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(AOL)   Ever wonder what really goes on behind the scenes in some businesses? Maybe you're better off not knowing   (jobs.aol.com) divider line 97
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13482 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Aug 2013 at 12:38 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-21 12:10:54 AM
These aren't scandalous though, this is just how you make business work:

Catering
Via Reddit user bananabilector:

"When you order catering, we know we can't trust you to have your guest count right, so the kitchen massively over produces for your event. The staff then eats their shift meal from your order and the rest gets tossed. Sometimes it's only a little, sometimes it's 200 plated mains or 15 hotel pans full of potatoes and green beans. And at $13-35/plate depending on the menu, we still come out on top."

Fine dining
Via Reddit user SG804:

"Fine dining cook here. 30% of your meal is butter. That's why it's so good."
 
2013-08-21 12:14:37 AM
Fine dining
Via Reddit user SG804:

"Fine dining cook here. 30% of your meal is butter. That's why it's so good."


You sound fat.
 
2013-08-21 12:18:08 AM
Fine dining
Via Reddit user SG804:

"Fine dining cook here. 30% of your meal is butter. That's why it's so good."


No, not in a million years. Unless you consider Applebees fine dining.  At least where I live, they take their shiat seriously.  Now... what you pay for it may be up for debate.  But saying its 30% butter... you're clearly not in fine dining and never have been.  I don't think I've ever heard something so absurd.
 
2013-08-21 12:25:10 AM
Delivery
Via Reddit user JamesW89:
"I work for a UPS store. Here is a few things I have learned since working here...
 Writing fragile on your package means nothing.
 Your package WILL get thrown around, dropped, and beaten up; if it is breakable then according to our guidelines for properly packaged items it needs to withstand 1000lbs of pressure and a 4ft drop.
 UPS capital claims is terrible as well they will do whatever they can to not pay you the amount you insure your package for."


A few things with this, mostly anecdotal.  My UPS guy is very respectful, even as far as putting a plastic bag over our delivery if he has to throw it over the fence in the rain.

But most importantly, you're on the hook for how you package the stuff you send.  My mother in law sent us a bunch of dishes and assorted kitchen stuff.  She stuffed it in a box with no care for how it might travel.  Hint: if you're sending a bunch of porcelain dishes, buy a shiatton of bubble wrap.  Its on you, not UPS.
 
2013-08-21 12:44:35 AM
nothing wrong with the fine dining--i must do it myself

i love butter
 
2013-08-21 12:45:13 AM
Reddit: Your Source for News, So We Don't Have to Subscribe to the AP Wire.
 
2013-08-21 12:52:44 AM
I was not, in the least, surprised at the ageism in the tech industry.
 
2013-08-21 12:53:57 AM
AOL is still around?

farm5.staticflickr.com
 
2013-08-21 01:00:36 AM

Rand's lacy underwear: "Fine dining cook here. 30% of your meal is butter. That's why it's so good."


This. Most of the steaks you get when you dine out get a butter-bath before it hits your plate.

"oooh, so juicy!"
 
2013-08-21 01:01:45 AM
www.comicbase.com

"shall not be sold or distributed with any part of its cover or markings removed"

As a kid I got about a gazillion comics from garage sales with the top third of the cover removed. Cheap.
 
2013-08-21 01:18:27 AM
I'm always torn between wanting to see the kitchen and not wanting to see the kitchen.
 
2013-08-21 01:23:59 AM
When I was a teenager a local book store went out of business. I got a metric asston of books without covers from the dumpster. Don't need the cover to read them and I didn't have the cash to buy all those books. It was great.
 
2013-08-21 01:25:33 AM
I'm an IT contractor... Very few craptastic business practices surprise me anymore.

Fun one that I saw firsthand... During the defense boom of the 80's, electronic part distributors would sell say, $1 million worth of parts, then programs would get cancelled or changed, so the purchaser would return the parts.

The salesman who sold them would gladly take them back to keep the customer happy (and why not, they already made their commission) and $1 million worth of parts would go straight into the dumpster. There was enough padding in the system to make this a viable business model.
 
2013-08-21 01:37:03 AM
Your package WILL get thrown around, dropped, and beaten up; if it is breakable then according to our guidelines for properly packaged items it needs to withstand 1000lbs of pressure and a 4ft drop.

No wonder this guy never got fired after delivering my package.

instart3.flixster.com
/Even stranger is that he left a toy dog at the foot of my door when he left
//I am never using HDS again
 
2013-08-21 01:38:12 AM
The hotel thing is true, at least for the one I worked at (Comfort Inn, San Marcos, TX).  I couldn't go below a certain amount even if it was 2AM and I was only at half capacity.  But I certainly didn't offer that amount first either.  It's not like I got commission though so if you even slightly questioned it I'd shave ten bucks off.
 
2013-08-21 01:39:35 AM

Dialectic: I was not, in the least, surprised at the ageism in the tech industry.


You shouldn't have told them you wrote your thesis on FORTRAN.
 
2013-08-21 01:39:51 AM
I wonder how many people who posted these revelations will soon find themselves out of a job.
 
2013-08-21 01:51:44 AM
I suggest not ordering the clam chowder in restaurants.
 
2013-08-21 02:33:51 AM
I worked for Airborne Express between 1985 and 1995 as a driver/manager.

We were in a big struggle with Fedex and UPS. I consider most of the decade I was there as living hell.

They hired subcontractors to deliver the areas, usually consisting of 2 or 3 cities. The contractors bid on the site. Then they had to buy the vans, have them painted in Airborne colors, apply stickers, be responsible for all maintenance, hire the drivers, buy the commercial insurance and often ran routes until they got enough staff where they could stop.

However, they had to follow Airborne rules, including keeping the vans in nearly pristine shape. All dents and scratches had to be fixed within days. The Company provided the uniforms. They shipped the freight down, at first, in a van that the subcontractor drove 45 miles to get and 45 miles to bring back. We met in a parking lot. At night, after running a route, usually over 150 miles, the subcontractor had to collect the outgoing freight by a certain time and drive it 45 miles back to the main base to deposit it on an Airborne Express jet. Then, he could go home.

Airborne moved us into an abandoned gas station -- except we couldn't use the buildings. Later, we were sent to the next city and took over an abandoned Fedex station. They decided to fly the freight in, so we were moved to what was left of a flight training center hanger/office, which was one stage away from being condemned.

The freight came in on small aircraft, like a Piper. The biggest one was a Beach Craft. I once had to jump start the twin engine Beach Craft with my own truck using a couple of jumper cables joined together. A different, smaller aircraft used to come in with one engine pouring out so much oil that the pilot had to clean the wing and top it off.

Airborne hired in different aircraft subcontractors. One flying a smaller twin engine plane lost part of his engine along the way and didn't notice until he landed.

We went through something like 6 different aircraft subcontractors.

We'd haul freight valued in the hundreds of thousands of dollars, and, on Saturday, store the Monday freight in a locked room with absolutely no security that a kid with a hammer could get in.

Drivers were pushed constantly for speed and harassed. We had short wave radios then, so you got to listen to the home base chewing out drivers for whatever errors they might have made. That included me, the manager. I was responsible for everything. So I got chewed out for others errors, plus I had to run a route and run the station.

That kinda undermined my authority.

When a subcontractor started making good money, after working his arse off, Airborne found reasons to change his contract, so he made less profit but delivered more freight. If he fussed too much, they put his contract up for bids and hired in a new one. He wound up having to eat the cost of the vans, had to pay his drivers, and the new guy coming in would usually keep the current staff, but reduce their pay. None ever raised it.

We were taught to lie on our manifests to make it look like we were doing better than we were, but if we got caught, it was all our fault. Even when we moved into computers, we were taught how to rig the scanners to report false times.

In my area, we went through over 100 drivers. The pressure was too hard. Most tried to get in with Fedex, until Airborne made a deal with them to not hire each others drivers for one year after they quit. Accidents were so frequent that we had to have a repair shop selected to constantly fix the vans.

One subcontractor bought us the Ford Cargo Van, which was the biggest piece of shiat ever. The front end never stayed in alignment, which tore up tires. We were forever going into the shop to get it aligned until the subcontractor biatched. Then we stopped -- and shredded tires until the sub contractor threatened to take the new tires out of our pay. So we rotated the tires, until he biatched about the expense and down time.

Any damage done to the vans that you could not prove you did not do, came out of your pay. We had to work half a day on Saturdays, and he cut our pay. You were pushed until you failed, and pushed even more before Airborne would agree to allowing another route to be made and another driver hired.

If you got a speeding ticket, you had to pay for it and pay for the class to get it off your record -- about $150 on top of the fine. If not, then the subcontractor would fire you because his insurance carrier would up his rates. Yet you had to speed to get done on time.

See, Fedex and UPS had delivery drivers, and they had other drivers who would start making customer pickups as the delivery driver was still working. We had to deliver and then pickup. We wound up back tracking a lot.

There were no exceptions for loss of time due to traffic and most weather. A driver got stuck on a muddy road after a major storm and I got biatched out because I allowed him to be towed out. My boss wanted him to have to pay the tow charge. He also wanted me, after delivering my route, to run 35 miles down and get his freight and finish his route in the two hours we had left, and if I missed the outgoing freight, I had to drive 40 miles to the main base in time to meet the jet.

One day I drove 350 miles. Most of it with my foot in the carburetor.

Drivers from time to time, would just dump freight instead of driving 20 miles one way to deliver a package which did not require a signature. They'd claim they left it at the door, when they actually tossed it in a ditch. I had to investigate.

The cute part was, if you angered Airborne, they could not fire you. You worked for the subcontractor. However, you could be banned from being on Airborne property or handling Airborne freight, which eliminated the subcontractor's need for you. He'd have no option but to let you go.

The kicker was, you could not collect unemployment benefits. Airborne was not your employer so was not responsible. Your subcontractor was not responsible since his employer, Airborne, had forbid you to handle any freight.

You got zilch.

You could also get in trouble for being nice to drivers of the other courier companies. We ignored that because, as a rule, they were nice to us and helpful. I once spent about 3/4 of an hour trying to get a Fedex truck unstuck from a construction site (they used special, re-groovable tires to save costs but they sucked for traction). Had my boss found out, I could have been fired.

Freight was not handled well by pi$$ed off, harassed drivers. Sometimes packages were tossed over gates, marked LAFD (left at front door) for the customer to find a few days later. Like, after a rain storm. Some were so badly handled that we could hear broken glass rattle inside. Some drivers thought it funny to slip a piece of their freight into someone else's truck -- knowing that we had a rule if you wound up with the wrong freight, you had to deliver it anyhow or at least drive miles out of your way to meet the proper driver and turn it over to him. Some snuck freight off your truck before you scanned it in, and you'd get harassed as the Company demanded to know where the package was.

The next day, it would 'appear' mysteriously as you loaded your trucks.

The a/c's on the vans mainly burned out within the first year. In Florida summers, you need a/c. The subcontractor biatched so much about the cost to have them replaced that I bought the blowers with petty cash and installed them myself on my own time.

The subcontractor figured that since I was manager, I was expected to do that with no pay.

I had one delivery that was 10 miles away from my area. I blasted down the highway to reach it -- a big citrus grove. Then I had to drive 5 miles down a crappy dirt road that turned into slush in the rain to get to the offices. I took that dirt road at 80 mph. During the rainy season, the van sunk into the mud up to the hub caps. It would delay me up to 30 minutes and I'd get biatched at for such a long gap in my manifest.

In 10 years I paid several hundred dollars in tickets, had 7 accidents -- two of which knocked me off the road, had to pay for two mysterious dents in my van to the tune of $500. (My boss agreed to reimburse me half of one if I got it fixed at my own cost before a company inspection. I did and he didn't.)

You couldn't drink the tap water at the station because it was foul. The back rooms, unused, leaked like a waterfall with every major rain storm. Water poured out of the active electrical sockets.

Because the Company was so cheap with petty cash, I wound up going into the rotten section and snatching fluorescent light tubes to replace those in our office that burned out.

During my time there I went through three subcontractors.

We got bonuses for nearly dying out there -- but never more than $100.

Airborne Express went belly up a couple of years after I left. DHL took over and proved no better with employees than Airborne. Worse, really. They required their drivers to drive vans with no a/c to save gas.

One previous subcontractor out of Conyers, Georgia, took the area from a nice subcontractor by being an ex-Airborne executive and having pull enough to find out the subcontractors bid when the contract came up for renewal. He under bid by one cent and got the contract. (One cent per package.) He sent down his own manager, reduced me to assistant manager and I discovered that the new manager was a bipolar depressive, who had deliberately gone off his medication which made him erratic and hard to work with.

Oh, yeah. The District Manager in Orlando was caught stealing computers off the big rig that delivered freight to the station (before they got in the jet). He made a deal with the driver and sold them on the side.

I'm in no hurry to be a courier again.
 
2013-08-21 02:34:05 AM

rustypouch: I suggest not ordering the clam chowder in restaurants.


I'm currently involved in a class action suit involving the chowder to urine ratio of the soup of a restaurant I used to work at so I'm getting a kick out of your reply.

Tyler D.
 
2013-08-21 02:53:13 AM
Former satellite TV installer here.  Couple good behind the scenes stories.

That free install you are being offered is worth exactly what you pay for.  We were told not to install wall boxes, outside covers, or anything.  Use the most direct route to get coax from set top box to dish.  Drill straight down through floors, or straight out of an exterior wall.  Leave minimum amounts of slack, and tack down cable tightly (we want you calling us if you rearrange your house, and the cable can't reach the TV). Existing cable, we won't use it. If you want the install to actually look good, prepare to cough up $$$.

"Highly trained technicians" means "Highly taught to upsell".  During my training course, we spend 1 day on how the system works, 3 days on safety, and the rest of the week and a half on sales techniques.  Our performance metrics are based, in part, on upgrades to existing customers.

Sat techs will fiddle with your TV, unless you are ordering a premium package with a premium set top box.  Order a cheap HD box, we won't turn on the HD signal.  Still have SD TVs, we'll mess with the picture to encourage you to go buy a HDTV.  See above performance metrics.
 
2013-08-21 03:13:47 AM

Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: I'm always torn between wanting to see the kitchen and not wanting to see the kitchen.


You never want to see the kitchen.

Not that they're dirty or filthy by any means....but they're not nearly as clean as the average person believes. Think how dirty your own kitchen gets when you make a meal, then multiply that by 70. That's the average "fine dining kitchen." They don't get a deep-cleaning but once a month, when the thing is completely shut down.

/used to be security in a casino.
//also medial officer
///slashies from the knife injuries
 
2013-08-21 03:27:31 AM

brimed03: Reddit: Your Source for News, So We Don't Have to Subscribe to the AP Wire.


Exactly. So now "journalism" (and i'm am using the term veeeeery loosely here) means we troll stories from public web forums, all written by unverified and anonymous people.

Sometimes I can't believe I actually read "some of these stories should be taken with a grain of salt..."

Awesome work AOL, still completely irrelevant and it still doesn't know it.
 
2013-08-21 03:32:36 AM

ReverendJimBobHammer: rustypouch: I suggest not ordering the clam chowder in restaurants.

I'm currently involved in a class action suit involving the chowder to urine ratio of the soup of a restaurant I used to work at so I'm getting a kick out of your reply.

Tyler D.


Okay, so I've always wondered about this. You hear all sorts of horror stories about the bodily fluids or other awful things that could be in things you order, anywhere from fine dining to McDonalds, and it's definitely scary. And, of course, that movie Waiting. But, then, on the other hand, I've heard that this happens a LOT less often than people think it does, or than wait staff likes to insinuate it does (and it makes sense that they would like this, given the fact that it understandably is one of the few cards up their sleeves that they have against arrogant, abusive customers). The lowdown that I got is that most managers want to make their ways up in the world and don't stand for this, so it happens a lot less often than the scared public might surmise. What's the truth? Anyone know? My best guess is that it varies so significantly from restaurant to restaurant and manager to manager that there's probably no way to really know.

/Worked at McDonald's from age 15-16.
/Was only a cashier because too young to handle the fryer, so didn't go back into the back too often, but never saw or heard anything amiss.
 
2013-08-21 03:40:22 AM
Did they get any Taco Bell employees on there?

Apparently the "meat" comes in plastic bags that are heated up using hot water,  sometimes the bags break open,  and they don't stop to clean it out or drain it.

/thats what an employee told me,  she refused to eat anything from there.
//I don't care,  I still eat it.
///floating fake meat
 
2013-08-21 03:45:46 AM

Boo_Guy: Did they get any Taco Bell employees on there?

Apparently the "meat" comes in plastic bags that are heated up using hot water,  sometimes the bags break open,  and they don't stop to clean it out or drain it.

/thats what an employee told me,  she refused to eat anything from there.
//I don't care,  I still eat it.
///floating fake meat


This is very true.  All of the meats, sauces, etc. come in big bags and we boiled 'em for a few minutes in this industrial sized boiler.  If they come open, oh well.  The water is boiling though, so it must kill about everything.  I seem to recall that being cleaned out frequently.  The fryer on the other hand, not so much.
 
2013-08-21 03:45:52 AM

downstairs: Delivery
Via Reddit user JamesW89:
"I work for a UPS store. Here is a few things I have learned since working here...
 Writing fragile on your package means nothing.
 Your package WILL get thrown around, dropped, and beaten up; if it is breakable then according to our guidelines for properly packaged items it needs to withstand 1000lbs of pressure and a 4ft drop.
 UPS capital claims is terrible as well they will do whatever they can to not pay you the amount you insure your package for."

A few things with this, mostly anecdotal.  My UPS guy is very respectful, even as far as putting a plastic bag over our delivery if he has to throw it over the fence in the rain.

But most importantly, you're on the hook for how you package the stuff you send.  My mother in law sent us a bunch of dishes and assorted kitchen stuff.  She stuffed it in a box with no care for how it might travel.  Hint: if you're sending a bunch of porcelain dishes, buy a shiatton of bubble wrap.  Its on you, not UPS.


I'm fairly certain my local UPS guys are fine, especially since my neighbor runs the local office. The distribution centers, however... well let's just say that I'm pretty sure my first video card's shipping box was not damaged by Newegg, but somewhere along the way. Fortunately they honored the defective item for exchange, but overall the whole shebang cost me about $15 what with return shipping, no way to recoup that that I could find.... and another $10 shipping for the hard drive I had to return a week later.

/sigh
 
2013-08-21 03:48:42 AM
I'm Boo Berry and other crap because my things around don't won't work, so SURLY fark will! I think so!
 
2013-08-21 03:50:04 AM
This story coming from AOL? lol

/My inter-web-tubes are almost expired. I need another CD.
 
2013-08-21 03:51:57 AM
Boo_Guy, the "floating fake meat" is completely true. The meat comes frozen and flat-packed in boxes; cooks take it out and put it in a huge vat of boiling water called the "rethermalizer" (not kidding). Anything that needs heating up goes in the rethermalizer-- meat, sauce, nacho cheese, you name it. When it's done heating, they take out the bag, cut it open, and dump it into a warming pan.

The beans are also made out of a brown powder + hot water.

/Taco Bell employee for a year
/WORST place I ever worked
 
2013-08-21 04:00:25 AM

gadian: Boo_Guy: Did they get any Taco Bell employees on there?

Apparently the "meat" comes in plastic bags that are heated up using hot water,  sometimes the bags break open,  and they don't stop to clean it out or drain it.

/thats what an employee told me,  she refused to eat anything from there.
//I don't care,  I still eat it.
///floating fake meat

This is very true.  All of the meats, sauces, etc. come in big bags and we boiled 'em for a few minutes in this industrial sized boiler.  If they come open, oh well.  The water is boiling though, so it must kill about everything.  I seem to recall that being cleaned out frequently.  The fryer on the other hand, not so much.


The taco bell in my town was a shiatty old one,  I don't think anything was clean in it anymore.
When standing in line my legs would slowly spread out because the floor was so greasy it made it slippery.  You'd have to readjust and stand back up every other minute.

It closed up and they knocked the whole building down at the start of this summer to put a brand new one in its place.
 
2013-08-21 04:54:37 AM
I worked in a Methodist church as a handyman for a while after I retired from Corporate Hell.
The backstabbing, skullduggery and gossiping there would rival or better any Fortune 500 company head office.
 
2013-08-21 05:08:31 AM

Ranger Rover: ReverendJimBobHammer: rustypouch: I suggest not ordering the clam chowder in restaurants.

I'm currently involved in a class action suit involving the chowder to urine ratio of the soup of a restaurant I used to work at so I'm getting a kick out of your reply.

Tyler D.

Okay, so I've always wondered about this. You hear all sorts of horror stories about the bodily fluids or other awful things that could be in things you order, anywhere from fine dining to McDonalds, and it's definitely scary. And, of course, that movie Waiting. But, then, on the other hand, I've heard that this happens a LOT less often than people think it does, or than wait staff likes to insinuate it does (and it makes sense that they would like this, given the fact that it understandably is one of the few cards up their sleeves that they have against arrogant, abusive customers). The lowdown that I got is that most managers want to make their ways up in the world and don't stand for this, so it happens a lot less often than the scared public might surmise. What's the truth? Anyone know? My best guess is that it varies so significantly from restaurant to restaurant and manager to manager that there's probably no way to really know.

/Worked at McDonald's from age 15-16.
/Was only a cashier because too young to handle the fryer, so didn't go back into the back too often, but never saw or heard anything amiss.


There's always that one asshole that thinks it's funny.
 
2013-08-21 05:47:12 AM

gadian: Boo_Guy: Did they get any Taco Bell employees on there?

Apparently the "meat" comes in plastic bags that are heated up using hot water,  sometimes the bags break open,  and they don't stop to clean it out or drain it.

/thats what an employee told me,  she refused to eat anything from there.
//I don't care,  I still eat it.
///floating fake meat

This is very true.  All of the meats, sauces, etc. come in big bags and we boiled 'em for a few minutes in this industrial sized boiler.  If they come open, oh well.  The water is boiling though, so it must kill about everything.  I seem to recall that being cleaned out frequently.  The fryer on the other hand, not so much.


The Taco Bell in Juneau got closed down by the health inspector a few years ago. It was pretty nasty. We seem to have a hard time with fast food places. Only McDonalds and Dominoes Pizza seem to even try to pass health inspections. The KFC was so bad that the health inspector didn't even issue a warning. He just told the customers to leave and had the business shut down on the spot. I know the guy and he still refuses to tell me how bad it was.
 
2013-08-21 05:47:22 AM

Forsythe P. Jones: I worked in a Methodist church as a handyman for a while after I retired from Corporate Hell.
The backstabbing, skullduggery and gossiping there would rival or better any Fortune 500 company head office.


Goes on in EVERY church.  While doing some freelance work, I got an education in the definition of hypocrisy.  The amount of stuff I hear is mind-numbing.  But it is fun to watch how fast some people can get their church faces on when the subject of the current discussion walks in.  The number of people I can admire for living their beliefs, even when inconvenient, is now less than ten.
 
wee [TotalFark]
2013-08-21 05:53:44 AM

phrawgh: This story coming from AOL?


No.  It came from another, more dynamic, website where people submit things.  Fark just linked to the site that linked to the original in order to stay somewhat relevant, rather than link to the original site itself. Might be an ad revenue, traffic sharing deal with AOL. Who knows.  Would be kind weird if Fark linked directly to Reddit, though.  Amusing, actually. Like admitting defeat, or there abouts.

Hey, at least it's not another banal cracked.com "Top 7" paid-for link masquerading as an actual submission...
 
2013-08-21 06:10:13 AM

Forsythe P. Jones: I worked in a Methodist church as a handyman for a while after I retired from Corporate Hell.
The backstabbing, skullduggery and gossiping there would rival or better any Fortune 500 company head office.


Because religion is a business.
 
2013-08-21 06:19:45 AM
Oh, another excuse for my CSB at McDonald's!

So, Louise Ogden, the girl who was fooled into taking off her clothes (and thensome) in a Manager's office at McDonald's by some creepy guy over the phone pretending to be a cop? I worked with her, and was there the day it happened.

Nobody really knew what was going on. Our supervisor kept popping in and out of the office for very brief periods, and there was paper taped to the inside of the door window so nobody could see inside. We knew something was fishy, but didn't really get the entire story until it broke on the news some time later. The rest was rumors (which turned out to be mostly true). Still, I didn't know every detail until well after I graduated High School in '04.

shiatty job, worked there for just under 2 years. But hey, that's first jobs for you. Obviously an industry standard at McDonald's. Probably happens all the time.

tl;dr: I was cooking hamburgers at McDonald's while some girl was getting worked in the office by some perverts

/CSB
 
2013-08-21 06:25:05 AM

sharphead: brimed03: Reddit: Your Source for News, So We Don't Have to Subscribe to the AP Wire.

Exactly. So now "journalism" (and i'm am using the term veeeeery loosely here) means we troll stories from public web forums, all written by unverified and anonymous people.

Sometimes I can't believe I actually read "some of these stories should be taken with a grain of salt..."

Awesome work AOL, still completely irrelevant and it still doesn't know it.


Ya well that's what people like: Clearly an anonymous story from some dipshiat at reddit MUST be true, and totally not people making up shiat to make themselves look important or push their personal politics!

Some of them are just retarded, like the "Catering makes money on your event," shiat. No, really? I never would have guessed! I thought it was a charity and they were losing money. How dare they make a profit so they can stay in business! Others are clearly written by low level morons that have no idea what they are talking about. For example bandwidth IS a scare commodity. Bits are, but bandwidth is. There's only so much on a given system at given levels and it isn't something you can just build out easily/cheaply if you feel like.

The farming one is by far the funniest: "Oh noes, you'll die from eating the nasty stuff on your food! You need to wait WEEKS before eating something and wash it to death or you'll DIE!!!" Ya... Which is why so many people die a year from it. Oh wait, I mean none.

I find that in basically all cases these "behind the scenes" things online are completely farking stupid. The people either post shiat that you knew anyhow like it is some big deal, don't know what they are talking about, or exaggerate/flat out make up shiat to try and sound cool.
 
2013-08-21 06:25:36 AM
Internet service providers
"Fiber Internet Service Provider here - bandwidth is not a scarce commodity like they want you to think it is. It is all about profit margins and over subscribing the network."

User bigdonkey adds: "Most of the bottlenecks are the result of the ISPs not building out their local networks to meet demand."

Neither of these things are secret.
 
2013-08-21 06:31:24 AM

Ranger Rover: ReverendJimBobHammer: rustypouch: I suggest not ordering the clam chowder in restaurants.

I'm currently involved in a class action suit involving the chowder to urine ratio of the soup of a restaurant I used to work at so I'm getting a kick out of your reply.

Tyler D.

Okay, so I've always wondered about this. You hear all sorts of horror stories about the bodily fluids or other awful things that could be in things you order, anywhere from fine dining to McDonalds, and it's definitely scary. And, of course, that movie Waiting. But, then, on the other hand, I've heard that this happens a LOT less often than people think it does, or than wait staff likes to insinuate it does (and it makes sense that they would like this, given the fact that it understandably is one of the few cards up their sleeves that they have against arrogant, abusive customers). The lowdown that I got is that most managers want to make their ways up in the world and don't stand for this, so it happens a lot less often than the scared public might surmise. What's the truth? Anyone know? My best guess is that it varies so significantly from restaurant to restaurant and manager to manager that there's probably no way to really know.

/Worked at McDonald's from age 15-16.
/Was only a cashier because too young to handle the fryer, so didn't go back into the back too often, but never saw or heard anything amiss.


That was a line from the movie (or novel or both, I can't remember) "Fight Club" not a real life example. I've worked in a few restaurants and I've never seen or heard of purposely adulterated food going out. Oh sure we dropped shiat on the floor, picked it up and dropped it straight back on the plate and sent THAT out but we never actually farked with the customer's food or drink.
 
2013-08-21 06:36:22 AM

DanZero: Fine dining
Via Reddit user SG804:

"Fine dining cook here. 30% of your meal is butter. That's why it's so good."

You sound fat.


Restaurant food is full of FAT. I would not dare eat like this every day.

Just look at Ramsey's breakfast!

http://youtu.be/PUP7U5vTMM0
 
2013-08-21 06:37:58 AM

ReverendJimBobHammer: Ranger Rover: ReverendJimBobHammer: rustypouch: I suggest not ordering the clam chowder in restaurants.

I'm currently involved in a class action suit involving the chowder to urine ratio of the soup of a restaurant I used to work at so I'm getting a kick out of your reply.

Tyler D.

Okay, so I've always wondered about this. You hear all sorts of horror stories about the bodily fluids or other awful things that could be in things you order, anywhere from fine dining to McDonalds, and it's definitely scary. And, of course, that movie Waiting. But, then, on the other hand, I've heard that this happens a LOT less often than people think it does, or than wait staff likes to insinuate it does (and it makes sense that they would like this, given the fact that it understandably is one of the few cards up their sleeves that they have against arrogant, abusive customers). The lowdown that I got is that most managers want to make their ways up in the world and don't stand for this, so it happens a lot less often than the scared public might surmise. What's the truth? Anyone know? My best guess is that it varies so significantly from restaurant to restaurant and manager to manager that there's probably no way to really know.

/Worked at McDonald's from age 15-16.
/Was only a cashier because too young to handle the fryer, so didn't go back into the back too often, but never saw or heard anything amiss.

That was a line from the movie (or novel or both, I can't remember) "Fight Club" not a real life example. I've worked in a few restaurants and I've never seen or heard of purposely adulterated food going out. Oh sure we dropped shiat on the floor, picked it up and dropped it straight back on the plate and sent THAT out but we never actually farked with the customer's food or drink.


I'm pretty sure most of that is incredibly rare. I never saw any of that during my brief stint with fast food. Honestly, at least while I was working, anything that fell on the floor got thrown away because picking it back up would be dirtier and more inconvenient.

The most nefarious deed I ever witnessed was somebody dumping 10 squirts from the mayo gun onto a chicken patty when a rude customer at the drive-thru asked for "extra extra extra mayo".
 
2013-08-21 06:45:36 AM
I don't understand the book thing.  Throwing them away and losing the revenue you would if you sold them is the same as giving them away to someone/place that would put them to actual use.  So why throw them away?  Box them up and donate them.  Either way you're rid of them but at least this way they're being put to good use.
 
2013-08-21 06:52:36 AM

Gene Masseth Jr.: I don't understand the book thing.  Throwing them away and losing the revenue you would if you sold them is the same as giving them away to someone/place that would put them to actual use.  So why throw them away?  Box them up and donate them.  Either way you're rid of them but at least this way they're being put to good use.


They aren't losing money on them by throwing them away. They are removing the covers and returning them to the publisher, the publisher reimburses them for each cover they return them.
 
2013-08-21 07:07:41 AM

Gene Masseth Jr.: I don't understand the book thing.  Throwing them away and losing the revenue you would if you sold them is the same as giving them away to someone/place that would put them to actual use.  So why throw them away?  Box them up and donate them.  Either way you're rid of them but at least this way they're being put to good use.


"Those got dam libruls aren't going to get anything free from US I tell ya. They want stuff, they can just yank on those little boot straps until they gots some money to give us."
 
2013-08-21 07:09:28 AM
First day of every retail job I've ever had: "What did you say your name was? Here's a badge. Put that on, get out there and sell; we can do the paperwork later."
 
2013-08-21 07:27:45 AM
I prefer to assume all companies are lying cocksuckers about their product or services, until I discover otherwise.
 
2013-08-21 07:35:43 AM

ReverendJimBobHammer: Ranger Rover: ReverendJimBobHammer: rustypouch: I suggest not ordering the clam chowder in restaurants.

I'm currently involved in a class action suit involving the chowder to urine ratio of the soup of a restaurant I used to work at so I'm getting a kick out of your reply.

Tyler D.

Okay, so I've always wondered about this. You hear all sorts of horror stories about the bodily fluids or other awful things that could be in things you order, anywhere from fine dining to McDonalds, and it's definitely scary. And, of course, that movie Waiting. But, then, on the other hand, I've heard that this happens a LOT less often than people think it does, or than wait staff likes to insinuate it does (and it makes sense that they would like this, given the fact that it understandably is one of the few cards up their sleeves that they have against arrogant, abusive customers). The lowdown that I got is that most managers want to make their ways up in the world and don't stand for this, so it happens a lot less often than the scared public might surmise. What's the truth? Anyone know? My best guess is that it varies so significantly from restaurant to restaurant and manager to manager that there's probably no way to really know.

/Worked at McDonald's from age 15-16.
/Was only a cashier because too young to handle the fryer, so didn't go back into the back too often, but never saw or heard anything amiss.

That was a line from the movie (or novel or both, I can't remember) "Fight Club" not a real life example. I've worked in a few restaurants and I've never seen or heard of purposely adulterated food going out. Oh sure we dropped shiat on the floor, picked it up and dropped it straight back on the plate and sent THAT out but we never actually farked with the customer's food or drink.


What you describe is exactly what you claim to have never done...
 
2013-08-21 07:49:28 AM

wee: phrawgh: This story coming from AOL?

No.  It came from another, more dynamic, website where people submit things.  Fark just linked to the site that linked to the original in order to stay somewhat relevant, rather than link to the original site itself. Might be an ad revenue, traffic sharing deal with AOL. Who knows.  Would be kind weird if Fark linked directly to Reddit, though.  Amusing, actually. Like admitting defeat, or there abouts.

Hey, at least it's not another banal cracked.com "Top 7" paid-for link masquerading as an actual submission...




I'll bite.

Too much chaff and too easy to fall into an echo chamber.

On another note, yet you post here.
 
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