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(YouTube)   Apparently there's way more to building a road than just slathering some asphalt all over the ground   (youtube.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, asphalt, aerial shot, aliens  
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6085 clicks; posted to Video » on 25 Aug 2013 at 12:19 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



46 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-08-25 05:11:09 AM  
well, concrete roads anyway
 
2013-08-25 07:29:36 AM  
tl:dw
 
2013-08-25 10:15:24 AM  
The men moving the rebar weren't wearing hard hats in a construction area.  The bad thing about making a video or taking pictures of guys at work and posting them in public is that everybody can look at them and spot  violations.

Chime in CSPs, was this an OSHA violation?
 
2013-08-25 12:19:10 PM  
Here in Texas we're moving to using gravel. Much easier to handle than concrete or asphalt.
 
2013-08-25 12:34:03 PM  
I guess it doesn't really matter that the rebar is already rusting before it even goes in, since the road will be tore up in 10 or 15 years... or less if you have survey crews here in northern states like Michigan that like to drill "check holes" in the fall, which conveniently fill up with water, which freezes in winter, and causes... yup, the roads to crack and repairs are then required.

Also, does it have to be super smoothed out while still mostly wet? Why not wait until it's mostly dry and grind it smooth with a machine?
 
2013-08-25 12:43:14 PM  
LesserEvil:

Also, does it have to be super smoothed out while still mostly wet? Why not wait until it's mostly dry and grind it smooth with a machine?

I believe that has to do with the way it repels water. Really smooth won't let the water in.
 
2013-08-25 12:48:56 PM  
That was actually pretty interesting though it seems back breaking for the workers!  Most of the job seems to involving bending at the waist all day!
 
2013-08-25 12:57:20 PM  

colinspooky: well, concrete roads anyway


"best roads"

They've been laid like that for more than two decades up in Illinois... never met a pothole on one.  110% bad ass work.
 
2013-08-25 12:57:57 PM  

buntz: That was actually pretty interesting though it seems back breaking for the workers!  Most of the job seems to involving bending at the waist all day!


With very little load to carry.  This shiat is a dream job compared to taking over the farm for your dad.
 
2013-08-25 01:04:57 PM  

LesserEvil: I guess it doesn't really matter that the rebar is already rusting before it even goes in, since the road will be tore up in 10 or 15 years...


Yeah i was questioning the rusty rebar also and that the support chairs should not supposed to be in contact with the ground unless they are plastic or have rubber coated feet.

Metal chairs in direct contact with the subgrade allows corrosion to penetrate to the rebar in core of the slab.
 
2013-08-25 01:07:29 PM  

prjindigo: With very little load to carry.  This shiat is a dream job compared to taking over the farm for your dad.


I guess.  I'm just thinking of the constant bend, stand, bend, stand, bend, stand 10-14 hours a day.
 
2013-08-25 01:22:32 PM  

SauronWasFramed: The men moving the rebar weren't wearing hard hats in a construction area.  The bad thing about making a video or taking pictures of guys at work and posting them in public is that everybody can look at them and spot  violations.

Chime in CSPs, was this an OSHA violation?


Nor masks when the concrete dust was flying when the rebar holes were being drilled.
 
2013-08-25 02:04:49 PM  

SauronWasFramed: The men moving the rebar weren't wearing hard hats in a construction area.  The bad thing about making a video or taking pictures of guys at work and posting them in public is that everybody can look at them and spot  violations.

Chime in CSPs, was this an OSHA violation?


Hard hats are a supreme PITA when you're kneeling and working with your head down. They won't stay on. As long as you have it in hand, ready to put on when you stand up, it's generally OK, especially when there's no hazard beyond bird poop and raindrops. To keep them from falling off you can take the suspension web out and wear them backwards, which defeats the entire purpose of wearing them but if the OSHA guy is one of the gung-ho types it keeps him happy.
 
2013-08-25 02:30:01 PM  

crozzo: Hard hats are a supreme PITA when you're kneeling and working with your head down. They won't stay on. As long as you have it in hand, ready to put on when you stand up, it's generally OK, especially when there's no hazard beyond bird poop and raindrops. To keep them from falling off you can take the suspension web out and wear them backwards, which defeats the entire purpose of wearing them but if the OSHA guy is one of the gung-ho types it keeps him happy.


I work for a construction company doing a lot of work on the runways and taxiways, we specifically removed the requirement for hard hats from our safety program when working on the airfield. The reasoning was:
1) 99% of our work was being performed @ ground level or underground so no overhead hazards
2) with our close proximity (approx 75ft) to the edges of active taxiways and runways, there was a real danger of a hard hat falling off due to bending over and in high winds blowing into the path of an airplane.

My biggest problem out there isn't hard hats it getting the idiots to keep their dang safety glasses on.
 
2013-08-25 02:32:14 PM  
Fake

/Clearly the ratio of working worker to non-working worker is totally off
 
2013-08-25 02:58:34 PM  
from the  description at
YouTube: "Unlimited Access: I-57 Road Construction" by Aaron J. Jones - 39,257 views
Published on Aug 22, 2013
...
The project was shot on a Canon 5D Mark III. There are also a few aerial shots that a friend shot with a remote control multirotor helicopter.


You can see the drone at 1:09
 
2013-08-25 03:23:37 PM  

HairBolus: from the  description at
YouTube: "Unlimited Access: I-57 Road Construction" by Aaron J. Jones - 39,257 views
Published on Aug 22, 2013
...
The project was shot on a Canon 5D Mark III. There are also a few aerial shots that a friend shot with a remote control multirotor helicopter.

You can see the drone at 1:09


Good eye!
 
2013-08-25 03:29:11 PM  

LesserEvil: I guess it doesn't really matter that the rebar is already rusting before it even goes in, since the road will be tore up in 10 or 15 years... or less if you have survey crews here in northern states like Michigan that like to drill "check holes" in the fall, which conveniently fill up with water, which freezes in winter, and causes... yup, the roads to crack and repairs are then required.

Also, does it have to be super smoothed out while still mostly wet? Why not wait until it's mostly dry and grind it smooth with a machine?


The method in NY is to pave in the spring, during the fall they come back and dig out a 2ft strip every 50ft then repave it about 1/2 off in height. The 6 month old perfectly smooth road then becomes a bumpy mess.
 
2013-08-25 04:13:05 PM  
Some concrete roads that were poured badly(subgrade was spongy,,, or rebar was lacking like in the video) get covered over in asphalt to re-level the road(waves be gone). In some cases they put a couple of layers of asphalt to seal the road from winter salt and water.

/Anal retentive people want hardhats 24/7. They even masturbate while wearing a hardhat. So unless you have idiots above your head flinging their poo, quit getting your nickers in a knot over hardhats on a road project.

//An electrician got electrocuted on a job. The idiot workmans compensation inspector saw no violation leading to the electrocution, so he made a retarded fine based on the electrician not wearing a hardhat.(too lazy to find the link)
 
2013-08-25 04:53:35 PM  
Cool find, subby. The only thing I didn't see was them pouring test-cylinders of concrete every so often. They let the cylinders cure and take them back to the lab and compress them to make sure the concrete used was up to spec.
 
2013-08-25 04:57:17 PM  

sheep snorter: /Anal retentive people want hardhats 24/7. They even masturbate while wearing a hardhat. So unless you have idiots above your head flinging their poo, quit getting your nickers in a knot over hardhats on a road project.


If you are moving long lengths of rebar then people can get struck in the head, though safety glasses might better help to avoid the worst injuries.
 
2013-08-25 05:00:39 PM  
crystal-walton.com
 
2013-08-25 05:48:33 PM  

lucksi: Fake

/Clearly the ratio of working worker to non-working worker is totally off


"You say your entire crew forgot your shovels? Well, you're just gonna have to lean on each other."
 
2013-08-25 06:55:00 PM  

some_beer_drinker: tl:dw


Um, yeah, this. Six minutes?
 
2013-08-25 06:55:15 PM  
I still don't understand why every road project needs 25 guys, only 2 of whom are actually doing anything at any one time.
 
2013-08-25 07:04:56 PM  
Wait, where's the video footage of the guy making $30/hour to stand around and hole a stop sign?
 
2013-08-25 07:24:37 PM  
I call shenanigans. Every worker in that video was, well, working. If driving past highway construction zones has taught me anything, it's that for every one person working there has to be at least four watching.
 
2013-08-25 07:58:54 PM  

ReapTheChaos: I call shenanigans. Every worker in that video was, well, working. If driving past highway construction zones has taught me anything, it's that for every one person working there has to be at least four watching.


Private v. public sector.

We've just had an 8-week road project in our neighborhood.  Some of the work is being done by city crews and some is being done by a private contractor.  Guess which one had the higher proportion of guys standing around?
 
2013-08-25 09:11:53 PM  
That guy who's leaning over, squaring the edge of the concrete.  His back must hate him.
 
2013-08-25 10:09:55 PM  

buntz: That was actually pretty interesting though it seems back breaking for the workers!  Most of the job seems to involving bending at the waist all day!


The constant bending would kill my back for sure, but I was wondering about the guys who stood under the umbrellas operating those big slow-moving machines that didn't seem to be doing much. How do I get that job?
 
2013-08-25 10:50:40 PM  

Speaker2Animals: some_beer_drinker: tl:dw

Um, yeah, this. Six minutes?


Holy shiat. If you don't want to learn the steps of what goes into laying down a new concrete highway, don't watch the damn video then cry about how long it took, ya twits.
 
2013-08-25 10:56:42 PM  

Paradoxmaker: LesserEvil: I guess it doesn't really matter that the rebar is already rusting before it even goes in, since the road will be tore up in 10 or 15 years...

Yeah i was questioning the rusty rebar also and that the support chairs should not supposed to be in contact with the ground unless they are plastic or have rubber coated feet.

Metal chairs in direct contact with the subgrade allows corrosion to penetrate to the rebar in core of the slab.


A small layer of rust helps the rebar bond with the concrete.  Rust is fine as long as it's not significantly pitting the rebar

I didn't see subgrade below any rebar in the video (although I just skimmed it); it looks like the rebar is being put on top of some ground down concrete.  IF there's any rebar going down directly on aggregate base (it likely wouldn't be going down directly on subgrade), then I'm sure the inspector would notice if the chairs were bad when inspecting the rebar, either before it's placed or before the placement of concrete.
 
2013-08-25 10:57:31 PM  

LumberJack: Speaker2Animals: some_beer_drinker: tl:dw

Um, yeah, this. Six minutes?

Holy shiat. If you don't want to learn the steps of what goes into laying down a new concrete highway, don't watch the damn video then cry about how long it took, ya twits.


I didn't. Quit about 30 seconds in, as soon as I saw the length.
 
2013-08-25 10:59:11 PM  

Quaker: The constant bending would kill my back for sure, but I was wondering about the guys who stood under the umbrellas operating those big slow-moving machines that didn't seem to be doing much. How do I get that job?


I hear it's changed, but in my Dad's time, they rotated out the 'hold the sign' jobs. If you had the flu, pulled your back, you got rotated for a couple days until you could pull your weight again, or someone was sucking worse than you were heh.

I was hoping someone would post a link showing a comparison of different road construction methods. When I was stationed in Europe I saw a show that talked about the difference between EU vs. US road construction (why German roads were like glass while PA highways were crater pockmarked every year). - and how a large part of it came down to the difference in government/length of terms of office.

Hyperbole/bias aside, it basically said that US officials having a relatively short term of office, tend to try and hook up their buddies with contracts, thus gobs of money gets thrown their way, multiple highway projects get built, but then need almost immediate maintenance/repair/upkeep. The European method: they paid something like ten times more per mile of highway, due to the higher costs, could only do a few highway projects, but in the long run spent way less money as the maintenance/repair/upkeep was significantly less. It equated to better roads, but less cash hookups.

Short version of the conclusion: Europe: it was about the initial contract, US: companies would deliberately take a loss on the initial contract then pull up to the trough indefinitely.

/This was like 25 yrs. ago. Stuff has to have changed since, right? Right? :>/
 
2013-08-25 11:41:47 PM  

LumberJack: Speaker2Animals: some_beer_drinker: tl:dw

Um, yeah, this. Six minutes?

Holy shiat. If you don't want to learn the steps of what goes into laying down a new concrete highway, don't watch the damn video then cry about how long it took, ya twits.


I found it worth the time.
 
2013-08-26 08:47:15 AM  

prjindigo: colinspooky: well, concrete roads anyway

"best roads"

They've been laid like that for more than two decades up in Illinois... never met a pothole on one.  110% bad ass work.


I've never seen a pothole on a asphalt highway, but I have put up with the farking thumpbump thumpbump thumpbump thumpbump  for hours on shiatty concrete roads.

They're laid like that because of kickbacks from the concrete industry to local dikwads.
 
2013-08-26 09:36:34 AM  
A lot of people seem to be taking this video for granite.
 
2013-08-26 01:15:40 PM  
Not nearly enough people standing around doing nothing. They must have been shorthanded that day.
 
2013-08-26 01:37:58 PM  
Not in Hawaii Subby
 
2013-08-26 01:41:56 PM  

sheep snorter: //An electrician got electrocuted on a job. The idiot workmans compensation inspector saw no violation leading to the electrocution, so he made a retarded fine based on the electrician not wearing a hardhat.(too lazy to find the link)


Shocking
 
2013-08-26 01:43:21 PM  

Lt_Ryan: LesserEvil: I guess it doesn't really matter that the rebar is already rusting before it even goes in, since the road will be tore up in 10 or 15 years... or less if you have survey crews here in northern states like Michigan that like to drill "check holes" in the fall, which conveniently fill up with water, which freezes in winter, and causes... yup, the roads to crack and repairs are then required.

Also, does it have to be super smoothed out while still mostly wet? Why not wait until it's mostly dry and grind it smooth with a machine?

The method in NY is to pave in the spring, during the fall they come back and dig out a 2ft strip every 50ft then repave it about 1/2 off in height. The 6 month old perfectly smooth road then becomes a bumpy mess.


They do that here in Jersey as well. Keeps the councilman's cousin that owns the tire franchise in business.
 
2013-08-26 03:16:17 PM  

relaxitsjustme: Not in Hawaii Subby


I was stationed on Oahu from 1979 to 1982. When I got there, they were building a bridge in Wahiawa. They had been working on it for eight years before I got there. It looked the same when I left as when I got there. Have they finished yet?
 
2013-08-26 06:03:39 PM  

treecologist: I still don't understand why every road project needs 25 guys, only 2 of whom are actually doing anything at any one time.


you should hang out in the politics tab, then you'll understand how you're a farking sociopath arsehole teatard for even wondering.
 
2013-08-26 06:11:41 PM  

chasd00: treecologist: I still don't understand why every road project needs 25 guys, only 2 of whom are actually doing anything at any one time.

you should hang out in the politics tab, then you'll understand how you're a farking sociopath arsehole teatard for even wondering.


Wow... looks like he pissed in your cornflakes this morning.

He made a general observation that, in years past, seemed to hold true based on my own observations.

I think it's changed in recent years because state inspectors have clamped down. Here in Michigan, contractors also bid on how long a job takes, and pay the state "rent" when roads are closed longer than originally agreed to - this has cut back quite a bit on absentee contractors (outfits who prep an area, then leave for days or even weeks before returning to finish the job). In fact, it's so tight, pretty much every job I've seen runs through nights and weekends these days.

Go back 10 years though, and I've seen plenty of job sites with three guys working shovels or something, while 7 or 8 guys stand around drinking coffee. His observation, while hyperbole for comic effect, was not entirely unjustified.
 
2013-08-26 10:00:58 PM  

Tired_of_the_BS: Quaker: The constant bending would kill my back for sure, but I was wondering about the guys who stood under the umbrellas operating those big slow-moving machines that didn't seem to be doing much. How do I get that job?

I hear it's changed, but in my Dad's time, they rotated out the 'hold the sign' jobs. If you had the flu, pulled your back, you got rotated for a couple days until you could pull your weight again, or someone was sucking worse than you were heh.

I was hoping someone would post a link showing a comparison of different road construction methods. When I was stationed in Europe I saw a show that talked about the difference between EU vs. US road construction (why German roads were like glass while PA highways were crater pockmarked every year). - and how a large part of it came down to the difference in government/length of terms of office.

Hyperbole/bias aside, it basically said that US officials having a relatively short term of office, tend to try and hook up their buddies with contracts, thus gobs of money gets thrown their way, multiple highway projects get built, but then need almost immediate maintenance/repair/upkeep. The European method: they paid something like ten times more per mile of highway, due to the higher costs, could only do a few highway projects, but in the long run spent way less money as the maintenance/repair/upkeep was significantly less. It equated to better roads, but less cash hookups.

Short version of the conclusion: Europe: it was about the initial contract, US: companies would deliberately take a loss on the initial contract then pull up to the trough indefinitely.

/This was like 25 yrs. ago. Stuff has to have changed since, right? Right? :>/


Not in the USA.
 
2013-08-27 01:24:43 AM  

UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: relaxitsjustme: Not in Hawaii Subby

I was stationed on Oahu from 1979 to 1982. When I got there, they were building a bridge in Wahiawa. They had been working on it for eight years before I got there. It looked the same when I left as when I got there. Have they finished yet?


Not sure which bridge you're talking about but one of the bridges in Wahiawa went through about 2 months of single lane closures not too long ago as they did emergency repairs to keep the thing from falling down.
 
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