separate licenses for them all, at last, we can rest easy, knowing that our brave congresspeople will see to it that our potential profits are protected from those who would deny us every potential cent we feel we are owed.  And when you're buying that same music, or those same books, movies and television shows over...and over..and over..and over again, to enjoy it anew in formats yet undreamt of, we hope you too will appreciate the hard work that went into BOHICA.
"And one day soon, you will not only thoroughly enjoy the rape," Dodd finished, his grin widening as the yellow of his reptillian eyes glinted through his human contacts.  "You will come to beg us for it."

Lobbyists and attorneys representing Google, Facebook and Youtube are expected to appeal on the grounds that the hardware and software upgrades required for constant, round-the-clock monitoring of all internet users while online would require many hundreds of billions of dollars, possibly in excess of America's GDP.  A similar bill which would have allowed copyright holders to require their customers to install cameras and microphones in their bedrooms, living rooms and bathrooms for periodic monitoring at their own expense, was recently vetoed by President Obama, but is expected to be re-introduced early next year.
 
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