Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Daily Mail)   Not news: Woman bakes cakes for patients at hospice. News: For the last 26 years. Fark: She is told to stop for safety reasons despite never receiving a complaint   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 66
    More: Asinine, Maggie Molyneux, hospices, kitchen staff, safety reasons, Welwyn Garden City  
•       •       •

6237 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Aug 2013 at 8:22 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



66 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-08-24 05:16:52 AM  
Well, yeah. You wouldn't want to damage the health of terminally ill patients
 
2013-08-24 08:28:05 AM  
Just because they are dying to get it there doesn't mean you get to kill 'em.
 
2013-08-24 08:29:34 AM  
Give the cakes to some one else that appeciates them.  screw those guys.
 
2013-08-24 08:29:36 AM  
You can't make it up, it's political correctness gone mad
 
2013-08-24 08:30:38 AM  
Sorry subby, rules are rules, and medical facilities have really strict ones.

/And no, it's not Obama's "Big Government" run amok
 
2013-08-24 08:32:04 AM  

Peter Griffin:

Oh my god, who the hell cares?


But seriously, but because it has never happened, doesn't mean the hospice should take the legal risk that it does.

No sympathy, find better shiat to do. Like Crochet?
 
2013-08-24 08:32:27 AM  

Mikey1969: Sorry subby, rules are rules, and medical facilities have really strict ones.

/And no, it's not Obama's "Big Government" run amok


No, it's an out-of-control legal system run by it's own inmates/lawyers.
 
2013-08-24 08:33:54 AM  
I will reserve my outrage until I see a reliable source, lol.
 
2013-08-24 08:35:26 AM  
The article fails to mention how many cats she owns.
 
2013-08-24 08:39:03 AM  
All part of the sterilization and homogenization of life in 'merica. Paint this place one solid, massive shade of gray.
 
2013-08-24 08:41:10 AM  
It's a hospice. The whole idea is to make their last days comfortable. One suggestion would be to ban ingredients that have a significant risk of food poisoning, such as cream and give a list of ingredients that are relatively safe.
 
2013-08-24 08:41:28 AM  

colinspooky: Well, yeah. You wouldn't want to damage the health of terminally ill patients


FTFA comment section:

The latest clampdown has been ordered by Helen Dodd, director of the charity, in a bid to eliminate health risks to patients.................................My Dear, you are working in a Hospice where the clientele are terminally ill. How much more harm will they possibly suffer from a home made cake?
- the phoenix, Brandesburton England
 
2013-08-24 08:42:03 AM  
Big brother? Check
Righteous Indignation? Check
Photo of glum looking people? Check
Emphasized word in all caps in headline? Check
Ignoring or minimizing pertinent facts? Check

The Daily Mail really has the whole "make the sheep go baaa" thing down pat. Hats off to them.

I've been in old folk's homes before. All the old people just sit around waiting to die. If there's any interest in food, it's the Jello they get on Wednesdays.
 
2013-08-24 08:42:39 AM  

Mikey1969: Sorry subby, rules are rules, and medical facilities have really strict ones.

/And no, it's not Obama's "Big Government" run amok


Nobody even mentioned Obama. Besides it's the UK.
 
2013-08-24 08:42:43 AM  

LewDux: You can't make it up, it's political correctness gone mad


What does political correctness have to do with this? This is a stupid move but I'd love to know how you think this is political correctness at work.
 
2013-08-24 08:44:01 AM  
I was going to say "just because no one would complain about cake doesn't mean the cake is safe, I have cases of food poisoning that attest to this" but I see that's already been covered.

So instead I'm going to point out that getting a food handler's permit (what's required to make food legally for donation purposes) in the US is about thirty bucks and a two-hour course where the test is basically to make sure you can wash dishes and know what temperatures and durations sterilize things.  If the woman in TFA isn't just shrugging and getting the UK equivalent, she should be put in the hospice herself, because she's so farking lazy it's probably terminal.
 
2013-08-24 08:45:54 AM  
the longer they live
and the less they move
the more money they generate

(you really dont want them to die after they've gotten ripe)
$
 
2013-08-24 08:46:03 AM  

FTFA:

we are caring for people who may have a suppressed immune system or other complications caused by their illness
A volunteer baker is unlikely to take individual needs into account. I get that these patients are already dying, but there are ways to make the road to that death more unpleasant. This decision reduces that risk.
I also get that this baker has received no complaints over decades of cake baking. But "no complaints" does not mean "no problems".
 
2013-08-24 08:48:19 AM  
First they wouldn't let me hand out cakes to the children at the local elementary school playground and now this?! What has the world come to?

But seriously, Lady, get over yourself. The medical facility is liable for anything that might happen if they feed someone, for instance, something to which they're allergic. Just because they are hospice patients doesn't mean families won't sue if the hospital kills them through negligence.  The hospice patients will still get cake and you can give yours to homeless people or something.
 
2013-08-24 08:50:13 AM  

Mikey1969: Sorry subby, rules are rules, and medical facilities have really strict ones.


Which I'm sure they apply just as strictly to their own employees. Especially the overnight staff. They spare no expense to hire top-shelf people for that gig, I'm sure.

Try visiting a hospice or a nursing home at an off hour when the shiny happy people they hire for daytime work aren't there. (shudder)

Oh, and for anybody getting all butthurt about the Daily Mail, here it is from the Telegraph.
 
2013-08-24 08:51:43 AM  
Of course, in reality the cakes for the terminally ill patients will not end up being made by hospital staff.  They will simply stop being provided.
 
2013-08-24 08:55:04 AM  
Are the kitchen staff union? That could explain it.
 
2013-08-24 08:59:06 AM  
That's kind of a nasty looking cake. Couldn't they have gotten something like this?

thechive.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-08-24 08:59:10 AM  
I love the fact that the hospice still says you can sell at bake sales so you can donate the money to the charity.

I'd say "screw you"
 
2013-08-24 08:59:40 AM  

Gulper Eel: Mikey1969: Sorry subby, rules are rules, and medical facilities have really strict ones.

Which I'm sure they apply just as strictly to their own employees. Especially the overnight staff. They spare no expense to hire top-shelf people for that gig, I'm sure.

Try visiting a hospice or a nursing home at an off hour when the shiny happy people they hire for daytime work aren't there. (shudder)

Oh, and for anybody getting all butthurt about the Daily Mail, here it is from the Telegraph.


The use a bunch of the same quotes and the same photograph of the couple. The article is edited, not authored, by the person on the byline. That means this was handed to the telegraph, who appeal to much of the same readership as the Daily Mail, and used to fill inches. If anything this makes me more inclined to believe this is basic pandering to the suburban pitchfork holder. If it shows up in the Independent, that would be another matter.
 
2013-08-24 09:06:12 AM  
3.bp.blogspot.com

maybe the patients would like a perfect slice of cake.
 
2013-08-24 09:08:45 AM  
Rules are rules, and this thread will out the farkers in love with rules.
 
2013-08-24 09:20:50 AM  
She wasn't forced to stop for safety reasons, she was forced to stop for lawyer reasons.
 
2013-08-24 09:22:32 AM  

boozel: but because it has never happened, doesn't mean the hospice should take the legal risk that it does.


More establishments should ban stuff because of things that have never happened so they don't have that legal risk.
 
2013-08-24 09:26:01 AM  

Nick Nostril: All part of the sterilization and homogenization of life in 'merica. Paint this place one solid, massive shade of gray.


Except the small fact that it's England.
 
2013-08-24 09:28:41 AM  
I's not a cake until it's frosted.
 
2013-08-24 09:30:27 AM  
Daily Fail headline plus Farkb sensationalism.How much are you willing to bet that none of it ever happened?
 
2013-08-24 09:39:48 AM  

Jim_Callahan: I was going to say "just because no one would complain about cake doesn't mean the cake is safe, I have cases of food poisoning that attest to this" but I see that's already been covered.

So instead I'm going to point out that getting a food handler's permit (what's required to make food legally for donation purposes) in the US is about thirty bucks and a two-hour course where the test is basically to make sure you can wash dishes and know what temperatures and durations sterilize things.  If the woman in TFA isn't just shrugging and getting the UK equivalent, she should be put in the hospice herself, because she's so farking lazy it's probably terminal.


So I was in danger at all the community pot-luck dinners my parents used to take me too?
 
2013-08-24 09:40:35 AM  
Except the article says 23 years, Subby.
 
2013-08-24 09:41:14 AM  
Safety reasons in hospice? What? They worried someone might die?
 
2013-08-24 09:45:18 AM  

GanjSmokr: boozel: but because it has never happened, doesn't mean the hospice should take the legal risk that it does.

More establishments should ban stuff because of things that have never happened so they don't have that legal risk.


[ass]
because a thing has not yet happened, does not mean it can not.
[/ass]

But holy shiat, these are TERMINAL patients, at a hospice (a place designed to be more comfortable and less 'sterile' than a hospital.)  I'm sure many that close to the end can't taste the difference between a home made cake and piece of cardboard. That's no reason to feed them the much safer cardboard.
 
2013-08-24 09:45:23 AM  
I once brought a bottled beer to Dad in a hospice -- he had asked for it -- after checking with the director. She asked me to be discreet. Main thing I remember is Dad not liking it that much. His mind was already going by then and perhaps his sense of taste was, too.

BTW, I'm 100% with the hospice in TFA. I tried donating a crapload of Ensure that Dad no longer needed and the hospice wouldn't take it, citing the need to control everything their patients got.
 
2013-08-24 09:50:32 AM  

Wrong Trousers: It's a hospice. The whole idea is to make their last days comfortable. One suggestion would be to ban ingredients that have a significant risk of food poisoning, such as cream and give a list of ingredients that are relatively safe.


Or let them enjoy some delicious homemade cake. Farking morons.
 
2013-08-24 09:57:46 AM  

Radak: Nick Nostril: All part of the sterilization and homogenization of life in 'merica. Paint this place one solid, massive shade of gray.

Except the small fact that it's England.


Sadly, there is very little difference.
 
2013-08-24 10:02:32 AM  

r1niceboy: The use a bunch of the same quotes and the same photograph of the couple. The article is edited, not authored, by the person on the byline.


Is any of either article factually incorrect?

Anyway, here's another local paper's take. And another. The facts do not seem to be in dispute.

Sorry it wasn't worthy of the independent or the precious Guardian.

To re-emphasize, if a hospice or long-term care patient picks up an infection the odds are far greater that they'll catch it from something inside the facility or somebody working at the facility in some kind of medical capacity.

They're not going to catch a urinary-tract infection or MRSA from a cake - as the zero-complaint figure indicates.
 
2013-08-24 10:04:06 AM  

r1niceboy: Gulper Eel: Mikey1969: Sorry subby, rules are rules, and medical facilities have really strict ones.

Which I'm sure they apply just as strictly to their own employees. Especially the overnight staff. They spare no expense to hire top-shelf people for that gig, I'm sure.

Try visiting a hospice or a nursing home at an off hour when the shiny happy people they hire for daytime work aren't there. (shudder)

Oh, and for anybody getting all butthurt about the Daily Mail, here it is from the Telegraph.

The use a bunch of the same quotes and the same photograph of the couple. The article is edited, not authored, by the person on the byline. That means this was handed to the telegraph, who appeal to much of the same readership as the Daily Mail, and used to fill inches. If anything this makes me more inclined to believe this is basic pandering to the suburban pitchfork holder. If it shows up in the Independent, that would be another matter.


After The Independent's hack job with Snowden and the leaked intel, I'm not sure I'll trust them, either.
 
2013-08-24 10:18:25 AM  
Yeah, it's pants on head dumb, but from a liability standpoint, the clinic has to do a CYA moment. If a resident died from a food allergy from the treats, their family could turn around and sue the living shiat out of them.

Blame the retarded overworked tort system for frivolous lawsuits that cause crap like this.
 
2013-08-24 10:20:55 AM  

Gulper Eel: r1niceboy: The use a bunch of the same quotes and the same photograph of the couple. The article is edited, not authored, by the person on the byline.

Is any of either article factually incorrect?

Anyway, here's another local paper's take. And another. The facts do not seem to be in dispute.

Sorry it wasn't worthy of the independent or the precious Guardian.

To re-emphasize, if a hospice or long-term care patient picks up an infection the odds are far greater that they'll catch it from something inside the facility or somebody working at the facility in some kind of medical capacity.

They're not going to catch a urinary-tract infection or MRSA from a cake - as the zero-complaint figure indicates.


The Welwyn Hatfield paper uses the same quotes and picture, so likely the same journalist. The Herts and Essex Observer report is a response to the sensationalism, and is actually a well written piece that will likely be ignored. My point is that the Journalist's piece uses certain tabloid sensationalist motifs. The readers of these papers, and Farkers, are like Pavlov's dog. The bell is rung, and they eat a small meringue.
 
2013-08-24 10:48:19 AM  

Bill Evans at Mariposa: A volunteer baker is unlikely to take individual needs into account. I get that these patients are already dying, but there are ways to make the road to that death more unpleasant. This decision reduces that risk.
I also get that this baker has received no complaints over decades of cake baking. But "no complaints" does not mean "no problems".


As opposed to the responsiveness to individual circumstance typically shown by government-run service industries staffed by union employees, you mean?
 
2013-08-24 10:54:43 AM  

colinspooky: Well, yeah. You wouldn't want to damage the health of terminally ill patients


Right, what's the worst that could happen?
 
2013-08-24 11:00:55 AM  
Did the hospice get a new head nurse?

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-08-24 11:08:05 AM  
You're dead to me England.  Enjoy your destruction
 
2013-08-24 11:09:29 AM  
Tales from the Crypt (1972) .

Blind Alleys (Tales from the Crypt #46, February-March 1955)
Major William Rogers (Nigel Patrick), the new director of a home for the blind (making up mostly of elderly and middle-aged men), makes drastic financial cuts, reducing heat and rationing food for the residents, while he lives in luxury with Shane, his Belgian Malinois. When he ignores complaints and a man dies due to the cold, the blind residents, led by the stone-faced George Carter (Patrick Magee) exact an equally cruel revenge. After Carter and his group subdue the staff, they lure and trap Major Rogers as well as his dog in two separate rooms in the basement. The blind men then begin constructing in the basement a maze of narrow corridors, some of them lined with razor blades. They starve the Major's dog, then place the Major in the maze's center, release the dog and turn off the basement lights...
 
2013-08-24 11:13:22 AM  
www.demotivationalposters.org
 
2013-08-24 11:15:12 AM  
I've been in thousands of homes and their kitchens.  Trust me when I tell you that not every kitchen has stoves and counter tops clean enough for you to eat on.  I've been in some pretty disgusting kitchens.

I'm not saying this lady's kitchen was a filthy roach infested bacteria factory, some of the other volunteer's homes aren't.

(same goes for those family reunions and bring your own dish get-togethers you love to attend.  Let that thought rummage through your head next time you put a big scoop of potato salad on your plate.)
 
Displayed 50 of 66 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report