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(Reuters)   Cameron was behind the UK's detention of Miranda. Was the codename for this "Operation Save Beuller"?   (reuters.com) divider line 11
    More: Followup, child custody, GCHQ, Alan Rusbridger, press freedom, Home Secretary, Glenn Greenwald  
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2859 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Aug 2013 at 9:45 AM (46 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-21 02:19:32 PM
2 votes:

Evil High Priest: BullBearMS: Vaneshi: You have the right to remain silent but anything you later rely on in court may be used against you.

If we are interested in this particular case, under the extraordinary powers misused against him he had no right to remain silent, access to an attorney, or access to officials from his nation's consulate.

He was not even given access to a translator so he could speak in his native Portuguese and be sure that he even understood the questions properly.

Well, sure. Because terrorism.


Because journalism, apparently.

Just as in the US, where the author of the Patriot Act has stepped forward to say that it is a complete lie when Obama claims the law enables what has been done with it, the guy behind Britain's Terror Act has stepped forward to cry bullshiat.

The Metropolitan police had no legal basis to detain David Miranda under the Terrorism Act 2000, Tony Blair's former lord chancellor has claimed.

Lord Falconer of Thoroton, who helped introduce the bill in the House of Lords, said that the act makes clear that police can only detain someone to assess whether they are involved in the commission, preparation or instigation of terrorism.

Falconer told the Guardian: "I am very clear that this does not apply, either on its terms or in its spirit, to Mr Miranda."
2013-08-21 12:16:42 PM
2 votes:
For me, the targeting of Miranda as a way to send a message is the most disturbing part of this whole Snowden affair. Targeting the family members of journalists is the kind of thing that I'd always been told was what Soviet-style totalitarian police states did. I can see a case for the NSA surveillance--not that I buy the argument, but when we reach the point of threatening the family members of the person reporting on the surveillance, there is no justification that can be made.
2013-08-21 08:26:26 AM
2 votes:
image.spreadshirt.com
2013-08-21 01:45:18 PM
1 votes:

Vaneshi: You have the right to remain silent but anything you later rely on in court may be used against you.


If we are interested in this particular case, under the extraordinary powers misused against him he had no right to remain silent, access to an attorney, or access to officials from his nation's consulate.

He was not even given access to a translator so he could speak in his native Portuguese and be sure that he even understood the questions properly.
2013-08-21 01:03:55 PM
1 votes:
Snowdon is not guilty of espionage. Espionage is when you spy for a hostile power or agency. It's like insider trading--the hostile power and agency benefits from inside information.

The pages of the Guardian are insufficiently private to constitute grounds for a charge of espionage.

Snowdon is a whistle-blower. There is no evidence of animus against his employers--ultimately, you.

Spies don't give the general public government information that ostensibly belongs to them any way. They sell it.

Snowdon is not a spy. He is a benefactor of the American people and the rest of us, even if his information is somewhat stale to anybody remotely intelligent or a "conspiracy theorist".

In this case, conspiracy theorist must be used in the original sense of somebody who believes what the leakers and whistle-blowers are telling us rather than the cover stories of the Government agencies implicated in wrong-doing. The term was invented to discredit people who didn't buy into the Warren Commission Report. In other words, nearly everybody except hardcore right-wing Republican stooges.

There are "conspiracy theorists" in both senses of the word, but it is not always easy to distinguish between them. Nonetheless, some "conspiracy theories" are in the highly probable category, while others are so dumb they might be cover stories concocted by Government agencies deep in the muddy-wuddy.
2013-08-21 11:49:53 AM
1 votes:

farkingatwork: They didn't even tell him he had the right to remain silent?


On a schedule seven detention, he doesn't. he doesn't have the right to a lawyer, and he can be charged if he doesn't answer questions or provide the passwords to all electronic media he owns. Guaranteed in the nine hours MI5 accessed every single piece of information he has access to, including the newspaper's, as he likely has access to Guardian servers.

Britain really is becoming a police state.
2013-08-21 11:27:41 AM
1 votes:

vpb: 21-7-b: Again, I don't know, but I wouldn't be surprised if there was a team coordinating an ongoing casefile seeking to address (what is) a breach of security - in fact I'd very strongly, to the point of certainty, assume there is more than one such team globally

Of course there is.  I don't know who is responsible, but espionage and leaks are nothing new.  There is certainly some procedure for coordinating a response between countries.




I remember when such talk was honest to goodness, straight up tinfoil hat territory.
2013-08-21 10:47:48 AM
1 votes:

d23: [s11.postimg.org image 640x399]


He didn't lie.  I'm pretty sure the wholesale destruction of the NHS and a mad dash to sell privatisation to the public doesn't count as "cut".   It's more "vicious stabbing to death and pissing on the corpse".   I honestly don't think there is a group of the general public that cnut hasn't managed to piss off to some degree.

Which whilst not the expected outcome is and of itself actually quite impressive I don't think even nuLabour managed it in all those years.

/Maggie would be proud of him.
2013-08-21 09:58:00 AM
1 votes:
Can't wait to here "I'm not a crook!" with a brit accent.

www.voraciousrationalist.com
2013-08-21 09:36:47 AM
1 votes:
Only David Cameron could think that seizing a hard drive at the Guardian would stop the leaking, so this makes perfect sense.
2013-08-21 09:25:44 AM
1 votes:
Was he ever read his rights?
 
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