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(CBS News)   Fast-food workers encouraged to speed up their replacement by robots   (cbsnews.com) divider line 76
    More: Dumbass, MoneyWatch, fast food, Service Employees International Union, Congressional Progressive Caucus, work stoppages, United Food & Commercial Workers, UAW, fast food restaurants  
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1760 clicks; posted to Business » on 21 Aug 2013 at 8:47 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-21 08:49:57 PM
Nice subby.
 
2013-08-21 08:58:03 PM
i39.tinypic.com

Longer term, yeah, we're farked as a nation.  However, I will say that I've traveled to places with minimum wages over $10/hour (parts of Canada, Australia, Scandinavia) and they still do have fast-food workers, so we're a little ways off still.
 
2013-08-21 09:00:01 PM
Good.  A robot is at least 50% less likely to fark it up.  They might even get the burgers put together resembling the ads.
 
2013-08-21 09:07:39 PM
OK so if we bring FF workers up to 30K per year, does that mean that I should get a bump as well? This is my only question.

Yes I know they need more, but still I worked damn hard and took out student loans to get where I am.

I really just am not sure about this one
 
2013-08-21 09:08:17 PM
What? And lose our wonderful service economy?
 
2013-08-21 09:16:26 PM
Why stop at $15 an hour? We should pay every fast food worker $100,000 a year. Makes perfect economic sense to me. It's not like any pimply faced teenager can flip a burger. It takes years of training and experience to do that.
 
2013-08-21 09:22:57 PM
That burger will cost you a whole dollar more, how will you ever cope with such an egregious rape of your wallet?
 
2013-08-21 09:23:29 PM

Catsaregreen: Why stop at $15 an hour? We should pay every fast food worker $100,000 a year. Makes perfect economic sense to me. It's not like any pimply faced teenager can flip a burger. It takes years of training and experience to do that.


8/10 needs more Barry and free market.
 
2013-08-21 09:31:14 PM

TofuTheAlmighty: That burger will cost you a whole dollar more, how will you ever cope with such an egregious rape of your wallet?


Here's the kicker.  Those with means don't frequent fast food establishments often.  That extra dollar isn't coming out of a wealthy person's pocket, it's likely coming out of the pocket of someone below the poverty line.

So we raise the income of the poor on the backs of the poor.  Yeah, this'll work.
 
2013-08-21 09:34:42 PM
Min wage in Australia-    $15.30 USD - Combo Meal cost (Big Mac or similar) $8 USD - source
Min wage in USA -          $7.25 USD  - Combo Meal cost (Big Mac or similar) $8 USD  - source

/but please, don't let my facts get in the way of your ignorance
 
2013-08-21 09:37:40 PM

moefuggenbrew: Min wage in Australia-    $15.30 USD - Combo Meal cost (Big Mac or similar) $8 USD - source
Min wage in USA -          $7.25 USD  - Combo Meal cost (Big Mac or similar) $8 USD  - source

/but please, don't let my facts get in the way of your ignorance


But some Aussie is not gonna be able to buy a second Gulfstream this year:(
 
2013-08-21 09:43:54 PM

rohar: TofuTheAlmighty: That burger will cost you a whole dollar more, how will you ever cope with such an egregious rape of your wallet?

Here's the kicker.  Those with means don't frequent fast food establishments often.  That extra dollar isn't coming out of a wealthy person's pocket, it's likely coming out of the pocket of someone below the poverty line.

So we raise the income of the poor on the backs of the poor.  Yeah, this'll work.


McDonalds will set the price of their food to whatever total market value is out there divided by the number of units they intend to sell no matter how any expense rises and falls.
 
2013-08-21 09:43:54 PM

rohar: TofuTheAlmighty: That burger will cost you a whole dollar more, how will you ever cope with such an egregious rape of your wallet?

Here's the kicker.  Those with means don't frequent fast food establishments often.  That extra dollar isn't coming out of a wealthy person's pocket, it's likely coming out of the pocket of someone below the poverty line.

So we raise the income of the poor on the backs of the poor.  Yeah, this'll work.


I call BS.  Businessmen frequent fast food places fairly often because A) it's quick and B) they're busy, so they need food that's fast.
 
2013-08-21 09:48:54 PM
Look, fast food workers/retail workers, they make a sizable part of our service economy. At the moment they can barely afford to cover the basics. Which is rent, transportation, phone, and food. We're not even talking healthcare, because ain't nobody can afford that at that level of income. It stands to reason if they have more disposable income they spend more in the economy. On cars, houses, etc. They're not just peons, they're consumers who aren't spending enough in the economy because they can't afford to.
 
2013-08-21 09:54:39 PM
The American taxpayer is subsidizing the low wages by providing help with the basic services people relying on those wages require. By not raising the minimum wage, we're basically giving free money to companies like McDonald's et al..
 
2013-08-21 09:58:03 PM

Cathedralmaster: The American taxpayer is subsidizing the low wages by providing help with the basic services people relying on those wages require. By not raising the minimum wage, we're basically giving free money to companies like McDonald's et al..


which is why this strike doesnt go far enough. Anyone making minimum wage should be striking, not just fast food workers.
 
2013-08-21 10:00:29 PM
What I thought of when I read Subby's headline

Or on Kindle if you can afford $0.99

/Not affiliated
 
2013-08-21 10:06:07 PM

Cathedralmaster: The American taxpayer is subsidizing the low wages by providing help with the basic services people relying on those wages require. By not raising the minimum wage, we're basically giving free money to companies like McDonald's et al..


McDonalds et al know that, and they seem perfectly okay with the arrangement.  And they'll always have their defenders, as we've seen in this thread.

Always fascinating to me to read threads like this one and be reminded just how many people don't understand that business ethics is a cruel, deformed, malnourished version of actual social ethics.  "Let's make sure everybody suffers" isn't a sustainable business model, let alone a sustainable model for a society.
 
2013-08-21 10:06:09 PM

moefuggenbrew: Min wage in Australia-    $15.30 USD - Combo Meal cost (Big Mac or similar) $8 USD - source
Min wage in USA -          $7.25 USD  - Combo Meal cost (Big Mac or similar) $8 USD  - source

/but please, don't let my facts get in the way of your ignorance


31.media.tumblr.com

http://31.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lxpbrn3HC01rn95k2o1_250.gif
 
2013-08-21 10:10:59 PM
It's been done.
 
2013-08-21 10:18:40 PM

TofuTheAlmighty: That burger will cost you a whole dollar more, how will you ever cope with such an egregious rape of your wallet?


Easy.  I'll go somewhere that pays their workers appropriately.
 
2013-08-21 10:32:00 PM

rohar: TofuTheAlmighty: That burger will cost you a whole dollar more, how will you ever cope with such an egregious rape of your wallet?

Here's the kicker.  Those with means don't frequent fast food establishments often.  That extra dollar isn't coming out of a wealthy person's pocket, it's likely coming out of the pocket of someone below the poverty line.

So we raise the income of the poor on the backs of the poor.  Yeah, this'll work.


Simply put, you can't have a sustainable economy where people are paid above the value of their work. There has to be a floor value (preferably at a local level in order to account for variations in cost of living) for the cost of labor to prevent feedback loops and gaming the system--but it's completely foolish to expect that people doing minimum wage jobs should be able to have a comfortable lifestyle on that income alone, because those jobs add minimal value to the economy. Jacking up the minimum wage for any reason other than keeping up with inflation is like making a ramp by piling up quicksand. Eventually you'll drive everyone who isn't rich down into the minimum-wage bracket and the cost of living will be so high that hyperinflation will set in, further widening the gap between rich and poor. The rich, having most of their wealth in the form of property, investments, and real estate, will do just fine, while everyone else will be scraping by.

If you want to improve people's quality of life, you need to attack the root of the problem: the lack of well-paying, middle-class jobs. No one should be working at McDonald's in their 30s except perhaps as a manager. If someone is willing but unqualified to work a better job, society has a duty to train/educate them and it's also our duty to bear the cost of at least some of that training, since better-qualified workers doing more valuable jobs add more to the economy and make all of us richer.

How to create those jobs: I don't know. Skilled labor is what built the American dream, but most skilled labor can be largely replaced by automation (or starving Asian children) except in some niche applications. Unskilled labor, for the most part, will cease to have any value at all once robots become cheap enough. We simply can't ramp up production enough to employ everyone because there's no way to create that much demand. Everyone can only practically own so many cars and washing machines, however cheap they might become. People involved in design and testing of new products and technologies have job security, of course, but there are only so many jobs like that to go around. We don't need fifty million aerospace engineers, or a hundred million IT security professionals. Only a handful can be professional athletes, or best-selling novelists, or nationally-syndicated pundits. Academic research doesn't make much of a jobs program. We don't really need secretaries or receptionists anymore except at the top levels (smartphones took our jerbs!).

What's a field where demand only goes up over time? Sex always sells, of course. We could train people to be high-class escorts, but only the good-looking need apply and taxpayer-subsidized plastic surgery to turn ugly schlubs into sex god(ess)s is just too hilarious to take seriously. Talk about a "service economy"....
 
2013-08-21 10:50:48 PM

Arctic Phoenix: rohar: TofuTheAlmighty: That burger will cost you a whole dollar more, how will you ever cope with such an egregious rape of your wallet?

Here's the kicker.  Those with means don't frequent fast food establishments often.  That extra dollar isn't coming out of a wealthy person's pocket, it's likely coming out of the pocket of someone below the poverty line.

So we raise the income of the poor on the backs of the poor.  Yeah, this'll work.

I call BS.  Businessmen frequent fast food places fairly often because A) it's quick and B) they're busy, so they need food that's fast.


A manager at Jiffy Lube isn't a "businessman".
 
jgi
2013-08-21 10:55:18 PM

Arctic Phoenix: rohar: TofuTheAlmighty: That burger will cost you a whole dollar more, how will you ever cope with such an egregious rape of your wallet?

Here's the kicker.  Those with means don't frequent fast food establishments often.  That extra dollar isn't coming out of a wealthy person's pocket, it's likely coming out of the pocket of someone below the poverty line.

So we raise the income of the poor on the backs of the poor.  Yeah, this'll work.

I call BS.  Businessmen frequent fast food places fairly often because A) it's quick and B) they're busy, so they need food that's fast.


I disagree. I am not a "businessman" but I expense my lunches to my company; I usually spend $15-20 per day on lunch without batting an eye. One of my clients has a full-time chef who makes the entire company breakfast and lunch. None of the real "businessmen" I know would go to McDonald's or any fast food like that. When you have money you realize that food is fuel and you prefer premium.
 
2013-08-21 10:58:38 PM

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: If you want to improve people's quality of life, you need to attack the root of the problem: the lack of well-paying, middle-class jobs.

How to create those jobs: I don't know. Skilled labor is what built the American dream, but most skilled labor can be largely replaced by automation (or starving Asian children) except in some niche applications. Unskilled labor, for the most part, will cease to have any value at all once robots become cheap enough. We simply can't ramp up production enough to employ everyone because there's no way to create that much demand. Everyone can only practically own so many cars and washing machines, however cheap they might become. People involved in design and testing of new products and technologies have job security, of course, but there are only so many jobs like that to go around. We don't need fifty million aerospace engineers, or a hundred million IT security professionals. Only a handful can be professional athletes, or best-selling novelists, or nationally-syndicated pundits. Academic research doesn't make much of a jobs program. We don't really need secretaries or receptionists anymore except at the top levels (smartphones took our jerbs!).


This is a problem we've been staring into since the 1920s phase of industrialization.  Keynes, Arthur Dahlberg, and plenty of others recognized it then... that everyone could have a 'pretty good for 1920' living with fewer, fewer, and fewer man-hours.  There were two choices.   MASSIVE consumerism, which obviously we took.  Don't need a new washer? Buy one anyway! It's red! And designed to break in five years!  The other choice was artificially limiting working hours.  Keynes thought we'd be working 20-hour weeks by now.  Hell, Richard Nixon campaigned on the national 30-hour week back in the 1950s.

One problem with the latter choice is that artificially limited hours serve to magnify inherent skill differences.  Only so many people can become gifted heart surgeons (although certainly more than are now, for sure).  The AMA wouldn't mind restricting the field even more, and that would drive up the per-hour rate of heart surgeons even faster than a 30-hour-week would drive up the cost of lumpenlabor.
 
2013-08-21 10:59:30 PM

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Simply put, you can't have a sustainable economy where people are paid above the value of their work.


Have you even looked at the math for some of this stuff?
Starting every Wal-Mart worker at $12.00 would cost the average consumer something like 40 cents per visit.
Doubling the wages of every McDonald's worker from the fry cook to the CEO would raise the price of a Big Mac something like 16 cents.

It becomes mind-boggling when you see more of these numbers. The value of the work these people do is definitely there, the value is much more than you think it would be, and they just aren't getting a piece of it.
 
2013-08-21 11:03:28 PM
No one really wants to be a fast food worker anyway.
 
2013-08-21 11:05:11 PM

Sergeant Grumbles: Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Simply put, you can't have a sustainable economy where people are paid above the value of their work.

Have you even looked at the math for some of this stuff?
Starting every Wal-Mart worker at $12.00 would cost the average consumer something like 40 cents per visit.
Doubling the wages of every McDonald's worker from the fry cook to the CEO would raise the price of a Big Mac something like 16 cents.

It becomes mind-boggling when you see more of these numbers. The value of the work these people do is definitely there, the value is much more than you think it would be, and they just aren't getting a piece of it.


If your job function can be rationally replaced by an automaton (and McDonald's workers aren't far from that) what value is there?
 
2013-08-21 11:08:39 PM
You don't think robots won't replace you one day too subby?
 
2013-08-21 11:10:27 PM
Can someone explain to me why McDonalds wouldn't put buttons on their drive through menu and put it within reach of the cars? Wouldn't customers be able to handle this? Wouldn't they, on average, probably buy more food if they didn't have to try and syn/ack with Lurleene via a speaker? Wouldn't it discourage people from making stupid requests like "no pickles" or "a little ice...not all the way to the top but not just 3 cubes neither!" and make things easier for the people making the food?
 
2013-08-21 11:12:05 PM

rohar: If your job function can be rationally replaced by an automaton (and McDonald's workers aren't far from that) what value is there?


The value of the automaton, at the very least. Herp.
 
2013-08-21 11:14:55 PM

Sergeant Grumbles: rohar: If your job function can be rationally replaced by an automaton (and McDonald's workers aren't far from that) what value is there?

The value of the automaton, at the very least. Herp.


So the value is decreasing at hyperbolic rates.

My point, you made it.

I'm not arguing against a higher minimum wage, I'm trying to find a solution.  Your assertions are flawed.  In the end, if we use them as part of the solution, it will be flawed as well.
 
2013-08-21 11:16:01 PM

Sergeant Grumbles: Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Simply put, you can't have a sustainable economy where people are paid above the value of their work.

Have you even looked at the math for some of this stuff?
Starting every Wal-Mart worker at $12.00 would cost the average consumer something like 40 cents per visit.
Doubling the wages of every McDonald's worker from the fry cook to the CEO would raise the price of a Big Mac something like 16 cents.

It becomes mind-boggling when you see more of these numbers. The value of the work these people do is definitely there, the value is much more than you think it would be, and they just aren't getting a piece of it.


Try closer to $1.28 to $5.27 increase (per Big Mac) since over 80% of McDonalds are run by franchisees who spend up to a third of a store's income on employee pay. The 16 cent increase would be accurate if McDonalds actually ran every store, but they dont. Apples and oranges. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/29/mcdonalds-salaries_n_3672006 . html
 
2013-08-21 11:19:35 PM
Wow the farking elitism in this thread is either a lie or just over the top. I have had more than one OTR impromptu conference over a Double Cheeseburger.

Who let the GOP out of the politics tab?
 
2013-08-21 11:20:46 PM
Do fast food people not know what other people make?  I know my gig out of college didn't pay $15/hr (at the time or with time adjustmented), do you think all of us cubicle jockeys are running around at six figures while you noble burger flippers toil against the hand of oppression?
 
2013-08-21 11:21:50 PM

The Troof hurts: Sergeant Grumbles: Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Simply put, you can't have a sustainable economy where people are paid above the value of their work.

Have you even looked at the math for some of this stuff?
Starting every Wal-Mart worker at $12.00 would cost the average consumer something like 40 cents per visit.
Doubling the wages of every McDonald's worker from the fry cook to the CEO would raise the price of a Big Mac something like 16 cents.

It becomes mind-boggling when you see more of these numbers. The value of the work these people do is definitely there, the value is much more than you think it would be, and they just aren't getting a piece of it.

Try closer to $1.28 to $5.27 increase (per Big Mac) since over 80% of McDonalds are run by franchisees who spend up to a third of a store's income on employee pay. The 16 cent increase would be accurate if McDonalds actually ran every store, but they dont. Apples and oranges. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/29/mcdonalds-salaries_n_3672006 . html


Ah, stand corrected there. I know I can cite the Wal-Mart one, if I have to.
Also have to wonder for franchises if half of the problem is too many of them. When I worked for Quiznos, it was a problem because Quiznos would practically let anyone open a Quiznos anywhere, even to the detriment of other franchises in the area. I have three McDonald's within 5 miles of me, and there's only one major highway....
Oh well another argument entirely.
 
2013-08-21 11:24:36 PM

jayhawk88: Can someone explain to me why McDonalds wouldn't put buttons on their drive through menu and put it within reach of the cars? Wouldn't customers be able to handle this? Wouldn't they, on average, probably buy more food if they didn't have to try and syn/ack with Lurleene via a speaker? Wouldn't it discourage people from making stupid requests like "no pickles" or "a little ice...not all the way to the top but not just 3 cubes neither!" and make things easier for the people making the food?


Uh, have you seen people at the self checkout lane?
 
2013-08-21 11:29:26 PM

jayhawk88: Can someone explain to me why McDonalds wouldn't put buttons on their drive through menu and put it within reach of the cars? Wouldn't customers be able to handle this? Wouldn't they, on average, probably buy more food if they didn't have to try and syn/ack with Lurleene via a speaker? Wouldn't it discourage people from making stupid requests like "no pickles" or "a little ice...not all the way to the top but not just 3 cubes neither!" and make things easier for the people making the food?


It is an interesting question.  Lower end ramen shops are like that in Japan.  There's a vending machine at the door with pictures of the food and buttons. Makes your change.  Typically it spits out a little ticket stub that you hand to the server or cook.  It seemed a little unnecessary at first, but it did actually make things more efficient.

Likewise, I generally order pizza online. The Chinese takeout too... and I don't have to fight thick accents in a loud kitchen.  Best explanation I've heard is that there are a lot of only-somewhat-literate people to deal with.  Like... people who don't use ATMs (or even bank at all) because it's all too much. Which strikes me as improbable and yet... maybe possible.  And also scary as all hell if they're driving.
 
2013-08-21 11:30:41 PM

rohar: My point, you made it.

I'm not arguing against a higher minimum wage, I'm trying to find a solution. Your assertions are flawed. In the end, if we use them as part of the solution, it will be flawed as well.


Asking a stupid question really isn't a good way of making a point.
There's no flaw in pointing out workers aren't getting a piece of the value they create. But as you're probably going to say, the low wages are what is staving off automation. What is your solution?
 
2013-08-21 11:40:21 PM

Sergeant Grumbles: rohar: My point, you made it.

I'm not arguing against a higher minimum wage, I'm trying to find a solution. Your assertions are flawed. In the end, if we use them as part of the solution, it will be flawed as well.

Asking a stupid question really isn't a good way of making a point.
There's no flaw in pointing out workers aren't getting a piece of the value they create. But as you're probably going to say, the low wages are what is staving off automation. What is your solution?


I don't know if you noticed, but I wrote "I'm looking for a solution".  By definition, that must mean I don't have one.

Let's be honest here.  At the rate of expansion and reduction in cost of automation, I'd expect a few fully automated Mc'Ds within 10 years.  What does raising the minimum wage do when nobody's working there?
 
2013-08-21 11:41:30 PM

moefuggenbrew: Min wage in Australia-    $15.30 USD - Combo Meal cost (Big Mac or similar) $8 USD - source
Min wage in USA -          $7.25 USD  - Combo Meal cost (Big Mac or similar) $8 USD  - source

/but please, don't let my facts get in the way of your ignorance


Cost of living in Australia is ~1.5 times higher than the average in the US. Especially housing.
 
2013-08-21 11:50:25 PM

rohar: Let's be honest here. At the rate of expansion and reduction in cost of automation, I'd expect a few fully automated Mc'Ds within 10 years. What does raising the minimum wage do when nobody's working there?


Someone has to monitor/operate the machines. Someone has to clean them. Someone has to fix them. There's still value to be had. The only real problem is sending all of it to the machine's owner. But valuing capital over labor is a different problem...
 
2013-08-21 11:51:16 PM

mrlewish: You don't think robots won't replace you one day too subby?


I'm not subby but I know damned well that I can't be replaced by a robot or by some slave in India.

/it's good to have a career instead of a mere job
 
2013-08-21 11:58:35 PM

Smeggy Smurf: mrlewish: You don't think robots won't replace you one day too subby?

I'm not subby but I know damned well that I can't be replaced by a robot or by some slave in India.

/it's good to have a career instead of a mere job


HAHA, your cute. Everyone is replaceable. Everyone
 
2013-08-21 11:58:43 PM
Sergeant Grumbles: rohar: My point, you made it.

I'm not arguing against a higher minimum wage, I'm trying to find a solution. Your assertions are flawed. In the end, if we use them as part of the solution, it will be flawed as well.

Asking a stupid question really isn't a good way of making a point.
There's no flaw in pointing out workers aren't getting a piece of the value they create. But as you're probably going to say, the low wages are what is staving off automation. What is your solution?

I don't know if you noticed, but I wrote "I'm looking for a solution".  By definition, that must mean I don't have one.

Let's be honest here.  At the rate of expansion and reduction in cost of automation, I'd expect a few fully automated Mc'Ds within 10 years.  What does raising the minimum wage do when nobody's working there?


Slash the work week to 20 or so hours to divide up the jobs that still need humans amongst more people. Subsidize the shiat out of education so people who want to move 'up' into the new economy have the chance to. Just straight cut a bunch of checks to the people who really cant hack it at anything more complex than burger slinging so they don't starve to death under a bridge and can at least participate in the economy as consumers.
 
2013-08-22 12:00:27 AM

Piizzadude: Smeggy Smurf: mrlewish: You don't think robots won't replace you one day too subby?

I'm not subby but I know damned well that I can't be replaced by a robot or by some slave in India.

/it's good to have a career instead of a mere job

HAHA, your cute. Everyone is replaceable. Everyone


True but not by a robot.  There aren't many out there who can make the software I use sing a song and paint a pretty picture too.
 
2013-08-22 12:02:04 AM

Smeggy Smurf: Piizzadude: Smeggy Smurf: mrlewish: You don't think robots won't replace you one day too subby?

I'm not subby but I know damned well that I can't be replaced by a robot or by some slave in India.

/it's good to have a career instead of a mere job

HAHA, your cute. Everyone is replaceable. Everyone

True but not by a robot.  There aren't many out there who can make the software I use sing a song and paint a pretty picture too.


There are plenty in India that can
 
2013-08-22 12:15:25 AM

Ned Stark: Slash the work week to 20 or so hours to divide up the jobs that still need humans amongst more people. Subsidize the shiat out of education so people who want to move 'up' into the new economy have the chance to. Just straight cut a bunch of checks to the people who really cant hack it at anything more complex than burger slinging so they don't starve to death under a bridge and can at least participate in the economy as consumers.


The former takes some pretty dogged enforcement, at least for a few generations until it's culturally ingrained.  Too much temptation to 'cheat' and work 30 or 40 hours.   Like we did after WWII, when we slowly creeped back to 45+ hour workweeks ("look at how much time-and-a-half I'm getting!") to 50 hour ("I'm salary... but look at that awesome salary") to 55-and-a-Blackberry ("okay, I'm pretty much boned here").

The latter, though, yeah.  I mean, this is the one thing that would get Karl Marx and Milton Friedman to shake hands. The modern GOP center is to the right of Goldwater, Nixon, and Milton Friedman, God help us all. Not necessarily 'participate in the economy as consumers' (maybe C.H. Douglas and the Canadian 'Social Credit' movement people saw the need for demand in those terms), but enough to avoid destitution, keep crime rates low-ish, and keep kids fed (some of whom will be exceptional).
 
2013-08-22 12:35:18 AM

Piizzadude: Smeggy Smurf: Piizzadude: Smeggy Smurf: mrlewish: You don't think robots won't replace you one day too subby?

I'm not subby but I know damned well that I can't be replaced by a robot or by some slave in India.

/it's good to have a career instead of a mere job

HAHA, your cute. Everyone is replaceable. Everyone

True but not by a robot.  There aren't many out there who can make the software I use sing a song and paint a pretty picture too.

There are plenty in India that can


It's illegal for that to happen.  By law in this state all work must be done under the direct supervision of the licensed architect signing the drawings.  That does not mean Gupta Goatfarker in FarkYouistan can do the work.  Anyway, those dumbasses can't speak English well enough to understand the difference between a soffit and a sewer line.
 
2013-08-22 12:43:27 AM

Smeggy Smurf: Piizzadude: Smeggy Smurf: Piizzadude: Smeggy Smurf: mrlewish: You don't think robots won't replace you one day too subby?

I'm not subby but I know damned well that I can't be replaced by a robot or by some slave in India.

/it's good to have a career instead of a mere job

HAHA, your cute. Everyone is replaceable. Everyone

True but not by a robot.  There aren't many out there who can make the software I use sing a song and paint a pretty picture too.

There are plenty in India that can

It's illegal for that to happen.  By law in this state all work must be done under the direct supervision of the licensed architect signing the drawings.  That does not mean Gupta Goatfarker in FarkYouistan can do the work.  Anyway, those dumbasses can't speak English well enough to understand the difference between a soffit and a sewer line.


So you're saying you have a government mandated artificial protection that eliminates global competition?
 
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