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(Wired)   What happens when you coat a balloon in layers of paint, pop it, and capture the results with high-speed photography? AWESOMENESS, THAT'S WHAT   (wired.com) divider line 9
    More: Cool, flowers, strata, photography, coats, paints, visual science  
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7486 clicks; posted to Geek » on 21 Aug 2013 at 12:49 PM (34 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-21 11:55:56 AM
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Subby's mom?
 
2013-08-21 12:55:55 PM
You can get the same effect by shooting clowns in the head.
 
2013-08-21 01:00:51 PM
Why do punctured balloons explode rather than deflate or implode?
 
2013-08-21 01:04:26 PM

DirtyDeadGhostofEbenezerCooke: Why do punctured balloons explode rather than deflate or implode?


Depends on where you pierce the balloon-in some cases, they *will* just deflate.

They can't implode because the pressure inside them is much higher than the pressure outside(that's why they're inflated).

They often explode due simply to the surface tension. Imagine pulling really hard in two directions on a piece of paper. Really REALLY hard. Now introduce a small rip.. it's very suddenly, and very quickly, going to tear apart.
 
2013-08-21 01:22:51 PM
Reminds me of a trip I took on mescaline..
 
2013-08-21 01:54:51 PM

DirtyDeadGhostofEbenezerCooke: Why do punctured balloons explode rather than deflate or implode?


Here's my hypothesis, based on zero collected data other than watching ballons pop in slow motion:

1. The puncture weakens the balloon material, which is under stress due the the pressure imbalance inside v outside.
2. The high pressure inside causes the material to tear apart from the puncture point, at the same time the material quickly retracts due to its elasticity. This can cause the material to fly off in one direction or another (like shooting a rubberband from your fingertip).
3. The pressurized air inside expands rapidly.

So the 'explosion' is really only caused by the pressurized gas in the ballon suddenly having an opportunity to expand. The material itself doesn't "explode" outward. It's only moving due to the sudden release of elastic tension converting potential into kinetic energy.
 
2013-08-21 02:18:29 PM
All I know is if you put scotch tape on a balloon and poke a hole in it through the tape with a needle, it won't pop.  Mr. Wizard taught me that.
 
2013-08-21 08:47:03 PM

lostcat: So the 'explosion' is really only caused by the pressurized gas in the ballon suddenly having an opportunity to expand. The material itself doesn't "explode" outward. It's only moving due to the sudden release of elastic tension converting potential into kinetic energy.


You can really see a good example of this here: balloons filled with hydrogen getting popped with a burning prick.

/there's a cream for the burning prick
 
2013-08-22 11:28:41 PM

JayCab: lostcat: So the 'explosion' is really only caused by the pressurized gas in the ballon suddenly having an opportunity to expand. The material itself doesn't "explode" outward. It's only moving due to the sudden release of elastic tension converting potential into kinetic energy.

You can really see a good example of this here: balloons filled with hydrogen getting popped with a burning prick.

/there's a cream for the burning prick


This was pretty cool, thanks for sharing.
 
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