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(Anchorage Daily News)   Bill O'Reilly vacations in Alaska. And then has to ruin it all by trying to psychoanalyze everything. "This is America the way it used to be"   (adn.com) divider line 251
    More: Silly, Bill O'Reilly, Alaskans, Fox News  
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4506 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Aug 2013 at 10:29 AM (48 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-20 01:53:03 PM

Cubicle Jockey: The other 62% goes to SSI, local aid, or block grants.


With that too, you have to cosider the federal obligation to Native Americans that are outside the jurisdition and control of the state government.  It is not likely a huge chunk of that 62% as Native Americans are about 17% of the population.
 
2013-08-20 01:57:07 PM

Pocket Ninja: It's absolutely true. Everyone in Alaska is content to be snowed in for months at a time with no modern conveniences such as electricity, running water, or the Internet. They live off the fat of the land, hunting moose with black powder rifles and ice fishing. They bury their meat in the ground and smoke it that way. They go on long walks into the wilderness with only bags of rice and a knife to survive, and some of them never come back, and they simply nod at that and explain that "this is Alaska." They share their wives with strangers and when someone grows too ill to survive another winter, he does not complain or whimper about "universal health care;" no, he merely finds an ice floe and sits down upon it and faces west so that he can witness one last sunset, one last beacon of God's creation, before allowing himself to slip silently beneath the waves. Capitalism for an Alaskan consists of bartering bits of bone, wild nuts, and salmon for what necessities he cannot make on his own. They are like Canadians, in some ways, except of course Alaskans cherish freedom and liberty above all things, even life, while Canadians do not. For it is true that long ago God crafted a mold from which he fashioned the earliest pioneers, those rugged individuals who wrenched America from the vast and empty wilderness. When the job was done, God cast that mold aside, into a land where only the strongest and most able could survive. That land was Alaska, and the mold lies there still.


You're beautiful.
 
2013-08-20 02:03:53 PM

Frank N Stein: Rocket To Russia: Frank N Stein: Rocket To Russia: Frank N Stein: Alaska is great. There's so much open space, beautiful terrain, and amazing wildlife that one can easily spend a day away from another human and explore. Its not hard to find an empty stream to fish, or lazily kayak a bay to observe whales and seals, or spent a day hiking up a mountain.

Sounds like a liberal environmentalist's paradise!

Yeah, could be. Also enjoyed by conservative conservationists or just people who enjoy nature.

Whatever happened to the concept of a 'conservative conservationist', anyway? Even though it seems obvious and logical, these days the phrase sounds like an oxymoron.

They're still out there. Although no-one really uses the term "conservative conservationist". It's a clumsy phrase that I used just to counter your "liberal environmentalist" term. However there are plenty of conservatives that identify as conservationist. Organizations such as Ducks Unlimited, which does great work in protecting wetlands, are I'm guessing full of political conservatives.


Ducks Unlimited was the first thing I thought of too, but I asked the question anyway to see what answer I'd get. I miss real conservatives, as opposed to most of the people calling themselves conservatives now. Those people seem to be just anti-everything, and that includes environmentalism, for the sake of "pissin' off the libs".
 
2013-08-20 02:06:27 PM

DarwiOdrade: So, still no one saying  "M-Fer, I want more iced tea."


But we got "you can't explain that" covered, so there's that. You gotta move on with the times!
 
2013-08-20 02:08:35 PM

Gonz: Churchill2004: Corvus:

You mean the old America that was socialist?

Not related to the oil fund, but what the hell's up with her glasses in that pic? They're not symmetrical- one side is half-framed, the other full-framed. I've never seen glasses like that, and I've bought a new pair of glasses every year or two since I was in 1st grade. They look like someone smacked her upside the head and broke them.

OK, you wear glasses, go do an experiment: go look at yourself in a mirror.

I don't want to use the wrong technical term here, but check out how the shape of your face is distorted by the lens. The line from your forehead to jaw will look like it has a dent in it. The stronger your prescription, the more distortion there will be.

Now, look at every picture of Palin. There's never any of that- no break in the line. Her glasses aren't serving any purpose- they're strictly for show. They're a prop.


I've got some serious coke-bottles, and every single picture of me has that effect to the max, so I'm perfectly familiar with it. 

The lack of fishbowl effect (hell if I know the technical term) doesn't jump out at you, though. Plenty of people have relatively weak scrips so it's not very noticeable, particularly if it's just reading glasses. I wouldn't be surprised if hers are just cosmetic, but I don't think you can definitely tell that just from a pic. Most people's glasses seem like flat planes of glass compared to mine.

The half-half-frame jumped out at me because it's unbalanced. Like I said, it looks like someone gave her a good smackin' around and broke the things.
 
2013-08-20 02:08:44 PM

EyeballKid: Lost Thought 00: Unless he's vacationing in the interior, he's never actually seen what Alaska is like.

You think Palin used that pick-up line with McCain or Roger Ailes?


You funny bastard!
 
2013-08-20 02:15:39 PM
Butt farking cold or when you were 8 years old?
 
2013-08-20 02:17:39 PM

Rocket To Russia: Those people seem to be just anti-everything, and that includes environmentalism, for the sake of "pissin' off the libs".


The issue you run into here (rural west) is that the 'anti-everything' position has been co-opted the the radical envioronmentalis.  Many of the traditional conservatives recognize multiple-use as the best standard so long as you do things in the right way.  Most ranches and logging companies use sustainable practices and mining companies are typically held to a pretty high environmental standard.  This satisfies many of us since we get to make a living off the land, but we can still enjoy it to hunt, fish and recreate.  Sadly, there are those environmental groups that ignore this and still attempt to abolish all natural resource extraction.

Add to this the Antiquites Act habit of Clinton arbitrarily locking up chunks of land and New Yorkers proposing NREPA without any real input from the locals or Congress and you get some pretty grumpy rural folks.

For what it is worth, the pendulum has appeard to swing somewhat back toward the middle somewhat once Babbitt's reign ended, but the fight still is ongoing.
 
2013-08-20 02:21:11 PM

HeadLever: Rocket To Russia: Whatever happened to the concept of a 'conservative conservationist', anyway?

That may be because the liberals that make the talking points problably refuse to belive that they exist.  The town where I come from is mostly supported by mining and ranching and some logging where nearly everyone is conservative and loves to hunt, fish, ski, hike, camp, snomobile, dirtbike, hunt for shed antlers, birdwatch, pick wild chokecherries, rasberries, mushrooms, asparagus, horseradish and plums.  They don't want to see these lands become another California and will fight to keep public access open and these areas wild.


Conservatives should be conservationists! They share the same root word, fer cripes sake! What I don't get are the ones who call themselves conservatives just because they only do the opposite of what liberals do, and that includes environmentalism. That's not an ideology, that's a temper tantrum.
 
2013-08-20 02:21:40 PM
If Bill O'Reilly says nothing, is he still wrong?
 
2013-08-20 02:22:38 PM

Frank N Stein: Alaska is great. There's so much open space, beautiful terrain, and amazing wildlife that one can easily spend a day away from another human and explore. Its not hard to find an empty stream to fish, or lazily kayak a bay to observe whales and seals, or spent a day hiking up a mountain. I miss it every once in a while when I'm dealing with annoying panhandlers, busy crowds of assholes, and the overarching smell of urine here in Chicago.


it doesnt smell like pee in my Chicago office.  Maybe you should change your Depends.
 
2013-08-20 02:24:26 PM

Mr. Shabooboo: Bill likes his wilderness like he likes his cities

Uneducated
Racist
Sexist
Homophobic
Antisemitic
People in constant fear of their own shadow
Trigger happy

 Just like the good lawrd intended..


URSHPT?
 
2013-08-20 02:30:48 PM

Rocket To Russia: Conservatives should be conservationists! They share the same root word, fer cripes sake! What I don't get are the ones who call themselves conservatives just because they only do the opposite of what liberals do, and that includes environmentalism. That's not an ideology, that's a temper tantrum.


Conserve does not always align with environmentalism.  Especially when considering the anti-everything faction of environmentailism.
 
2013-08-20 02:37:24 PM

Cyberluddite: People in Alaska sure seem to likelove Costco and worship the place like a religion, even more than people in the lower 48

everywhere and so should you.

FTFY.
 
2013-08-20 02:43:18 PM

Kirzania: Cyberluddite: People in Alaska sure seem to likelove Costco and worship the place like a religion, even more than people in the lower 48everywhere and so should you.

FTFY.


I do.  In fact, I got my law degree there!
 
2013-08-20 02:49:33 PM

ginkor: A few travelogue tips on visiting Alaska.

1)  Anchorage is entirely civilized, clean and pretty.  There are Victorian and modern bed and breakfasts near the center of the city, as well as fine hotels, but you have to book far ahead of time.  Lots of green everything and the city has a flower theme in summer.  Golden and bald eagles instead of pigeons.

2)  The first two weeks of July are the best time to visit, because temperatures in Anchorage are in the high 60's to low 70's, by then the mosquitoes are gone, and there is about 20 hours of sunlight a day, so you never want to sleep and want to walk everywhere.

3)  The state railroad is classic 1940s style, comfortable with lots of leg room, which is a great way to travel to Seward, because it is insanely beautiful.  Seward is gorgeous, but has a more classical Alaskan look, and is where you can catch a 100-ton boat to see the Denali National Park.

4)  As peaceful and calm as the land is, the water is right at the border of fisherman's heaven and hell.  It is full of giant fish, but can turn from smooth as glass to 8-10' swells in minutes.  There are warnings everywhere that the glacial silt beaches are deadly, and they are not kidding.

5)  In the countryside, there are critters everywhere, including bear, moose, reindeer, wolves, you name it.  There are also little creeks everywhere, and many people commute with light aircraft.

6)  Oddly enough, the prices there are pretty comparable for most things, though there are no convenience stores and few fast food restaurants.  Direct flights to many US cities.


You obviously only saw the very tourist friendly and sanitized parts of Alaska. Your number 6 post was the biggest giveaway.
Hey! Wait a minute...is that you,Bill?

/I prefer the bush, it's pretty rough and mad max-ish though....not too postcard worthy.
 
2013-08-20 02:53:20 PM

Nuclear Monk: Can't explain this either:


The massive Cook inlet or Bristol bay tides would probably give him an aneurism.
He should visit!
 
2013-08-20 03:19:04 PM

Cyberluddite: Since I was in Alaska the same week as Billo, I'll pass along my impressions of the place (the people and culture, not the scenery, which of course is magnificent), which don't necessarily align with Bill's:

--About half the population of the state lives in Anchorage, but it's still not a very large city, maybe around 300K people (spread out over a very large geographical area of city limits).  The people in Anchorage fancy the place to be something of a cosmoplitan urban area similar to, I dunno, Seattle.  It's not.  It reminds me more of a larger version of Eureka, California--a working seaport area that, while not large, is still by far the largest city for many, many miles in any direction (in the case of Anchorage, a couple thousand miles).  While the area it's in is scenic (like virtually all of Alaska), the town itself (i.e., the buildings and architecture) isn't particularly scenic.  But it does have lots of good places to eat, good places to stay, and the everyday commercial enterprises that are in any decent-sized town in the lower 48 but that generally don't exist elsewhere in Alaska outside of Anchorage (Costco, etc.).  It's home to the only freeway in the entire state of Alaska (about 25 miles worth), so it's definitely more urban and "crowded" than the rest of the state, though to an outside it still seems like a small town.

--Even though, as mentioned above, Anchorage is hardly a crowded metropolis, many of the Alaskan people outside of Anchorage talk shiat about it as if it is the worst, most crowded and oppressive kind of urban hellscape.  It's the same sort of comments one hears in rural California about how "They're tryin' to turn this place into L.A.!" except in Alaska you hear them say "If we did that, we would be just like Anchorage!"  In their minds, Anchorage and L.A. are basically the same kind of place--some of the locals even sarcastically refer to Anchorage as "Los Anchorage," as seen on this defaced road sign I snapped a pic of:



Of course, as much as they profess to dislike what Anchorage represents, those close enough to go there do so regularly.  To go to Costco, for example.  People in Alaska sure seem to like Costco and worship the place like a religion, even more than people in the lower 48.  And you can kinda understand why, of course--when the nearest town's only general store sells no "fresh" meat other than a couple of frozen sirloin steaks (purchased from Costco on the store owner's most recent trip to Anchorage, most likely) stored in a residential style Kenmore freezer in the back of the store for $15 a pound, the fresh fruit and vegetable selection consists of one head of cabbage and two dried-up onions, and rest of the food selection consists of a few cans of Del Monte green beans, a few loaves of Wonder bread, a few bags of Fritos, and a couple of dozen similar products, going to Costco has got to seem like a trip through the Garden of Eden.

--The vast majority of people who live in Alaska were born elsewhere and moved there later--sometimes as kids along with their parents, but most often as adults.  For some reason it seemed that half the people I met who lived there had moved there from either Minnesota or Pennsylvania, along with a number of other places.  Some of them may leave in the winter and work/live in places such as Washington or Oregon for the season, but they all seem fiercely devoted to Alaska and swear they would never move anywhere else.  I can understand this.  Many of these people came for a visit years ago and fell in love with the place and never left.  I can also understand this--I didn't really want to leave either!

--There are plenty of rednecks in Alaska (as the existence of the Palin clan proves), but there is also a decent representation of groovy hippie leftist types.  The former outnumbers the latter, of course, and the former is more likely to vote, resulting in Alaska being a very red state politically.  Both groups, however, share a certain amount of common ground--they both tend to be of a certain libertarian bent, they both like the outdoors (and many of the same outdoor activities, including hunting and fishing), both like the fact that they can avoid sales and income taxes in Alaska by taxing oil production, and they both complain about being ripped off on health care expenses.  One thing that seems very different about much of the rest of America is that both groups generally seem to like and appreciate each other, and are respectful of either other's views while disagreeing with them.  They drink in the same bars (because there may be only one bar in town), their kids go to the same schools (because there may be only one school in the area), they work in the same industries or even at the same places, and they see each other all the time and know about how the other half actually lives and what they do.  So it's harder, I think, to rely on stereotypes and false narratives about the other side, because they know first-hand that some of those stereotypes and narratives don't actually apply to the people they personally know quite well.  So they may discuss politics in the local bar and jokingly dismiss the other's views with an "of course you would say that, because that's how you Palin-lovin' rednecks think" or "well, yeah, I figured an Obama-lovin' hippie like you would think that," and then buy the next round and talk about going moose hunting next month.  In that respect, Billo is right, it's more like "America used to be," before he and others on Fox and similar sources poisoned the well by vitriolically demonizing those who don't think they way they do.


You nailed it. It sounds like you got off the beaten path and got a true sense of what makes that place so great.
 
2013-08-20 03:22:20 PM
About the government welfare argument, the federal government has locked up so much of the Alaskan lands and resources that the population is basically unable to develop, profit from, or even expand very far into land that should, rightfully, belong to the state per agreements made when the territory became a state.  If the federal government is going to stifle development on purpose and treat a state like a 3rd world territory then the government had better compensate the population for it.

Secondly, I'm told that the dividend isn't socialist, but royalty checks paid from oil companies that are wrecking the state by pumping out all of the oil and then selling it back to the residents at wildly inflated prices.  What could be more American than allowing someone the pleasure of paying you to rape your land?  When I argue that the idea of the residents owning and profiting from the land collectively sounds a little...red, I'm told I don't understand the issue.

Thirdly, as a resident of interior Alaska...it sucks.  Never move here.  You may hear stories about how beautiful it is or you may crave an Alaskan adventure, but just don't.  Nothing looks as good as a professional photographer and imaging software can make it.  Let your dreams stay in your head.  However, if you MUST come, don't wait until you're 80.  An unreasonable number of old people come up here because it's on their bucket list and they die in camp grounds, hotels, and RVs.  It can be an expensive problem to solve.

Winter, mud, fire, fall, winter.  The Alaskan seasons.
 
2013-08-20 03:23:48 PM

Frank N Stein: Cyberluddite:

You seem to really dislike the place. Why did you visit a sparsely populated area full of rural folks and vast wilderness if you don't like sparsely populated areas full of rural folks and vast wilderness?


Did you read the same trip summary I did?
His last paragraph summed up the parts of Alaska I know beautifully.
 
2013-08-20 03:29:55 PM

ficklefkrfark: ginkor: A few travelogue tips on visiting Alaska.

1)  Anchorage is entirely civilized, clean and pretty.  There are Victorian and modern bed and breakfasts near the center of the city, as well as fine hotels, but you have to book far ahead of time.  Lots of green everything and the city has a flower theme in summer.  Golden and bald eagles instead of pigeons.

2)  The first two weeks of July are the best time to visit, because temperatures in Anchorage are in the high 60's to low 70's, by then the mosquitoes are gone, and there is about 20 hours of sunlight a day, so you never want to sleep and want to walk everywhere.

3)  The state railroad is classic 1940s style, comfortable with lots of leg room, which is a great way to travel to Seward, because it is insanely beautiful.  Seward is gorgeous, but has a more classical Alaskan look, and is where you can catch a 100-ton boat to see the Denali National Park.

4)  As peaceful and calm as the land is, the water is right at the border of fisherman's heaven and hell.  It is full of giant fish, but can turn from smooth as glass to 8-10' swells in minutes.  There are warnings everywhere that the glacial silt beaches are deadly, and they are not kidding.

5)  In the countryside, there are critters everywhere, including bear, moose, reindeer, wolves, you name it.  There are also little creeks everywhere, and many people commute with light aircraft.

6)  Oddly enough, the prices there are pretty comparable for most things, though there are no convenience stores and few fast food restaurants.  Direct flights to many US cities.

You obviously only saw the very tourist friendly and sanitized parts of Alaska. Your number 6 post was the biggest giveaway.
Hey! Wait a minute...is that you,Bill?

/I prefer the bush, it's pretty rough and mad max-ish though....not too postcard worthy.


Yeah, that's like me making statements about all of New York City based on my stay in Manhattan during New Years once.
 
2013-08-20 03:36:24 PM

heavymetal: Yeah, that's like me making statements about all of New York City based on my stay in Manhattan during New Years once.


Except there is tons of shiat to see in NYC.   Once you have seen a tree, a bear, a fish, a meth addict, and a drunk eskimo you can pretty much describe anywhere in that shiathole of a state with a pretty precise degree of accuracy. 

The only good thing about Alaska is some little shiathole cabin masquerading as a hotel in ninilchik (iirc) with a big sign that says "Enjoy nice modern hotel" - that made me laugh a bit before I went back to looking for ways to kill myself so as not to spend any more time in Alaska.
 
2013-08-20 04:00:35 PM

lilplatinum: The only good thing about Alaska is some little shiathole cabin masquerading as a hotel in ninilchik (iirc) with a big sign that says "Enjoy nice modern hotel" - that made me laugh a bit before I went back to looking for ways to kill myself so as not to spend any more time in Alaska.


Sounds like you need to select your places better.  In one of the places we stayed in Alaska (a B&B), we had probably the nicest room I've ever stayed in anywhere, at any price.  The room was about 700 square feet, with a bathroom bigger than most people in Manhattan's entire apartment, including a full-size round (about 7 or 8 feet in diameter) jacuzzi tub, shower with two shower heads, and full-size in-room sauna.  Not that I wanted to watch TV while I was there, but for those who do, the room had about a 50" LED flat-screen with a huge number of premium sattelite channels, along with a blu-ray player, and libary of movies to choose from downstairs. Of course, there was high-speed wi-fi access in the room, as you would expect.  All of this for around $200 a night--less than half the price I typically pay for a small, ordinary room in a decent hotel in Manhattan.

Or maybe I just dreamed all of that, because you stayed in a shiathole dump in East Moosefart Village, AK, and everything else in the entire state is obviously the same as that, right?
 
2013-08-20 04:12:42 PM

lilplatinum: heavymetal: Yeah, that's like me making statements about all of New York City based on my stay in Manhattan during New Years once.

Except there is tons of shiat to see in NYC.   Once you have seen a tree, a bear, a fish, a meth addict, and a drunk eskimo you can pretty much describe anywhere in that shiathole of a state with a pretty precise degree of accuracy.

The only good thing about Alaska is some little shiathole cabin masquerading as a hotel in ninilchik (iirc) with a big sign that says "Enjoy nice modern hotel" - that made me laugh a bit before I went back to looking for ways to kill myself so as not to spend any more time in Alaska.


I agree with you 100%  I mean, just look at this picture I took off the back deck of the hunting cabin last weekend.

img694.imageshack.us

Horrific.  Stay far, far away from Alaska if you possibly can.
 
2013-08-20 04:19:35 PM
We used to get PFD checks? DAMN IT what happened?!
 
2013-08-20 04:24:22 PM

Cyberluddite: Sounds like you need to select your places better.  In one of the places we stayed in Alaska (a B&B), we had probably the nicest room I've ever stayed in anywhere, at any price.  The room was about 700 square feet, with a bathroom bigger than most people in Manhattan's entire apartment, including a full-size round (about 7 or 8 feet in diameter) jacuzzi tub, shower with two shower heads, and full-size in-room sauna.  Not that I wanted to watch TV while I was there, but for those who do, the room had about a 50" LED flat-screen with a huge number of premium sattelite channels, along with a blu-ray player, and libary of movies to choose from downstairs. Of course, there was high-speed wi-fi access in the room, as you would expect.  All of this for around $200 a night--less than half the price I typically pay for a small, ordinary room in a decent hotel in Manhattan.

Or maybe I just dreamed all of that, because you stayed in a shiathole dump in East Moosefart Village, AK, and everything else in the entire state is obviously the same as that, right?


I lived there for a year and went up to fish at my Aunt's fish site twice for summer during colleges (the things we subject ourselves to Money).   I've been to every excuse for a 'large' settlement there as well as crisscrossed through a good portion of nature. 

Try living there in Winter and see how awesome it is when you get off of the tour guide track.
 
2013-08-20 04:24:59 PM

Skyd1v: I agree with you 100%  I mean, just look at this picture I took off the back deck of the hunting cabin last weekend.


Wow, trees AND water?   AND you get to stalk animals with firearms?  Wow, that sure sounds swell!
 
2013-08-20 04:26:18 PM

leonel: We used to get PFD checks? DAMN IT what happened?!


Adobe licensing fees and compatibility issues killed the profit margin.
 
2013-08-20 04:27:06 PM

Cyberluddite: All of this for around $200 a night--less than half the price I typically pay for a small, ordinary room in a decent hotel in Manhattan.


Also, if you typically pay over $400 for small ordinary rooms in Manhattan you really need to learn to shop around (or you do it on the company guide and don't give a shiat - in which case I don't blame you for being lazy).
 
2013-08-20 04:28:53 PM

lilplatinum: Skyd1v: I agree with you 100%  I mean, just look at this picture I took off the back deck of the hunting cabin last weekend.

Wow, trees AND water?   AND you get to stalk animals with firearms?  Wow, that sure sounds swell!


Trees, water, meat on the hoof, and nobody with attitudes like yours as far as the eye can see.
 
2013-08-20 04:32:27 PM

Skyd1v: lilplatinum: Skyd1v: I agree with you 100%  I mean, just look at this picture I took off the back deck of the hunting cabin last weekend.

Wow, trees AND water?   AND you get to stalk animals with firearms?  Wow, that sure sounds swell!

Trees, water, meat on the hoof, and nobody with attitudes like yours as far as the eye can see.


Works out both ways, people who think stalking and killing things is a good form of entertainment should probably be exiled to our version of siberia anyways.  

/more power to you shooting them anyway, Moose are farking pests.  Always fun when you are late for school and one decides it isn't going to move from your driveway.
 
2013-08-20 04:34:06 PM

lilplatinum: Skyd1v: lilplatinum: Skyd1v: I agree with you 100%  I mean, just look at this picture I took off the back deck of the hunting cabin last weekend.

Wow, trees AND water?   AND you get to stalk animals with firearms?  Wow, that sure sounds swell!

Trees, water, meat on the hoof, and nobody with attitudes like yours as far as the eye can see.

Works out both ways, people who think stalking and killing things is a good form of entertainment should probably be exiled to our version of siberia anyways.

/more power to you shooting them anyway, Moose are farking pests.  Always fun when you are late for school and one decides it isn't going to move from your driveway.


Seems to me there isn't much you WON'T complain about, is there?

img21.imageshack.us
 
2013-08-20 04:35:05 PM

Skyd1v: Seems to me there isn't much you WON'T complain about, is there?


Especially people who go out of the time to post screenshots to show exactly how much displeasure they have at someones opinions.   Those guys are the worst!
 
2013-08-20 04:35:40 PM
Go out of the time?   My english are very good!
 
2013-08-20 04:50:51 PM
i42.tinypic.com
 
2013-08-20 05:20:21 PM

DarwiOdrade: So, still no one saying  "M-Fer, I want more iced tea."


Came here just for that.  Bill O'Reilly, Sociologist.
 
2013-08-20 06:11:51 PM

lilplatinum: Cyberluddite: All of this for around $200 a night--less than half the price I typically pay for a small, ordinary room in a decent hotel in Manhattan.

Also, if you typically pay over $400 for small ordinary rooms in Manhattan you really need to learn to shop around (or you do it on the company guide and don't give a shiat - in which case I don't blame you for being lazy).


Yes, I mostly travel to NYC on business so I'm not concerned about the rate, but at modern, decent-but-not-super-plush hotels (Hyatt, Hilton, Westin sorts of places) the rate for a standard room is generally in the $350-$450 range, for the "guaranteed lowest rate" booked on their websites.  Fancier, more high-end places are even more.  If you actually know of midtown Manhattan hotels in that class that charge less, I'd love to hear about it.
 
2013-08-20 06:23:46 PM

Cyberluddite: Yes, I mostly travel to NYC on business so I'm not concerned about the rate, but at modern, decent-but-not-super-plush hotels (Hyatt, Hilton, Westin sorts of places) the rate for a standard room is generally in the $350-$450 range, for the "guaranteed lowest rate" booked on their websites.  Fancier, more high-end places are even more.  If you actually know of midtown Manhattan hotels in that class that charge less, I'd love to hear about it.


Most of my friends when visiting have been able to book good deals somewhere or another on expedia/priceline in the 200s (or in low-mid 100s if they are willing to stay at a holiday inn express - a room is a room after all).  But yeah, Midtowns always a bit more of a ripoff and I'm sure its seasonal.   Expedia right now has the Sheraton in times square for 215 and NY Hilton midtown for 270 for booking something on a weekend a couple days in the future.

If its your money and you are ever here I highly suggest never going through the hotel websites.    As I said though, if work is paying then just pick whatever is closest to where you have to be.
 
2013-08-20 07:00:26 PM
"America... The way it USED to be!"
 
2013-08-20 07:01:22 PM
They didn't allow my photo of a lynching... It might cause people to question their sentiment.
 
2013-08-20 07:08:15 PM
lilplatinum:   Expedia right now has the Sheraton in times square for 215 and NY Hilton midtown for 270 for booking something on a weekend a couple days in the future.

As I said, I generally travel there on business, which means midweek travel.  I realize weekend rates are significantly lower, but that's irrelevant to me because like other business travelers, I'm generally there midweek, not on weekends.  Which, of course, is precisely why weekend rates are so much lower.

Also, it's seemed to me that rates have increased rather dramatically within the two years or so.  I used to have few problems finding something in the $200-$275 range midweek, but in the last year or so that seems to have become a thing of the past.
 
2013-08-20 07:12:48 PM

Cyberluddite: I realize weekend rates are significantly lower, but that's irrelevant to me because like other business travelers, I'm generally there midweek, not on weekends.  Which, of course, is precisely why weekend rates are so much lower.


Wow weekend rates are actually cheaper in Manhattan, that is the opposite of pretty much everywhere else i've ever been (even business destinations like London IIRC)..    Goes to show how often I go to midtown  :)
 
2013-08-20 07:53:58 PM

lilplatinum: Wow weekend rates are actually cheaper in Manhattan, that is the opposite of pretty much everywhere else i've ever been (even business destinations like London IIRC)..    Goes to show how often I go to midtown  :)


It's true in the "business district" part of most big cities, even if the opposite is usually true outside the business district.  Using your example of London, midweek rates tend to be lower than weekend rates in the more touristy parts of town, but in the "City of London" (i.e, the central financial district, around the Tower Hill and Aldgate tube stations), it's precisely the opposite.  For example, I just checked the best available rates for the first week in October at the place I usually stay in the City of London when I travel there on business, and the weekend rate is £135/night, while the midweek rate is £245/night for the same room.  Unfortunately, pretty much all of Manhattan--or all of midtown anyway--is really considered the "business district," so you won't find deals there mid-week.

Though for places other than Manhattan, this phenomenon can be used to one's advantage if one is traveling for pleasure, rather than business, on weekends--in most big cities, you can save a lot of money buy staying right downtown in the central "business district" on weekends, rather than in the places closest to the weekend tourist areas.  Even in a place like, for example, Los Angeles, if you choose to stay right downtown rather than in Westwood or Santa Monica or Hollywood or West L.A. or some other area where all the tourists flock, you might find a special weekend rate of for $99 on Saturday night in a downtown 4-star luxury hotel that might cost you $400 for the same room on Wednesday night.  Sure, downtown L.A. is kind of a ghost town on weekends, but you get to stay in a really nice place for next to nothing, and just drive to wherever you want to go (any everyone drives everywhere in L.A. anyway).  It beats spending twice as much to stay in some crappy Best Western in Westwood or some other similar nearby location that's deemed to be more "happening" on weekends.
 
2013-08-20 08:08:27 PM

Cyberluddite: Unfortunately, pretty much all of Manhattan--or all of midtown anyway--is really considered the "business district," so you won't find deals there mid-week.


Yeah I never really noticed since I always book my folks at botiques or something here in Brooklyn when they visit and its generally cheaper.  Fortunately really everything is fairly accessible in the city as opposed to a lot of places where you have to worry about driving.
 
2013-08-20 08:58:07 PM

Frank N Stein: Ghastly: Does he mean "Mostly natives and a few crazy whites"?

Alaska has a mostly white population


Northern Exposure has LIED to me!
 
2013-08-20 10:32:37 PM

r1niceboy: Pocket Ninja: It's absolutely true. Everyone in Alaska is content to be snowed in for months at a time with no modern conveniences such as electricity, running water, or the Internet. They live off the fat of the land, hunting moose with black powder rifles and ice fishing. They bury their meat in the ground and smoke it that way. They go on long walks into the wilderness with only bags of rice and a knife to survive, and some of them never come back, and they simply nod at that and explain that "this is Alaska." They share their wives with strangers and when someone grows too ill to survive another winter, he does not complain or whimper about "universal health care;" no, he merely finds an ice floe and sits down upon it and faces west so that he can witness one last sunset, one last beacon of God's creation, before allowing himself to slip silently beneath the waves. Capitalism for an Alaskan consists of bartering bits of bone, wild nuts, and salmon for what necessities he cannot make on his own. They are like Canadians, in some ways, except of course Alaskans cherish freedom and liberty above all things, even life, while Canadians do not. For it is true that long ago God crafted a mold from which he fashioned the earliest pioneers, those rugged individuals who wrenched America from the vast and empty wilderness. When the job was done, God cast that mold aside, into a land where only the strongest and most able could survive. That land was Alaska, and the mold lies there still.

You, sir, are welcome to my wife. She has all her teeth and can cook a mean fish.


blog.commarts.wisc.edu
What a mean fish may look like.
 
2013-08-20 10:39:02 PM

Mr. Shabooboo: Frank N Stein: Mr. Shabooboo: Bill likes his wilderness like he likes his cities

Uneducated
Racist
Sexist
Homophobic
Antisemitic
People in constant fear of their own shadow
Trigger happy

 Just like the good lawrd intended..

How can "wilderness" be any of this things?

Never turn your back on a Larch...Never...


i.chzbgr.com
 
2013-08-20 10:53:42 PM
America like it used to be: getting a check from the government every year.
 
2013-08-21 01:39:27 AM
O'Rly: "This is the way America used to be."

A vast arctic region, covered with ice?

i.ytimg.com
 
2013-08-21 03:18:06 AM
As long as he does not do a live feed from that damned bus outside of Healy, we're cool.  Bring on the money from his followers.  They really can't fark up our politics anymore than they already are.

Political fleecing is nothing new.  The TEA party literally sent a delegation up by cruise ship last election cycle. Hardship pay for the staffers, I'm sure.
 
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