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(Daily Grindhouse)   A look back at the career and scope of influence of Elmore Leonard. Cool, from start to finish   (dailygrindhouse.com) divider line 38
    More: Cool, Elmore Leonard, humans, Richard Matheson, Roy Scheider, crime novels, Robert Mitchum, Burt Lancaster, Barry Sonnenfeld  
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2379 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 20 Aug 2013 at 7:41 PM (46 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-20 07:44:30 PM
It's cool that he's dead? Or did I miss the R.I.P. thread?
 
2013-08-20 07:48:41 PM
Now I'm depressed. R.I.P. Elmore Leonard. You were the best crime fiction writer.
 
2013-08-20 07:54:30 PM
At least James Ellroy is still alive.
 
2013-08-20 08:20:22 PM
Last of the real hustlers.....I really enjoyed his book Road dogs and hope the next generation of writers take note of his place in literary circle. God speed Dutch
 
2013-08-20 08:29:37 PM
Justified is the best show on television that nobody talks about.
 
2013-08-20 08:31:39 PM
This is not far from me, I never knew that.
 
2013-08-20 09:31:41 PM
Jackie Brown is the best Tarantino movie. Get Shorty was one of the last great Travolta movies, too. And Justified is balls away awesome.
 
2013-08-20 10:20:31 PM
I never got the hype.  The only book of his that I really enjoyed was "Swag".

I gave up on him a while ago, but gave him another shot because Justified is so damn good.  Unfortunately, een his Raylan Givens books are average at best.
 
2013-08-20 10:21:22 PM
even, dammit
 
2013-08-20 10:46:34 PM
At least he had a very full life. 87 bucks the average male lifespan. If he were 50 I'd actually be pissed, sort of how I'm pissed that people like Jimi Hendrix had to go yet Ted Nugent remains to annoy us all.

Side note regarding crime novels: I picked up a James Patterson book at an airport once because everyone kept talking about how awesome he is. That guy is awful. His plot was ok, I guess, for airplane reading, but I couldn't get past how he writes like a college freshman. Why is that guy so popular? Is it because his books take no effort to read?

/book was so bad I don't even recall the title
 
2013-08-20 10:47:13 PM
Before Obama we had Hope, Cash, Jobs, Gandolfini, Leonard and that guy from Glee.

Now at least we still have Hope, Cash, Jobs, Gandolfini and the guy from Glee.
 
2013-08-20 10:50:11 PM
I've never been able to get into him. Too flippant or something, unlike Chandler or Hammett.

I should give him a try again

anyway, rip dead writer guy
 
2013-08-20 10:56:16 PM
"Justified is the best show on television that nobody talks about.Very True
 
2013-08-20 11:06:10 PM
i.imgur.com

RIP Elmore James
 
2013-08-20 11:09:08 PM

Eufah Kennidiets: I never got the hype.  The only book of his that I really enjoyed was "Swag".

I gave up on him a while ago, but gave him another shot because Justified is so damn good.  Unfortunately, een his Raylan Givens books are average at best.


I agree. His stuff is too "cute" by half, in my opinion.
 
2013-08-20 11:53:42 PM

dickfreckle: At least he had a very full life. 87 bucks the average male lifespan. If he were 50 I'd actually be pissed, sort of how I'm pissed that people like Jimi Hendrix had to go yet Ted Nugent remains to annoy us all.

Side note regarding crime novels: I picked up a James Patterson book at an airport once because everyone kept talking about how awesome he is. That guy is awful. His plot was ok, I guess, for airplane reading, but I couldn't get past how he writes like a college freshman. Why is that guy so popular? Is it because his books take no effort to read?

/book was so bad I don't even recall the title


Probably the same reason Dan Brown is so popular and Duck Dynasty and Honey Boo Boo roam the airwaves: a lot of people just don't want to be challenged by their entertainment. At all.
 
2013-08-21 12:22:44 AM

dickfreckle: At least he had a very full life. 87 bucks the average male lifespan. If he were 50 I'd actually be pissed, sort of how I'm pissed that people like Jimi Hendrix had to go yet Ted Nugent remains to annoy us all.

Side note regarding crime novels: I picked up a James Patterson book at an airport once because everyone kept talking about how awesome he is. That guy is awful. His plot was ok, I guess, for airplane reading, but I couldn't get past how he writes like a college freshman. Why is that guy so popular? Is it because his books take no effort to read?

/book was so bad I don't even recall the title


James Patterson:
"How does he do it? Well, ever since 1996, when he published a novel called Miracle on the 17th Green with a golfing buddy, he has done it by finding collaborators to help him fill in the blanks. He comes up with the plot, they write the sentences, he reviews draft after draft. To hear Patterson tell it, he simply has too many ideas to write them all up himself, so he enlists an army of co-writers. He resists the word "factory", of course, or "formula". "
"The genius of Patterson's collaborative method is its salesmanship. His co-authors are plainly credited on the covers in a font several point sizes smaller, but the books are always James Patterson books. Patterson used to be chief executive at the ad agency J Walter Thompson, and he knows a thing or two about branding. So savvy is he that he has become the subject of an MBA course at Harvard. (The professor, John Deighton, had heard Patterson give a talk and was stunned by his canniness. "I'd never actually heard a product speak," Deighton said. "It was like listening to a can of Coca-Cola describe how it would like to be marketed.") In the past, Patterson has been known to pay for his own TV ads, and to come up with his own slogans ("The pages turn themselves"), but now he is so entrenched as a brand he needn't concern himself with any of that. "
http://www.theguardian.com/books/2009/apr/05/james-patterson-author- be stseller
 
2013-08-21 12:40:58 AM
3:10 to Yuma is, what, maybe 5-7 pages long? Two feature length movies made and both were great. A buddy and I were JUST talking about Elmore Leonard, a few days ago, and we both agreed it was really well-written. The guy spun a good tale. Adios, sir.
 
2013-08-21 12:56:30 AM
I read quite a bit of fiction and I never enjoyed an Elmore Leonard book.
Then, I watch the movies made from his books and I am thoroughly entertained.
Clearly there was something in his books I just never picked up and it's probably all my fault.
That said, I'd usually prefer some Stephen Dobyns.
 
2013-08-21 01:00:27 AM
cdn-static.denofgeek.com

Do the eyebrows!
 
2013-08-21 02:21:48 AM

Bonanza Jellybean: At least James Ellroy is still alive.


Funny, Ellroy never really looks that way.
 
2013-08-21 02:27:25 AM

simplicimus: dickfreckle: At least he had a very full life. 87 bucks the average male lifespan. If he were 50 I'd actually be pissed, sort of how I'm pissed that people like Jimi Hendrix had to go yet Ted Nugent remains to annoy us all.

Side note regarding crime novels: I picked up a James Patterson book at an airport once because everyone kept talking about how awesome he is. That guy is awful. His plot was ok, I guess, for airplane reading, but I couldn't get past how he writes like a college freshman. Why is that guy so popular? Is it because his books take no effort to read?

/book was so bad I don't even recall the title

James Patterson:
"How does he do it? Well, ever since 1996, when he published a novel called Miracle on the 17th Green with a golfing buddy, he has done it by finding collaborators to help him fill in the blanks. He comes up with the plot, they write the sentences, he reviews draft after draft. To hear Patterson tell it, he simply has too many ideas to write them all up himself, so he enlists an army of co-writers. He resists the word "factory", of course, or "formula". "
"The genius of Patterson's collaborative method is its salesmanship. His co-authors are plainly credited on the covers in a font several point sizes smaller, but the books are always James Patterson books. Patterson used to be chief executive at the ad agency J Walter Thompson, and he knows a thing or two about branding. So savvy is he that he has become the subject of an MBA course at Harvard. (The professor, John Deighton, had heard Patterson give a talk and was stunned by his canniness. "I'd never actually heard a product speak," Deighton said. "It was like listening to a can of Coca-Cola describe how it would like to be marketed.") In the past, Patterson has been known to pay for his own TV ads, and to come up with his own slogans ("The pages turn themselves"), but now he is so entrenched as a brand he needn't concern himself with any of that. "
http://www.theguardian.com/books/2009/ ...


This explains a great deal as to why I could read a Patterson novel and 15 minutes after finishing it, be unable to recall any coherent aspect of the lot or its resolution. Maybe the premise of the story, but that was usually about it. I felt somewhat guilty that I missed something about his popularity as well. Thanks for posting that quote, I feel immensely better now.
 
2013-08-21 02:33:33 AM

simplicimus: dickfreckle: At least he had a very full life. 87 bucks the average male lifespan. If he were 50 I'd actually be pissed, sort of how I'm pissed that people like Jimi Hendrix had to go yet Ted Nugent remains to annoy us all.

Side note regarding crime novels: I picked up a James Patterson book at an airport once because everyone kept talking about how awesome he is. That guy is awful. His plot was ok, I guess, for airplane reading, but I couldn't get past how he writes like a college freshman. Why is that guy so popular? Is it because his books take no effort to read?

/book was so bad I don't even recall the title

James Patterson:
"How does he do it? Well, ever since 1996, when he published a novel called Miracle on the 17th Green with a golfing buddy, he has done it by finding collaborators to help him fill in the blanks. He comes up with the plot, they write the sentences, he reviews draft after draft. To hear Patterson tell it, he simply has too many ideas to write them all up himself, so he enlists an army of co-writers. He resists the word "factory", of course, or "formula". "
"The genius of Patterson's collaborative method is its salesmanship. His co-authors are plainly credited on the covers in a font several point sizes smaller, but the books are always James Patterson books. Patterson used to be chief executive at the ad agency J Walter Thompson, and he knows a thing or two about branding. So savvy is he that he has become the subject of an MBA course at Harvard. (The professor, John Deighton, had heard Patterson give a talk and was stunned by his canniness. "I'd never actually heard a product speak," Deighton said. "It was like listening to a can of Coca-Cola describe how it would like to be marketed.") In the past, Patterson has been known to pay for his own TV ads, and to come up with his own slogans ("The pages turn themselves"), but now he is so entrenched as a brand he needn't concern himself with any of that. "
http://www.theguardian.com/books/2009/ ...


Damn, that does explain a lot.
 
2013-08-21 02:46:00 AM

simplicimus: "I'd never actually heard a product speak," Deighton said. "It was like listening to a can of Coca-Cola describe how it would like to be marketed."


Lulz,


Dahnkster: 3:10 to Yuma is, what, maybe 5-7 pages long? Two feature length movies made and both were great. A buddy and I were JUST talking about Elmore Leonard, a few days ago, and we both agreed it was really well-written. The guy spun a good tale. Adios, sir.


I only saw the most recent remake, but one thing that bugged me: I thought the gang was trying to rescue Russell Crowe's character? How are they going to accomplish that by shooting at him indiscriminately?
 
2013-08-21 03:17:34 AM

corq: Bonanza Jellybean: At least James Ellroy is still alive.

Funny, Ellroy never really looks that way.


splicedwire.com
Frowns upon your shenanigans
 
2013-08-21 03:48:50 AM
Read a bunch of his books the summer I was 14, loved them for their trashy honest realities and easy reading. RIP.
 
2013-08-21 06:44:08 AM

dickfreckle: At least he had a very full life. 87 bucks the average male lifespan. If he were 50 I'd actually be pissed, sort of how I'm pissed that people like Jimi Hendrix had to go yet Ted Nugent remains to annoy us all.

Side note regarding crime novels: I picked up a James Patterson book at an airport once because everyone kept talking about how awesome he is. That guy is awful. His plot was ok, I guess, for airplane reading, but I couldn't get past how he writes like a college freshman. Why is that guy so popular? Is it because his books take no effort to read?

/book was so bad I don't even recall the title


He doesn't write them.  He provides the plot outline and subcontracts with ghosts.  That is how he can produce four a year.
 
2013-08-21 06:52:12 AM
Damn, loved his books when I was younger. Will have to revisit them soon, RIP
 
2013-08-21 07:38:02 AM
I have one complaint about Leonard's writing style: he loathes segues. I understand his philosophy on the subject, and how he likes a terse, tight novel. Sometimes, though, the transition between scenes doesn't exist, and I lose track of which characters are where, doing what.
 
2013-08-21 08:11:53 AM
upload.wikimedia.org

R.I.P NAME IS ALREADY THERE, PEOPLE
 
2013-08-21 08:30:00 AM

Another Government Employee: dickfreckle: At least he had a very full life. 87 bucks the average male lifespan. If he were 50 I'd actually be pissed, sort of how I'm pissed that people like Jimi Hendrix had to go yet Ted Nugent remains to annoy us all.

Side note regarding crime novels: I picked up a James Patterson book at an airport once because everyone kept talking about how awesome he is. That guy is awful. His plot was ok, I guess, for airplane reading, but I couldn't get past how he writes like a college freshman. Why is that guy so popular? Is it because his books take no effort to read?

/book was so bad I don't even recall the title

He doesn't write them.  He provides the plot outline and subcontracts with ghosts.  That is how he can produce four a year.


It gets better (from the same article):
"When I ask Patterson about his co-writers, he lists seven or eight of them, none of whom lives nearby (it's all done remotely), all of whom have different strengths - and, he adds with a little roll of his eyes, different levels of dependability. He speaks of them almost as if they were his occasionally wayward children. I ask him about the deals he strikes - the rumour is that they get bonuses but not royalties, that they are well paid for their efforts, and that they often go on to get solo publishing deals.

"They actually pay me. Because they're learning so much," he says with an entirely straight face. Then he smiles, and tells me he doesn't discuss the financial transactions. There's a pause. "Unless you want to do something together?" he says."
  Bolding mine.
 
2013-08-21 08:44:41 AM
Why even have an opinion about James Patterson. His sales make him a force of nature and above the traditional moral universe of bad verse good writing. You might was well spit back at rain or try to explain character development and continuity to a Harry Potter enthusiast.
 
2013-08-21 08:55:38 AM
I started writing a crime novel recently when I realized I'd read all the Elmore Leonard books at my library and/or used bookstore. No, he's not Hemingway or Dickens, but I did love to read the man's work.

I have some rules for how I spend my fiction reading time:

1) No brilliant serial killers.  If I see that on the jacket, we're automatically on to the next book.

2)  No vast secret terrifying government conspiracies.  Next.

3)  No quirky detectives surrounded by people who don't appreciate their brilliance.  Next.

4)  No families with horrible secrets in their past that must not be uncovered.  (Sorry, Ross Macdonald. I really enjoyed that plot the first eight times you did it.)

Which brings me to why I love Elmore Leonard.  No, not the tightest writer around, but his characters are just guys. They are not brilliant, or "the best at what they do."  They are often not very bright, and are frequently outguessed or outsmarted by their antagonists. They're not fighting to save the world, they're going after a pile of cash just big enough that you yourself would be tempted. There's no "whodunnit", but there's enough of a body count to keep you guessing -- the guy kills off as many characters as George RR Martin.

Unlike Stephen King, Leonard understands why people do bad things.  He gets human evil in a way the "shocking dark terrible serial killer on the loose and only one brilliant misunderstood detective can stop him" writers don't.
 
2013-08-21 10:03:07 AM
The "Get Shorty" trifecta is sadly now complete.

James Gandolfini
Dennis Farina
Elmore Leonard

It's been a rough summer.
 
2013-08-21 11:29:16 AM
I worked for Leonard's agent years ago.  The agent, HN Swanson, had been a very big deal decades before, but was an old hasbeen when I worked there.  All his clients were total nobodies except for Elmore Leonard.  Leonard refused to abandon my boss because the guy had given him his first big break.
 
2013-08-21 11:59:36 AM

fusillade762: Probably the same reason Dan Brown is so popular and Duck Dynasty and Honey Boo Boo roam the airwaves: a lot of people just don't want to be challenged by their entertainment. At all.


Why would anyone want to be "challenged" by their entertainment?  That sounds like work.  Either you like something or you don't, but you shouldn't have to work to like something.

And I've never seen an episode of Honey Boo Boo, but people who do watch it say the show works because it's about a family that likes being together, not because they're all brain dead idiots.
 
2013-08-21 10:44:17 PM

itsadm71: Justified is the best show on television that nobody talks about.


I consider it my Sopranos. That's what I told my Italian/Sicilian friend. It's like my Sopranos. Being from Tennessee, and having a deceased relative that was in the Dixie Mafic; it just sort of clicks. Plus I'm close enough to the area to actually drive and sight-see some Justified goodness.
 
2013-08-22 12:35:11 AM

Dog Welder: The "Get Shorty" trifecta is sadly now complete.

James Gandolfini
Dennis Farina
Elmore Leonard

It's been a rough summer.


Danny DeVito better watch his ass.
 
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