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(The Raw Story)   Study conducted by the No shiat, Sherlock Institute finds that Congress is more receptive to the plight of rich people   (rawstory.com) divider line 6
    More: Obvious, 111th Congress, U.S. Senate  
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978 clicks; posted to Politics » on 22 Aug 2013 at 5:47 PM (46 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-22 06:00:26 PM
4 votes:

Car_Ramrod: Well, by having the most money, they have the most speech. Therefore, their issues are more prominent as their speech outnumbers those with less speech. As it is Congress' job to listen to the most important issues to their constituents, they should be representing the issues affecting those with money.

Logic.


I respectfully disagree. While it is clear that the rich do have the most (and the most important) speech, the key to understanding Congress' support of the rich is their role in society as the job creators. Many Americans possess skills, trades, and the ability to manufacture the great products we all enjoy, but they lack the most crucial and rarest ability of all- the ability to create jobs. This is what made the rich rich in the first place, and they are the lynchpin that holds our fragile society and economy together.
2013-08-22 06:09:44 PM
3 votes:

UrukHaiGuyz: Car_Ramrod: Well, by having the most money, they have the most speech. Therefore, their issues are more prominent as their speech outnumbers those with less speech. As it is Congress' job to listen to the most important issues to their constituents, they should be representing the issues affecting those with money.

Logic.

I respectfully disagree. While it is clear that the rich do have the most (and the most important) speech, the key to understanding Congress' support of the rich is their role in society as the job creators. Many Americans possess skills, trades, and the ability to manufacture the great products we all enjoy, but they lack the most crucial and rarest ability of all- the ability to create jobs. This is what made the rich rich in the first place, and they are the lynchpin that holds our fragile society and economy together.


They should do something similar to a midichlorian count* so we can tell from an early age who the most able job creaters are. I assume it can be done by the Chamber of Commerce and/or The Business Council.

*I know I know shut up
2013-08-22 07:15:15 PM
2 votes:

Car_Ramrod: UrukHaiGuyz: Car_Ramrod: Well, by having the most money, they have the most speech. Therefore, their issues are more prominent as their speech outnumbers those with less speech. As it is Congress' job to listen to the most important issues to their constituents, they should be representing the issues affecting those with money.

Logic.

I respectfully disagree. While it is clear that the rich do have the most (and the most important) speech, the key to understanding Congress' support of the rich is their role in society as the job creators. Many Americans possess skills, trades, and the ability to manufacture the great products we all enjoy, but they lack the most crucial and rarest ability of all- the ability to create jobs. This is what made the rich rich in the first place, and they are the lynchpin that holds our fragile society and economy together.

They should do something similar to a midichlorian count* so we can tell from an early age who the most able job creaters are. I assume it can be done by the Chamber of Commerce and/or The Business Council.

*I know I know shut up


Got that for ya:

hypehumor.com
2013-08-22 05:50:08 PM
2 votes:
Well, by having the most money, they have the most speech. Therefore, their issues are more prominent as their speech outnumbers those with less speech. As it is Congress' job to listen to the most important issues to their constituents, they should be representing the issues affecting those with money.

Logic.
2013-08-22 06:23:42 PM
1 votes:
www.screeninsults.com
2013-08-22 06:20:27 PM
1 votes:

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: Selector: Someone's sarcasmometer is broken. Also, it's linchpin.

I do love a fellow spelling and grammar Nazi, but it turns out "lynchpin" is an acceptable spelling.

/f*ck this crazy language


Wooooo! Technically correct. To be honest, I gambled and skipped the Google search even though I was a bit iffy.

/likes to live dangerously
 
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