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(Jalopnik)   If you've ever wondered why Japanese cars only use English badges - even in Japan - this is your lucky day   (jalopnik.com ) divider line
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7880 clicks; posted to Geek » on 21 Aug 2013 at 4:22 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



39 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-08-21 01:20:20 PM  
"Badges? We don't need no stinking badges!"
encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com
 
2013-08-21 02:08:01 PM  
Because the Japanese are so accepting of outside cultures? Really, that's your explanation?
 
2013-08-21 02:11:54 PM  

Voiceofreason01: Because the Japanese are so accepting of outside cultures? Really, that's your explanation?


That is clearly a recent trend.
 
2013-08-21 03:28:27 PM  
I never knew Japanese cars in Japan didn't use Japanese lettering. So no, I've never wondered that.
 
2013-08-21 04:30:34 PM  
I like the comment:

Next time write why the germans love numbers. I always wondering that.

You know who else liked to use numbers?
 
2013-08-21 04:31:21 PM  
Which is why a racing game made in Japan will have 60 different models of a Nissan Skyline, yet only 20 BMWs.  They are so accepting of outside cultures!
 
2013-08-21 04:31:29 PM  
That read like a Japanese guy decided "I am going to so fark with this white boy"
 
2013-08-21 04:46:02 PM  

Voiceofreason01: Because the Japanese are so accepting of outside cultures? Really, that's your explanation?


I also call bullshiat.  If anything, I'd say they're keeping it in the Latin alphabet to maintain the foreign-ness of the car.  Maybe they attach some exoticism to foreign things, but that's not really unique to Japan.
 
2013-08-21 04:50:03 PM  
I wouldn't say they are all in English. My mother-in-law drives a "Witz," which is German for "joke."

Maybe they are all in Latin characters, but not just English.
 
2013-08-21 04:54:26 PM  
Japan is plenty open to outside cultures, just not other Asian cultures.
 
2013-08-21 05:06:41 PM  
But how do explain the oversized add on rear-view mirrors?
 
2013-08-21 05:06:53 PM  

impaler: I never knew Japanese cars in Japan didn't use Japanese lettering. So no, I've never wondered that.


And now that I know, I really don't care.
 
2013-08-21 05:19:48 PM  
"in brochures and advertisements and other materials the name may be written in Kanji or Katakana or the adapted Chinese characters Japan uses"

So, they may be in kanji or katakana... or kanji again?

It's a very Japanese perspective to describe using a different writing system for loanwords as "honoring" their origin, rather than as keeping 日本語 (the Japanese language) pure through ghettoization of other languages.
 
2013-08-21 06:00:46 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2013-08-21 06:02:33 PM  

All2morrowsparTs: But how do explain the oversized add on rear-view mirrors?


That is out of respect for turtles, as the turtle spirit brings good fortune in new activities, such as changing direction.

/haven't a clue
 
2013-08-21 06:15:36 PM  

Voiceofreason01: Because the Japanese are so accepting of outside cultures? Really, that's your explanation?


I read it more of the Japanese associate cars with English-speaking cultures (they were invented there and all)... and its custom to brand such things with that lettering/language.  Kinda interesting.
 
2013-08-21 06:16:23 PM  
No shiat.  There's a lot of brands in Japan with names written in romaji.
 
2013-08-21 06:21:46 PM  

Arkanaut: Voiceofreason01: Because the Japanese are so accepting of outside cultures? Really, that's your explanation?

I also call bullshiat.  If anything, I'd say they're keeping it in the Latin alphabet to maintain the foreign-ness of the car.  Maybe they attach some exoticism to foreign things, but that's not really unique to Japan.


They used to (may still do) that for video games all the time.

'Virtual On'? It sounded cool.
 
2013-08-21 07:08:06 PM  
www.engrish.com
 
2013-08-21 07:08:24 PM  

impaler: I never knew Japanese cars in Japan didn't use Japanese lettering. So no, I've never wondered that.


My stepson bought a right-hand-drive Mitsubishi Evo imported from Japan.  It was quite-literally a "basket-case" when he bought it, as the previous owner had torn it apart and had the whole car repainted before he lost interest in the project.  I had to help him figure out how to reassemble it in the worlds worst 3-D jigsaw puzzle ever.

2 things:  1) Yes, the badges are in English.  Nothing, and I mean NOTHING else is though.   2) Japanese Evo's apparently don't have bumper bars.  There is just a wire mesh frame holding the plastic bumpers in place, although you couldn't have an impact bar in the front anyway with that big-@zz intercooler in the way.

imageshack.us
 
2013-08-21 07:09:52 PM  

downstairs: Voiceofreason01: Because the Japanese are so accepting of outside cultures? Really, that's your explanation?

I read it more of the Japanese associate cars with English-speaking cultures (they were invented there and all)... and its custom to brand such things with that lettering/language.  Kinda interesting.


Yeah that's what I got also...
 
2013-08-21 08:03:29 PM  
As they should, if they don't want to speak the language they should just leave...wait...
 
2013-08-21 08:24:58 PM  
Asian characters for badges would badass on cars.

bringatrailer.com

Anyway, I never got why cars have badges on them anyway. Cars look better without any sort of badges whatsoever.

Not the stupid limited edition badge, not the 4L badge or the V6 badge. Whoever the fark cares how many liters or cylinders your engine has?
 
2013-08-21 08:34:06 PM  
It's probably because once you get past a core 1200 kanji most Japanese can't read Japanese.
 
2013-08-21 08:49:41 PM  

wingnut396: I like the comment:

Next time write why the germans love numbers. I always wondering that.

You know who else liked to use numbers?


His favorite was -6,000,000.
 
2013-08-21 09:38:53 PM  
And here I thought it was because romaji or other western scripts are simple enough they can be recognized from a distance without being oversized.
 
2013-08-21 09:41:20 PM  
 It's because the Japanese respect the origin of things, and honor those origins with the language associated with them

Meanwhile, over in China, they counterfeit cars. Entire cars.

This is a counterfeit BMW X5.

www.amdavidson.com
 
2013-08-21 10:21:18 PM  

LemSkroob: It's because the Japanese respect the origin of things, and honor those origins with the language associated with them

Meanwhile, over in China, they counterfeit cars. Entire cars.

This is a counterfeit BMW X5.

[www.amdavidson.com image 480x640]


You just know that thing would do horribly in a crash test.
 
2013-08-21 10:27:11 PM  

downstairs: I read it more of the Japanese associate cars with English-speaking cultures (they were invented there and all)... and its custom to brand such things with that lettering/language.  Kinda interesting.


mjones73: Yeah that's what I got also...


Really you two?

So Carl Benz didn't exist in your world?

What about the Daimler-Maybach consortium?

Ford popularized cars due to his serial assembling factory and the modular Model T which increased the production rate incredibly, but he was far from the inventor of the car. He wasn't even the first American car maker... Those were the Duryeas.
 
2013-08-21 10:33:56 PM  
How many Japanese people can read the Latin alphabet?
 
2013-08-21 11:07:17 PM  

Glitchwerks: Which is why a racing game made in Japan will have 60 different models of a Nissan Skyline, yet only 20 BMWs.  They are so accepting of outside cultures!


Well, to be fair, there really aren't any BMWs worth putting into a game.  Maybe the E30 M3, but that's about it.

/steadfastly ignoring the M1
 
2013-08-22 12:53:13 AM  

Voiceofreason01: Because the Japanese are so accepting of outside cultures? Really, that's your explanation?


The man is obviously well versed in putting a spin on things cuz that's a load of crap.
 
2013-08-22 12:56:04 AM  

jaytkay: How many Japanese people can read the Latin alphabet


Nearly all of them.
 
2013-08-22 01:11:37 AM  

mr0x: Anyway, I never got why cars have badges on them anyway. Cars look better without any sort of badges whatsoever.


Badges?  We don't need no stinking badges.
 
2013-08-22 02:24:21 AM  

DaCricket: jaytkay: How many Japanese people can read the Latin alphabet

Nearly all of them.


Seriously though, as a Westerner, with our 26 character alphabet, I was kind of wondering if East Asians, with their 1000s character writing system, can easily recognize our word symbols in a way we can't with theirs.

Sure, they won't know the words, but will they be able to easily differentiate between different words - as written? I would think learning a lot of symbols for a writing system makes one adept at recognizing other symbols for other writing systems, and therefore yes.

Maybe not though. It's a curiosity of human learning that this article just had me thinking about.
 
2013-08-22 07:03:35 AM  
Fascinating, right?

Not really.
 
2013-08-22 07:33:55 AM  

impaler: DaCricket: jaytkay: How many Japanese people can read the Latin alphabet

Nearly all of them.

Seriously though, as a Westerner, with our 26 character alphabet, I was kind of wondering if East Asians, with their 1000s character writing system, can easily recognize our word symbols in a way we can't with theirs.

Sure, they won't know the words, but will they be able to easily differentiate between different words - as written? I would think learning a lot of symbols for a writing system makes one adept at recognizing other symbols for other writing systems, and therefore yes.

Maybe not though. It's a curiosity of human learning that this article just had me thinking about.



Yah? Well you can just keep wondering, kiddo.
 
2013-08-22 11:23:04 PM  

impaler: DaCricket: jaytkay: How many Japanese people can read the Latin alphabet

Nearly all of them.

Seriously though, as a Westerner, with our 26 character alphabet, I was kind of wondering if East Asians, with their 1000s character writing system, can easily recognize our word symbols in a way we can't with theirs.

Sure, they won't know the words, but will they be able to easily differentiate between different words - as written? I would think learning a lot of symbols for a writing system makes one adept at recognizing other symbols for other writing systems, and therefore yes.

Maybe not though. It's a curiosity of human learning that this article just had me thinking about.


We actually have a 52 character alphabet.  The capital letter "A" looks nothing like the lowercase "a."  You're just so used to the concept that they don't even mentally register as different glyphs to you anymore.

All Japanese have to take English in school, so just about all of them know how to read, write, and speak it to some extent.  Then again, all American kids conceivably have to take some kind of algebra as well.  But how much you remain competent in it after you graduate, let alone your later attitude towards the subject, is going to vary wildly by personal circumstance.
 
2013-08-23 02:29:26 AM  
I am actually proud of FARK for calling out the spin. It is so true that Japan takes foreign loan words for cars. But the opposite is true otherwise.

The car guy says foreign words fit easily into Japanese. Toromierda. Japan's 46 syllables are incredibly sound-poor. Pre-laptop, the "personal computer" was called a "pasucon". Pasu for "pers" and "con" for "com". Baltimore? Boruchimoa. McDonald's? Makudonarudo. Japan loves taking loan words, but mercilessly Japanizes them, opposite what car guy says.
 
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