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(The New York Times)   Florida is running out of sand EVERYBODY PANIC   (nytimes.com) divider line 52
    More: Florida, foreign exchange reserves, South Florida, Miami-Dade  
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5976 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Aug 2013 at 8:44 PM (33 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-24 07:15:58 PM
Typical NY Times article.  They only care about the chunk in SE Florida that the people from Joisy and Lawn Gisland go to.
 
2013-08-24 08:31:38 PM
Newsflash: Coastlines are fluid and constantly changing. Deal with it. Film at eleven.

Outer Cape Cod is also disappearing. (Except Race Point, which is growing.) It's not pretending it can stop nature by scattering around some ground up glass, though. It's sucking it up and moving back from the edge.

I did have to laugh at the poor guy trying desperately to sell his beautiful beach house that was about two good Nor'Easters away from a watery grave. Meh, what do I know, maybe some idiot will buy it.
 
2013-08-24 08:50:03 PM
If we ever stop buying oil from the middle east they'll just start selling us their sand.
 
2013-08-24 08:53:54 PM
Since pretty much the whole state is made of sand, this can't possibly be true
 
2013-08-24 08:57:20 PM
blah blah vag blah, blah
 
2013-08-24 08:57:37 PM

Disgruntled Goat: Since pretty much the whole state is made of sand, this can't possibly be true


You're thinking of Nevada.
 
2013-08-24 09:02:32 PM
Well I guess it's back to pounding rocks for silicates. *sigh*
 
2013-08-24 09:05:30 PM
Ocean tides are so mysterious.
 
2013-08-24 09:09:03 PM
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-08-24 09:11:30 PM
I love it when dumbass tourists from Nyawk come down and rave about how great our sand is. Yeah, it's cause we import it, dipshiats. This beach has been artificial since the 70's. You might has well be at a theme park.

PS buy some more overpriced trinkets on your way back home, k plz thnx
 
2013-08-24 09:15:36 PM
I guess it's time to...

SAND YOUR GROUND
themodernmage.com
 
2013-08-24 09:15:55 PM
addictedtoradio.com
 
2013-08-24 09:19:45 PM
Long guy land with palm trees.

/It's stupid to live beside the ocean.
 
2013-08-24 09:19:45 PM

namegoeshere: Newsflash: Coastlines are fluid and constantly changing. Deal with it. Film at eleven.


Exploit people's ignorance. Convince them their behavior is the cause, then cash in on the guilt. Get with the program already.
 
2013-08-24 09:22:44 PM
After all the "sand in your vagina" jibs I have witnessed here surely the resourceful and cavernous can charitably contribute to this woeful cause.
 
2013-08-24 09:31:03 PM

namegoeshere: Newsflash: Coastlines are fluid and constantly changing. Deal with it. Film at eleven.


THE SAND MUST FLOW!!
 
2013-08-24 09:34:35 PM
But we EAT SAND.

videos.videopress.com
 
2013-08-24 09:38:01 PM
I have 200 pounds of it in he the shed for use during the winter, but I'm willing to sell to the highest bidder.
 
2013-08-24 09:41:20 PM

ifky: I have 200 pounds of it in he the shed for use during the winter, but I'm willing to sell to the highest bidder.


How many women have you kidnapped to have 200 pounds of sand in your shed?!
 
2013-08-24 09:42:23 PM
Well, that's one complaint I never thought I'd hear about.

Then again, Florida is becoming a glorified mess and it's already an ecological disaster area. A lot of ecologists, oceanographers and geologists have, over the years, warned coastal cities about over development along the beaches and pointed out exactly what would happen. They were ignored and what they said would happen, has happened.

Now, they get to spend billions in tax money to try and clean up or control the mess.

There's a sand ridge in the center of the state, which, some time back, scientists discovered to be a primary source of fresh water, acting like a catch and filter from the frequent rain storms, which then disperses it into the underground aquifer. Of course, it seems assorted businesses have opened on it, selling sand for fill, cement and other stuff. The local government has been ordering them off for some time now, but they've been fighting it.

It seems making money is more important than having an adequate supply of fresh drinking water.

Vero Beach spent almost 11 million on sand to 're-nourish' it's beaches and the company doing it suddenly 'renegotiated' it's contract around halfway through, tagging on another 4 or 5 million.

I found that a bit interesting.

After Katrina and Jeanine, people poured out of the state and I cheered them on, but within two years, the flow reversed and they started pouring back. Florida is the lightening capitol of the US and right in the middle of Hurricane Row.

The situation kind of reminds me of these places where people densely inhabit the sides of an active volcano, knowing that it's going to eventually erupt.
 
2013-08-24 09:43:26 PM

FrancoFile: Typical NY Times article.  They only care about the chunk in SE Florida that the people from Joisy and Lawn Gisland go to.


That's because the rest of Florida tends to have plenty of easily dredgable (is that a word?) sand. Hell, my small, semi-rural county dredges new sand every 3-5 years. Funds, though, tend to be variable.
 
2013-08-24 09:44:05 PM

Maggie_Luna: ifky: I have 200 pounds of it in he the shed for use during the winter, but I'm willing to sell to the highest bidder.

How many women have you kidnapped to have 200 pounds of sand in your shed?!


Don't know! You would think Home Depot would list that on the damn bags!
 
2013-08-24 09:48:39 PM
This will certainly make Bugs Bunny's job a little easier.
 
2013-08-24 09:48:44 PM
Great. I guess this means we'll be invading Iraq again.
 
2013-08-24 09:52:57 PM
FTFA: The situation is so dire that two counties to the north - St. Lucie and Martin - are being asked to donate their own offshore sand in the spirit of neighborliness.

Sand has value. Let those needy counties exhaust their resources before you SELL them sand. Or don't let 'em have sand at any price. It's their sand.

This reminds me of the Peripheral Canal that the California government attempted to build to provide water to Southern California so they could sell it cheap to the oil companies so they could raise cotton on their vast desert properties, without providing recompense to Northern Californians who would have provided the valuable resource.

They tried to claim that it was for Los Angeles, but household water usage consumes only 15% of the water now provided. The remainder the government sells to large lot water buyers at pennies on the dollar. Fark 'em.
 
2013-08-24 10:01:28 PM

berylman: After all the "sand in your vagina" jibs I have witnessed here surely the resourceful and cavernous can charitably contribute to this woeful cause.


As long as there's at least one vagina left in the world, sand is a renewable resource.  No?
 
2013-08-24 10:11:04 PM
And the Sand Wars started thusly.
 
2013-08-24 10:16:30 PM

Rik01: Well, that's one complaint I never thought I'd hear about.

Then again, Florida is becoming a glorified mess and it's already an ecological disaster area. A lot of ecologists, oceanographers and geologists have, over the years, warned coastal cities about over development along the beaches and pointed out exactly what would happen. They were ignored and what they said would happen, has happened.

Now, they get to spend billions in tax money to try and clean up or control the mess.

There's a sand ridge in the center of the state, which, some time back, scientists discovered to be a primary source of fresh water, acting like a catch and filter from the frequent rain storms, which then disperses it into the underground aquifer. Of course, it seems assorted businesses have opened on it, selling sand for fill, cement and other stuff. The local government has been ordering them off for some time now, but they've been fighting it.

It seems making money is more important than having an adequate supply of fresh drinking water.

Vero Beach spent almost 11 million on sand to 're-nourish' it's beaches and the company doing it suddenly 'renegotiated' it's contract around halfway through, tagging on another 4 or 5 million.

I found that a bit interesting.

After Katrina and Jeanine, people poured out of the state and I cheered them on, but within two years, the flow reversed and they started pouring back. Florida is the lightening capitol of the US and right in the middle of Hurricane Row.

The situation kind of reminds me of these places where people densely inhabit the sides of an active volcano, knowing that it's going to eventually erupt.


Well if you don't sell the sand to make money now, what are you going to use to buy bottled water? Someone obviously didn't go to job creator school.
 
2013-08-24 10:31:27 PM
Considering that so many Floridians currently have their heads in the sand, is this such a bad thing?

The question is, how much longer can they go before they realize they can't win?
 
2013-08-24 10:54:51 PM
Bugsbunny.jpg
 
2013-08-24 10:57:40 PM
Under United States law, the Army Corps must show that domestic sand is not available for economic or environmental reasons before it can use foreign sand.

i.imgur.com

They're tirrrkken errrr JERRRBBSS!!
 
2013-08-24 11:05:03 PM

namegoeshere: Newsflash: Coastlines are fluid and constantly changing. Deal with it. Film at eleven.

Outer Cape Cod is also disappearing. (Except Race Point, which is growing.) It's not pretending it can stop nature by scattering around some ground up glass, though. It's sucking it up and moving back from the edge.

I did have to laugh at the poor guy trying desperately to sell his beautiful beach house that was about two good Nor'Easters away from a watery grave. Meh, what do I know, maybe some idiot will buy it.


I came to post almost exactly this in almost exactly these words.
 
2013-08-24 11:10:49 PM
Uh, sand dunes? Quit building stuff on the beach? Florida I love you but you gotta get your head out of your ass with these ecological issues.
 
2013-08-24 11:15:22 PM
Sand is precious.

m2.ttxm.co.uk
 
2013-08-24 11:20:29 PM
www.jimjambo.com
 
2013-08-24 11:22:42 PM
Was there a nice sandy beach there in the 1920s?  No?  Then chances are mother nature's rules say there isn't going to be a beach there without dumping in loads of sand.
 
2013-08-24 11:44:55 PM
Cape May laughs at your silly erosion issues

farm3.staticflickr.com
 
2013-08-24 11:51:38 PM

FrancoFile: Typical NY Times article.  They only care about the chunk in SE Florida that the people from Joisy and Lawn Gisland go to.


Imagine that.

All news, like all politics, is local. Get over it.
 
2013-08-25 12:22:50 AM
Well what do you know?  To think that everyone laughed at me when I took Sandbox 101 in college.
 
2013-08-25 12:36:24 AM
Call the state GOP.. those farkers have vast amounts of it to spare.

/in their vaginas
 
2013-08-25 12:40:02 AM
I've only visited for one week, but never saw a "huge" crowd like that on the south part of Haulover.
 
2013-08-25 01:52:12 AM
 
2013-08-25 02:20:33 AM
theemighteekittens.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-08-25 03:06:20 AM

UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: FTFA: The situation is so dire that two counties to the north - St. Lucie and Martin - are being asked to donate their own offshore sand in the spirit of neighborliness.

Sand has value. Let those needy counties exhaust their resources before you SELL them sand. Or don't let 'em have sand at any price. It's their sand.

This reminds me of the Peripheral Canal that the California government attempted to build to provide water to Southern California so they could sell it cheap to the oil companies so they could raise cotton on their vast desert properties, without providing recompense to Northern Californians who would have provided the valuable resource.

They tried to claim that it was for Los Angeles, but household water usage consumes only 15% of the water now provided. The remainder the government sells to large lot water buyers at pennies on the dollar. Fark 'em.


Funny thing about that, the natural shoreline current - as well as the sand flow, is southern.  The Gulf Stream is *miles* off the coast and its own entity.  The real problem is that Brevard County, north of them, set up a sea wall on the north side of Port Canaveral years ago to keep the locks and shipping passage from getting silted in.  It used to be really important for NASA to keep the Orbiters (Space Shuttles) flying, but it got the eyeball of alot of cruise terminal operators.  Between Carnival, Disney, and the transshipment barge/train traffic, there are major localized economic reasons to keep the port open.  That sea wall, and the dredging going on to keep a deep harbor open, is directly responsible for the lack of natural beach replenishment south of there because "the spice *can't* flow".
 
2013-08-25 03:33:34 AM

DON.MAC: Was there a nice sandy beach there in the 1920s?  No?  Then chances are mother nature's rules say there isn't going to be a beach there without dumping in loads of sand.


Sea walls are a big factor.  Put up sea walls to protect your buildings, and the beach tends to vanish.

No so much mother nature, but physics
 
2013-08-25 05:20:12 AM
Let not the sands of time get in your lunch.
 
2013-08-25 05:53:38 AM
Nancy Grace has been shoving it all in her vag.
 
2013-08-25 06:50:48 AM
Oh noes! Where did all of our sands go? I guess into the wild blue yonder.....

By the way, I have too much sand in my backyard if any southern FL county wants to start the bidding. It seems that the sand keeps overtaking my grass every month back there! (I figured it was just worthless.)

And, What is this FTA...."In a state where the lure of pristine beaches is pivotal to a robust economy, hoarding sand is not unlike stocking the basement with toilet paper, water and peanut butter."

Obviously, this NYT writer and editors never have been to Florida before, because we generally do not have any basements in our homes. Too much sand and a low water table.....ironic, no?
 
2013-08-25 09:17:16 AM
Come to my front yard, there's enough for about 20 miles of beaches. Please replace with dirt (something mostly unknown here in Florida)
 
2013-08-25 09:59:26 AM
Go on up to Port Fierce
'giner
 
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