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(International Business Times)   Powerful solar storm flare with superheated particles is currently surging toward Earth, but don't woɍɌy, y0u prŏþab1y woN't n0ti(e aNyƮh|nġ d\ffƏ®enŧ[%   (ibtimes.com) divider line 95
    More: Interesting, Earth, magnetic fields, particles, CMEs, magnetosphere, Geomagnetic Storm, space weathers, stereos  
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7351 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Aug 2013 at 8:52 AM (46 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-22 08:07:34 AM
As opposed to the Solar Storms with ice cubes and liquid helium?
 
2013-08-22 08:21:05 AM
Any chance of getting northern lights at 40°N?  Only saw them here once in my life, very subtle but awesome to have seen.
 
2013-08-22 08:28:52 AM

nekom: Any chance of getting northern lights at 40°N?  Only saw them here once in my life, very subtle but awesome to have seen.


That would be cool
 
2013-08-22 08:53:55 AM
If the sun keeps doing that, it'll go blind.
 
2013-08-22 08:55:03 AM
Someone open up that time capsule and get out the page of numbers

/that better not be obscure
 
2013-08-22 08:56:11 AM

Weaver95: If the sun keeps doing that, it'll go blind.


I think your blindness and hairy palms are from something else....
 
d23 [TotalFark]
2013-08-22 08:56:17 AM
encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com
 
2013-08-22 08:59:13 AM
doesn't this happen, like, all the farking time??
 
2013-08-22 08:59:58 AM
I'll be keeping an eye on SpaceWeather.com, and an ear to 50.090 MHz for some of that nice, raspy auroral propagation.

As of right now, the planetary K index is a 2.
 
2013-08-22 09:00:14 AM
previously-on-lost.com
 
2013-08-22 09:00:28 AM

Weaver95: If the sun keeps doing that, it'll go blind.


It's just a phase.
 
2013-08-22 09:00:31 AM
Thank goodness for pollution in our atmosphere to save us.
 
2013-08-22 09:02:33 AM

doglover: As opposed to the Solar Storms with ice cubes and liquid helium?


Solar Storm would be a good name for a shot or a drink.

/hold the liquid helium, please
 
2013-08-22 09:02:41 AM

dittybopper: I'll be keeping an eye on SpaceWeather.com, and an ear to 50.090 MHz for some of that nice, raspy auroral propagation.

As of right now, the planetary K index is a 2.


I have no idea what you are talking about, but I am intrigued. Links?
 
2013-08-22 09:03:26 AM
we'll be alright

fc05.deviantart.net

superman will save us
 
2013-08-22 09:05:19 AM
Hmmm... I couldn't get a greenlight when the planetary Kp was 6 for 4 hours... but this little whisper gets one?


/its the random monthly space weather greenlight.
 
2013-08-22 09:05:29 AM

dittybopper: I'll be keeping an eye on SpaceWeather.com, and an ear to 50.090 MHz for some of that nice, raspy auroral propagation.

As of right now, the planetary K index is a 2.


They're only expecting a K4.  This isn't even worth paying attention to, unless you run a power distribution network in the arctic or operate satellites.  Even then, it's probably just another day at the office.
 
2013-08-22 09:06:12 AM
On the whole, I prefer my news of a solar apocalypse from the Paris Business Journal.
img1.fark.net
blatherwatch.blogs.com
 
2013-08-22 09:06:34 AM

usttsdw: dittybopper: I'll be keeping an eye on SpaceWeather.com, and an ear to 50.090 MHz for some of that nice, raspy auroral propagation.

As of right now, the planetary K index is a 2.

I have no idea what you are talking about, but I am intrigued. Links?



http://www.n0hr.com/radio_propagation.htm
 
2013-08-22 09:08:35 AM
Where was the kaboom?
There was supposed to be an earth shattering kaboom.
 
2013-08-22 09:09:02 AM

IdBeCrazyIf: Someone open up that time capsule and get out the page of numbers

/that better not be obscure


I don't watch crummy Nic Cage movies, no matter how much Ebert bragged on them. 0
 
2013-08-22 09:10:37 AM
1 to 3 days to get here? The sun is so slow it's a wonder morning isn't late everyday.
 
2013-08-22 09:12:45 AM
Durandal is writing headlines now?

fc08.deviantart.net
 
2013-08-22 09:13:38 AM

some_beer_drinker: doesn't this happen, like, all the farking time??


Sort-of.

It's been happening more lately because the Sun is near the peak of the 11 year solar cycle.  That means more CMEs, and more powerful CMEs.   That's why it seems like you're hearing about it more than you used to, say, 5 years ago.

Oddly enough, this cycle is much weaker than the ones that have preceded it.  I've been watching them now for about 23 years now.  I got my first ham radio license back in 1990, at the peak of the cycle 22, and man, it was *GLORIOUS*.  Using 25 watts from my car, I talked all over the place using voice on 10 meters (28 MHz).  The next cycle was nearly as good.

Now, however, I'm having trouble using Morse (which has a significant signal-to-noise ratio advantage over voice) at the same power level with a more efficient antenna.  Propagation is spotty, some days it's there, most days it isn't, whereas back in 1990 - 1992 it was open pretty much every day, well into the night, with solid propagation.
 
2013-08-22 09:15:03 AM

nekom: Any chance of getting northern lights at 40°N?  Only saw them here once in my life, very subtle but awesome to have seen.


Saw them one at about 44N 20 years ago.  Was at first wondering why the clouds were moving so fast then it dawned on us what was going on, so we pulled over for a while and watched it.  Then got back in the car, drove back to campus, and drank a lot of tequila.

/fortunately we forgot we just watched Highlander 2
//didn't forget the northern lights
 
2013-08-22 09:15:47 AM

dittybopper: Now, however, I'm having trouble using Morse (which has a significant signal-to-noise ratio advantage over voice) at the same power level with a more efficient antenna. Propagation is spotty, some days it's there, most days it isn't, whereas back in 1990 - 1992 it was open pretty much every day, well into the night, with solid propagation.


When the zombies come and the world crumbles, can I come to your camp of survivors?
 
2013-08-22 09:17:10 AM

dittybopper: some_beer_drinker: doesn't this happen, like, all the farking time??



yes, but i'm guessing like 359 out of 360 times it misses the earth
 
2013-08-22 09:18:54 AM
img.gawkerassets.com

and so it begins
 
2013-08-22 09:20:07 AM

MountainClimber: usttsdw: dittybopper: I'll be keeping an eye on SpaceWeather.com, and an ear to 50.090 MHz for some of that nice, raspy auroral propagation.

As of right now, the planetary K index is a 2.

I have no idea what you are talking about, but I am intrigued. Links?


http://www.n0hr.com/radio_propagation.htm


I don't have you favorited as a ham.  Are you one?  I keep a list for the next Fark QSO Party.
 
2013-08-22 09:20:11 AM
I remember the 2003 flare in October. Here in Maine, I saw an Aurora in he middle of the day.
Friggin awesome.
 
2013-08-22 09:20:24 AM
These things always sound a lot more impressive until you go to solarham.com and they are like "oh yeah well the sun is still near record low activity, but there was the most minor of CMEs which has the potential to cause a tiny amount of geomagnetic activity.  Explorers standing at the magnetic north pole might see aurorae."
 
2013-08-22 09:21:36 AM

IdBeCrazyIf: dittybopper: Now, however, I'm having trouble using Morse (which has a significant signal-to-noise ratio advantage over voice) at the same power level with a more efficient antenna. Propagation is spotty, some days it's there, most days it isn't, whereas back in 1990 - 1992 it was open pretty much every day, well into the night, with solid propagation.

When the zombies come and the world crumbles, can I come to your camp of survivors?


That depends.  What is your diet like?  Do you eat a lot of corn?  Could you post an MRI image so I can see how much marbling you have?
 
2013-08-22 09:23:43 AM

dittybopper: It's been happening more lately because the Sun is near the peak of the 11 year solar cycle.  That means more CMEs, and more powerful CMEs.   That's why it seems like you're hearing about it more than you used to, say, 5 years ago.

Oddly enough, this cycle is much weaker than the ones that have preceded it.  I've been watching them now for about 23 years now.  I got my first ham radio license back in 1990, at the peak of the cycle 22, and man, it was *GLORIOUS*.  Using 25 watts from my car, I talked all over the place using voice on 10 meters (28 MHz).  The next cycle was nearly as good.

Now, however, I'm having trouble using Morse (which has a significant signal-to-noise ratio advantage over voice) at the same power level with a more efficient antenna.  Propagation is spotty, some days it's there, most days it isn't, whereas back in 1990 - 1992 it was open pretty much every day, well into the night, with solid propagation.


In 1992 I lived in a place for which the only available form of communication was ham radio.  We could use it to patch into the US phone system and talk to friends and family, but that was illegal because fark you all, we are telecoms and we own lawmakers.
 
2013-08-22 09:24:15 AM

Publikwerks: I remember the 2003 flare in October. Here in Maine, I saw an Aurora in he middle of the day.
Friggin awesome.


I believe this was the flare I saw in the evening sky in CT driving home from work. Nearly ran off the damn road.
 
2013-08-22 09:24:47 AM

dittybopper: That depends. What is your diet like? Do you eat a lot of corn? Could you post an MRI image so I can see how much marbling you have?


assets.nydailynews.com
 
2013-08-22 09:28:28 AM

TomD9938: Weaver95: If the sun keeps doing that, it'll go blind.

It's just a phase.


i.imgur.com
 
2013-08-22 09:31:03 AM

Hollie Maea: In 1992 I lived in a place for which the only available form of communication was ham radio.  We could use it to patch into the US phone system and talk to friends and family, but that was illegal because fark you all, we are telecoms and we own lawmakers.


Actually, phone patches have never been illegal for the US, and they certainly weren't illegal in 1992:  I used them back before cell phones were common.  A lot of repeaters had "autopatch" that would allow you to make a phone call automatically from a handheld or mobile ham radio.  If you were living within the US, or a US territory, then non-business (ie., personal use only) phone patches were legal.

The problem is when you are talking about transmitting from a foreign nation that doesn't have a third-party traffic agreement with the US.   Here is the ARRL page about it, with a list of current nations we have third-party agreements with.  Often there isn't an agreement because the government owns the telecommunications agency, through the national post office, so they don't want you to side-step their system by using ham radio.
 
2013-08-22 09:32:07 AM
Zalgo: He comes.
 
2013-08-22 09:36:26 AM

Publikwerks: I remember the 2003 flare in October. Here in Maine, I saw an Aurora in he middle of the day.
Friggin awesome.


I saw the same one in NE Ohio.  It was Halloween 2003 and the kids were out Trick-or-Treating.  It was a beautiful warm evening, and half the sky turned red.  It lasted about an hour.
 
2013-08-22 09:39:40 AM
Snooze. Wasn't even an M class flare.
 
2013-08-22 09:43:20 AM

TomD9938: Weaver95: If the sun keeps doing that, it'll go blind.

It's just a phase.


Well played, sir
 
2013-08-22 09:43:28 AM

soopey: Snooze. Wasn't even an M class flare.


Yep.

For those who don't know, in order of severity solar flares are classed as A, B, C, M, and X class.  C is the middle class.  The ones you really have to worry about are the X class flares, especially the more powerful ones.
 
2013-08-22 09:44:12 AM
We'll be safe once the sun sets.
 
2013-08-22 09:44:29 AM

enry: nekom: Any chance of getting northern lights at 40°N?  Only saw them here once in my life, very subtle but awesome to have seen.

Saw them one at about 44N 20 years ago.  Was at first wondering why the clouds were moving so fast then it dawned on us what was going on, so we pulled over for a while and watched it.  Then got back in the car, drove back to campus, and drank a lot of tequila.

/fortunately we forgot we just watched Highlander 2
//didn't forget the northern lights


I saw them in the late 90's/early 00's.  Not NEARLY as impressive as they get way up north, it was like a vague shifting red fog.  I only knew what it was because I knew to be looking for it, otherwise I probably wouldn't have even noticed.  Still cool to see.
 
2013-08-22 09:46:37 AM
Had to... Sorry.
 
2013-08-22 09:49:47 AM

yves0010: Had to... Sorry.


Lets try this again...

southparkstudios.mtvnimages.com
Its coming right for us!

/Stupid picture did not link!
 
2013-08-22 09:56:21 AM

dittybopper: Hollie Maea: In 1992 I lived in a place for which the only available form of communication was ham radio.  We could use it to patch into the US phone system and talk to friends and family, but that was illegal because fark you all, we are telecoms and we own lawmakers.

Actually, phone patches have never been illegal for the US, and they certainly weren't illegal in 1992:  I used them back before cell phones were common.  A lot of repeaters had "autopatch" that would allow you to make a phone call automatically from a handheld or mobile ham radio.  If you were living within the US, or a US territory, then non-business (ie., personal use only) phone patches were legal.

The problem is when you are talking about transmitting from a foreign nation that doesn't have a third-party traffic agreement with the US.   Here is the ARRL page about it, with a list of current nations we have third-party agreements with.  Often there isn't an agreement because the government owns the telecommunications agency, through the national post office, so they don't want you to side-step their system by using ham radio.


Yeah, we were in Papua New Guinea.  The phone system was in fact part of the government owned Post and Telecom Corporation.  But it was also 200 miles to the nearest phone service so there wasn't really any system to sidestep....
 
2013-08-22 10:02:20 AM

Hollie Maea: Yeah, we were in Papua New Guinea.  The phone system was in fact part of the government owned Post and Telecom Corporation.  But it was also 200 miles to the nearest phone service so there wasn't really any system to sidestep....


That would explain it.

Moral of the story:  Get your ham radio license if you are going into some God-forsaken corner of the World.  Then you don't have to worry about third party agreements.
 
2013-08-22 10:04:49 AM

dittybopper: MountainClimber: usttsdw: dittybopper: I'll be keeping an eye on SpaceWeather.com, and an ear to 50.090 MHz for some of that nice, raspy auroral propagation.

As of right now, the planetary K index is a 2.

I have no idea what you are talking about, but I am intrigued. Links?


http://www.n0hr.com/radio_propagation.htm

I don't have you favorited as a ham.  Are you one?  I keep a list for the next Fark QSO Party.


Sorry for the threadjack, but I'm about 5-6 weeks away from being back on the air and with a much better antenna system than I had before.  Is there going to be another Fark QSO Party?  I'd love to do another one of these!  Will it be announced on The Zed?
 
2013-08-22 10:06:01 AM

dittybopper: Moral of the story:  Get your ham radio license if you are going into some God-forsaken corner of the World.  Then you don't have to worry about third party agreements.


Don't get me wrong...we (my mother, actually) had the license, and we used it to talk to people in the US.  It was just that a lot of the people we wanted to talk to, such as my grandparents, didn't have ham radios.  Hence the need to phone patch.  Which we were forbidden to do (but did anyway).
 
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