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(Slate)   Going to the doctor when you aren't sick or dying does more harm than good   (slate.com) divider line 93
    More: Obvious, injury, prostate cancer screenings, chronic kidney disease, average wage, Rand Corporation, doctor's visit, medical  
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6905 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Aug 2013 at 9:07 PM (48 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-20 08:12:55 PM
Unfortunately too many people who "feel fine" don't understand that if they have diabetes or hypertension they are "sick"  with chronic illness and this article will give them even more false impression that the doctor can give them some medicine and they never have to come in again like setting and forgetting a Ronco rotisserie oven
 
2013-08-20 09:09:27 PM
Wash your hands, cook your food, wear a condom, and get vaccines.
 
2013-08-20 09:11:13 PM
Duh.
 
2013-08-20 09:14:01 PM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Wash your hands, cook your food, wear a condom, and get vaccines.


I ain't cookin my food.
 
2013-08-20 09:14:51 PM
Apart from anything else a healthy person in a doctor's waiting room will pick up every variety of sniffles, coughs, inexplicable rashes and galloping knob rot that could possibly exist on Satan's Petri dish.
 
2013-08-20 09:16:19 PM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Wash your hands, cook your food, wear a condom, and get vaccines.


Add to that exercise regularly, eat a balanced diet, don't smoke, don't drink to excess, and watch your stress levels.

Do all that, and you'll probably live a long healthy life.

(I say probably because freak accidents could happen to anybody, but take good care of yourself and you're far more likely to enjoy your time on this planet)
 
2013-08-20 09:17:02 PM

Spiralmonkey: Apart from anything else a healthy person in a doctor's waiting room will pick up every variety of sniffles, coughs, inexplicable rashes and galloping knob rot that could possibly exist on Satan's Petri dish.


You might want to switch doctors.
 
2013-08-20 09:19:06 PM

Silverstaff: Add to that exercise regularly, eat a balanced diet, don't smoke, don't drink to excess, and watch your stress levels.

Do all that, and you'll probably live a long healthy life.

(I say probably because freak accidents could happen to anybody, but take good care of yourself and you're far more likely to enjoy your time on this planet)


Genetics also count for quite a bit. Some people are more prone to cancer, non-pathogenic diseases, or pathogenic infection than others. In many cases, there's relatively little doctors can do to combat these deficiencies before they crop up.
 
2013-08-20 09:21:10 PM

NuttierThanEver: Unfortunately too many people who "feel fine" don't understand that if they have diabetes or hypertension they are "sick"  with chronic illness and this article will give them even more false impression that the doctor can give them some medicine and they never have to come in again like setting and forgetting a Ronco rotisserie oven


Plus it makes you evil as fark.

i487.photobucket.com
 
2013-08-20 09:24:08 PM
This is my life -EVERY.SINGLE.DAY-people who've managed to live into their 70's without medical intervention come in for a checkup then 10 vials of blood and an EKG later, they are on 5 different meds and getting set up with a rash of specialists. I just want to tell them to run and don't look back.
 
2013-08-20 09:25:16 PM
Too many unnecessary doctor visits can be traced to the huge number of people on Medicaid.  No co-pays, why not take a periodic jaunt to the doctor, maybe to score another "pain killer' prescription.
 
2013-08-20 09:26:35 PM

NuttierThanEver: Unfortunately too many people who "feel fine" don't understand that if they have diabetes or hypertension they are "sick"  with chronic illness and this article will give them even more false impression that the doctor can give them some medicine and they never have to come in again like setting and forgetting a Ronco rotisserie oven


Plus, the purpose of those "pointless" annual blood tests, urinalysis, etc., is to provide a baseline against which to compare subsequent tests. A better way to warn people against them is to say if the annual test comes back "abnormal" to say "let's not go to the biopsy just yet. Let's do another test in six months and see how that one comes out." There could be a myriad of reasons why your blood work is "abnormal" on any given day. But you do need to have a series of numbers so that the doctor can look at it and say "see, these numbers have been MOSTLY the same for the last 15 years and now suddenly they're not; something could be wrong;" as opposed to two or three random numbers that are all different.
 
2013-08-20 09:26:58 PM
The article isn't about how bad it is for you to visit a doctor on semi-regular visits for checkups...The article is about how much it is costing the overall health-care system in raw dollahs.  The author's cost/benny analysis, the over-doctoring is not worth the "relatively minimal" (quotes are mine) lives saved by these visits, vs. the dollahs spent.
 
2013-08-20 09:28:25 PM

Gyrfalcon: NuttierThanEver: Unfortunately too many people who "feel fine" don't understand that if they have diabetes or hypertension they are "sick"  with chronic illness and this article will give them even more false impression that the doctor can give them some medicine and they never have to come in again like setting and forgetting a Ronco rotisserie oven

Plus, the purpose of those "pointless" annual blood tests, urinalysis, etc., is to provide a baseline against which to compare subsequent tests. A better way to warn people against them is to say if the annual test comes back "abnormal" to say "let's not go to the biopsy just yet. Let's do another test in six months and see how that one comes out." There could be a myriad of reasons why your blood work is "abnormal" on any given day. But you do need to have a series of numbers so that the doctor can look at it and say "see, these numbers have been MOSTLY the same for the last 15 years and now suddenly they're not; something could be wrong;" as opposed to two or three random numbers that are all different.


Must not wait to do the biopsy...might get sued...better add a CT scan and MRI too. Jaysus....I think it's time for a career change.
 
2013-08-20 09:28:25 PM
The author has no readily-identifiable medical education or experience.

www.nextscientist.com
 
2013-08-20 09:28:50 PM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Wash your hands, cook your food, wear a condom, and get vaccines.


I prefer to wear my food, cook vaccines, get a hand, and wash my condoms. (That way you can reuse them! It's the ecologically friendly choice.)
 
2013-08-20 09:29:34 PM
DNRFA but......there are a bunch of chronic and ultimately debilitating and deadly conditions that can be discovered and treated earlier during annual physicals.  Not to mention cancer which needs very early treatment for successful cure.  Sure, a physician can do a bunch of physicals without finding much of anything so the cost/benefit ratio is a question.  Women typically are much better about getting annual physicals.  Men often wait until they are damn near dead before darkening the door of a doctor's office.  Last time I checked, women live longer than men.  I think men might do a little better on longevity and health status while living if they had a routine doctor visit once in awhile.  That goes for health professionals too.  Health professionals often display an impressive level of denial about their personal health status.
 
2013-08-20 09:31:11 PM

Gyrfalcon: NuttierThanEver: Unfortunately too many people who "feel fine" don't understand that if they have diabetes or hypertension they are "sick"  with chronic illness and this article will give them even more false impression that the doctor can give them some medicine and they never have to come in again like setting and forgetting a Ronco rotisserie oven

Plus, the purpose of those "pointless" annual blood tests, urinalysis, etc., is to provide a baseline against which to compare subsequent tests. A better way to warn people against them is to say if the annual test comes back "abnormal" to say "let's not go to the biopsy just yet. Let's do another test in six months and see how that one comes out." There could be a myriad of reasons why your blood work is "abnormal" on any given day. But you do need to have a series of numbers so that the doctor can look at it and say "see, these numbers have been MOSTLY the same for the last 15 years and now suddenly they're not; something could be wrong;" as opposed to two or three random numbers that are all different.


Amen.  I found out through one of these "pointless" checkups that I was Type-II (no symptoms) and was promptly put on medication. I changed my diet and got more exercise, lost some weight, and a year later (two visits later,) my #'s were within the normal range, and I was off meds.  Had I followed the article author's advice, I would have been been oblivious of the fact that I was drifting into diabetic territory, and would instead wind up in the ER 5 or 10 years later with something that would cost the system in toto much, much more than those handful of office visits.
 
2013-08-20 09:31:31 PM
Mammogram?  I think she's getting a mammogram right there in the picture.  Jeez lady put on a jacket!
 
2013-08-20 09:32:27 PM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Wash your hands, cook your food, wear a condom, and get vaccines.


In other words: Lord loves a workin' man; don't trust whitey; see a doctor and get rid of it.
 
2013-08-20 09:32:28 PM
The article isn't about how bad it is for you to visit a doctor on semi-regular visits for checkups...The article is about how much it is costing the overall health-care system in raw dollahs. The author's cost/benny analysis, the over-doctoring is not worth the "relatively minimal" (quotes are mine) lives saved by these visits, vs. the dollahs spent.

Well, it does also touch on the effects of false-positive test results on patients' health (via post-test exploration) and mental anxiety. False positives are a real problem given that doctors don't know the underlying statistics well enough to comprehend what they mean, let alone to explain it to their patients. The article itself even gets it wrong when it implies that a false positive rate will necessarily increase your risk of getting a false positive the more times you see a doctor. Technically, the probability doesn't change. What it does mean is that a test with a 10% false positive rate doesn't indicate that a positive = a 90% chance of a true positive.
 
2013-08-20 09:33:40 PM
Wait, so going to my doctor once a month for a hernia exam isn't normal?

/but I was looking forward to my monthly prostate exams
 
2013-08-20 09:34:09 PM
Today, approximately 177,000 Americans will visit a doctor, even though they have absolutely no symptoms.

And how many with symptoms but no insurance won't?


doglover: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Wash your hands, cook your food, wear a condom, and get vaccines.

I ain't cookin my food.


Fine. Have your manservant do it.
 
2013-08-20 09:37:02 PM

FourDirections: In other words: Lord loves a workin' man; don't trust whitey; see a doctor and get rid of it.


I quit giving blood when I cut myself shaving and nothing came out but air.
 
2013-08-20 09:38:41 PM
www.slate.com

That broad's tits looked healthy.
 
2013-08-20 09:40:46 PM

El Supe: Too many unnecessary doctor visits can be traced to the huge number of people on Medicaid.  No co-pays, why not take a periodic jaunt to the doctor, maybe to score another "pain killer' prescription.


Can someone else address this guy? I'm tired and he's stupid.
 
2013-08-20 09:43:22 PM
Slate is predictably doing its part to lay the groundwork for restricting care.
 
2013-08-20 09:45:23 PM
Okay, I have to go for the  low hanging fruit cheap shot.

Since this is in Slate, I assume this is some liberal rationalizing why Obamacare Death Panels are going to remove annuals from recommended care. Except for women's wellness visits which are of course, be free.
 
2013-08-20 09:46:59 PM

bearded clamorer: [www.slate.com image 568x379]

That broad's tits looked healthy.


And, the doctor looks like he could croak right there.

www.shadowlocked.com

Sure, I'll take advice from a doctor who looks sick as fark.
 
2013-08-20 09:49:55 PM
Others add-on some useful, or at least arguably useful, preventive health procedures like mammograms, cholesterol checks, and prostate-specific antigen tests.

Slate... did you just use "arguably useful" and "mammograms" in the same sentence? How f*cking stupid are you? I know you do not mean to say this in such a way, but this is awful stupid phrasing.
 
2013-08-20 09:50:08 PM

Bacontastesgood: FourDirections: In other words: Lord loves a workin' man; don't trust whitey; see a doctor and get rid of it.

I quit giving blood when I cut myself shaving and nothing came out but air.


They're supposed to stop before you're deflated!
 
2013-08-20 09:51:39 PM

megarian: Can someone else address this guy? I'm tired and he's stupid.


I prefer not to waste my time.  Just imagine his fingers being curb stomped so he never types again.
 
2013-08-20 10:03:48 PM
My medical advice: just type your symptoms into a search engine and do whatever Google says.

/might be the worst example of irresponsible "journalism" I've ever seen
 
2013-08-20 10:09:16 PM
Just type your symptoms into WebMD or MayoClinic.com and that's what you have.  Then schedule your doctor appointment and tell the doctor what you've found.  They love that.

/medical underwriter for 12 years
 
2013-08-20 10:10:18 PM

voodoomedic: My medical advice: just type your symptoms into a search engine and do whatever Google says.

/might be the worst example of irresponsible "journalism" I've ever seen


Take a picture, post it on 4chan and list your symptoms and be ready to follow their advice.


Have a sharpie handy.
 
2013-08-20 10:11:56 PM
I don't know, what's your analysis?


It's when they test your pee.
 
2013-08-20 10:12:01 PM

cchris_39: Slate is predictably doing its part to lay the groundwork for restricting care.


Care already IS restricted, you derpaholic.
 
2013-08-20 10:17:26 PM

cameroncrazy1984: cchris_39: Slate is predictably doing its part to lay the groundwork for restricting care.

Care already IS restricted, you derpaholic.


For the most part its not restricted.  You might end up paying it off for the rest of your life.  Or fall into financial ruin.  Or just say farkit and kiss that useless credit goodbye.  But yea you can get care.   Then you are farked, financialy.

People just need to buy more money though, all this debate is just stupid.  Hell ask their parents for a raise if they have to.
 
2013-08-20 10:20:36 PM

Silverstaff: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Wash your hands, cook your food, wear a condom, and get vaccines.

Add to that exercise regularly, eat a balanced diet, don't smoke, don't drink to excess, and watch your stress levels.


You won't live forever, but it'll sure feel like it.
 
2013-08-20 10:20:59 PM

JenFromTheWood: This is my life -EVERY.SINGLE.DAY-people who've managed to live into their 70's without medical intervention come in for a checkup then 10 vials of blood and an EKG later, they are on 5 different meds and getting set up with a rash of specialists. I just want to tell them to run and don't look back.


Sorry, but harm can be done without it being obvious.

A simple example--my wife is from a country without routine dental cleanings.  Her first dentist visit was here--which resulted in a deep cleaning and over the years has cost her thousands and denied her the ability to eat some things she likes.  At that the damage was caught early enough that she's still got all her teeth.

Gyrfalcon: Plus, the purpose of those "pointless" annual blood tests, urinalysis, etc., is to provide a baseline against which to compare subsequent tests. A better way to warn people against them is to say if the annual test comes back "abnormal" to say "let's not go to the biopsy just yet. Let's do another test in six months and see how that one comes out." There could be a myriad of reasons why your blood work is "abnormal" on any given day. But you do need to have a series of numbers so that the doctor can look at it and say "see, these numbers have been MOSTLY the same for the last 15 years and now suddenly they're not; something could be wrong;" as opposed to two or three random numbers that are all different.


Yeah, although the doctors get pretty CYA over even obviously bad results.  I had a thyroid test come back with a zero.  Never mind that I show no symptoms that would come from that and my thyroid levels were normal a year earlier.  The next doc to see it ordered a couple of other thyroid tests that came back normal (which couldn't have happened unless my thyroid had just magically switched off a few days earlier) but they were still determined that I get a retest of the obviously bogus number.  Sorry, you're not getting a needle in me for bad data!
 
2013-08-20 10:26:40 PM
so anyways ... enough about that story.
 
2013-08-20 10:27:45 PM

bearded clamorer: [www.slate.com image 568x379]

That broad's tits looked healthy.


Chicks don't like being called broads.
 
2013-08-20 10:35:54 PM

seancakes: bearded clamorer: [www.slate.com image 568x379]

That broad's tits looked healthy.

Chicks don't like being called broads.


Dames don't like being called chicks.
 
2013-08-20 10:39:03 PM
Does this article have anything to do with the impending doctor shortage?
 
2013-08-20 10:40:52 PM
Meh, fortunately or unfortunately, I'm the type that avoids going to the doctor unless it's something pretty severe.  I've always been that way, good or bad.  I don't see any way I could afford anything more.  Are people really paying for all these visits or is there insurance out there that's so good as to make doctor's visits affordable enough to make them a regular occurrence?
 
2013-08-20 10:42:40 PM

Lerxst2k: Does this article have anything to do with the impending doctor shortage?


If only we could do something about that... like remove the limit on new medical schools or something...

We got it backwards.  We limit the doctor schools and let law schools churn lawyers out like cheddar.
 
2013-08-20 10:45:10 PM

MrHappyRotter: Are people really paying for all these visits or is there insurance out there that's so good as to make doctor's visits affordable enough to make them a regular occurrence?


Doesn't most insurance cover a yearly physical? I'm pretty sure mine does with zero co-pay... it's at least no more than 10%.
 
2013-08-20 10:46:37 PM

orclover: voodoomedic: My medical advice: just type your symptoms into a search engine and do whatever Google says.

/might be the worst example of irresponsible "journalism" I've ever seen

Take a picture, post it on 4chan and list your symptoms and be ready to follow their advice.


Have a sharpie handy.


And a mirror. A penis is hard to free-hand on one's own forehead.
 
2013-08-20 10:47:39 PM

FrancoFile: seancakes: bearded clamorer: [www.slate.com image 568x379]

That broad's tits looked healthy.

Chicks don't like being called broads.

Dames don't like being called chicks.


An MILFs don't like being called dames.
 
2013-08-20 10:49:23 PM
OMG, I'm going on week two fighting a nasty cough/cold. I sound horrible and all people say is "Go to the doctor! " Why! So he can tell me its a cold and there's nothing he can do? Stop telling me to go to Urgent Care! It's farking annoying!
 
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