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(CBS DC)   28% of journalism grads wish they'd chosen another career. Only 28%?   (washington.cbslocal.com) divider line 46
    More: Interesting, journalism graduates, national cemeteries, journalisms  
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1148 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Aug 2013 at 11:11 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



46 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-08-19 11:13:20 AM  
Journalism grads are not good with math, so I am sure that number is much larger.
 
2013-08-19 11:13:21 AM  
ONLY 28%?


So sad.
 
2013-08-19 11:15:12 AM  
The other 72% are too busy asking "do you want fries with that?"
 
2013-08-19 11:15:58 AM  
Don't worry, journalism majors. If it makes you feel any better, I double-majored in Electronic Media and Asian Studies, a degree so useless I'm now working as... a journalist.

/and yes I would like fries with that
 
2013-08-19 11:16:33 AM  

limeyfellow: The other 72% are too busy asking "do you want fries with that?"


*shakes fist*
 
2013-08-19 11:17:23 AM  
Subby would be the first person to complain if they didn't get fries with her order.
 
2013-08-19 11:19:16 AM  
My wife went to j-school and got a degree, and is in another field. IMO, even if you don't use it, it's a better prep for tough writing-related fields than a generic degree in "English".

I are not write gud, I rely on her fixes. HONEY PROOFREAD THIS POST.
 
2013-08-19 11:20:14 AM  
Journalism is no longer about research, accuracy, proper grammar, or diction.  Without the communications background, you're done.  So then if you fail to make money off some shiatty blog, your poor skills prevent you from falling back as an executive assistant.  You lose out to the English Lit majors and fight for collating duties with the History majors.
 
2013-08-19 11:21:06 AM  
Well, if they were smart they wouldn't have got as far as graduation before figuring it out

/journalism major - freshman year
 
2013-08-19 11:24:58 AM  
But don't worry, there would totally be enough jobs for everyone if we all got engineering and CIS degrees instead. They won't undercut you with H1-B workers or anything. Engineering and IT are jobs gardens with jobs hanging off every vine, and they grow abundant forever and ever.
 
2013-08-19 11:29:18 AM  
Maybe it's only 28% because research and fact-checking are no longer part of the journalist's repertoire?
 
2013-08-19 11:30:42 AM  

verbaltoxin: But don't worry, there would totally be enough jobs for everyone if we all got engineering and CIS degrees instead. They won't undercut you with H1-B workers or anything. Engineering and IT are jobs gardens with jobs hanging off every vine, and they grow abundant forever and ever.


Harrd Sciencez!!!
 
2013-08-19 11:32:39 AM  

limeyfellow: The other 72% are too busy asking "do you want fries with that?"


I came here to say that in a much less clever way.
 
2013-08-19 11:33:12 AM  
I should've studied accounting instead of switching to communications sophomore year. I drink every night hoping to forget that.
 
2013-08-19 11:33:40 AM  
And 100% of us.
 
2013-08-19 11:42:38 AM  

verbaltoxin: But don't worry, there would totally be enough jobs for everyone if we all got engineering and CIS degrees instead. They won't undercut you with H1-B workers or anything. Engineering and IT are jobs gardens with jobs hanging off every vine, and they grow abundant forever and ever.


...he said, while using a device (and its extensive associated infrastructure) that was invented by EE and CS graduates.

You sound butthurt.
 
2013-08-19 11:46:42 AM  

jtown: limeyfellow: The other 72% are too busy asking "do you want fries with that?"

I came here to say that in a much less clever way.


If I hadn't done it, someone else would have. It is a per-requisite for any thread like this.
 
2013-08-19 11:59:35 AM  
The problem with Journalism degree is that it gives you a wide set of skills that are generic enough on the surface that any moron can say, "I can do that."

This leads to tons of people who aren't terribly good at the job doing the job. This causes a surplus in the labor supply while simultaneously dragging down the quality of the field.

I've got a BS and I can't tell you how many people I've run into in my 16 year career who were "doing" journalism with no proper training or ability. The greatest casualty has been the true reporter. The few greats who are ferret out stories and important information are lost in a sea of tripe. Instead we have a massive number of people doing what looks like reporting but isn't. Most of modern journalism is regurgitation. No one values vomit.

My current job consists of editing press releases and community announcements, and doing page design for weekly newspapers. For more than ten years I was the only person to actually hold a journalism degree in our entire organization. The other person, who earned her degree while working for us, just left.
 
2013-08-19 12:02:02 PM  
sounds about right since about 50% of them dont have a career...
 
2013-08-19 12:02:17 PM  

Cybernetic: verbaltoxin: But don't worry, there would totally be enough jobs for everyone if we all got engineering and CIS degrees instead. They won't undercut you with H1-B workers or anything. Engineering and IT are jobs gardens with jobs hanging off every vine, and they grow abundant forever and ever.

...he said, while using a device (and its extensive associated infrastructure) that was invented by EE and CS graduates.

You sound butthurt.


And shipped around on machines made by ME/EE/AME's propelled by work from ChemE's and all with components including CE work on routes and infrastructure from Civils.

He sounds really butthurt.
 
2013-08-19 12:02:27 PM  

Boudyro: The problem with Journalism degree is that it gives you a wide set of skills that are generic enough on the surface that any moron can say, "I can do that."

This leads to tons of people who aren't terribly good at the job doing the job. This causes a surplus in the labor supply while simultaneously dragging down the quality of the field.

I've got a BS and I can't tell you how many people I've run into in my 16 year career who were "doing" journalism with no proper training or ability. The greatest casualty has been the true reporter. The few greats who are ferret out stories and important information are lost in a sea of tripe. Instead we have a massive number of people doing what looks like reporting but isn't. Most of modern journalism is regurgitation. No one values vomit.

My current job consists of editing press releases and community announcements, and doing page design for weekly newspapers. For more than ten years I was the only person to actually hold a journalism degree in our entire organization. The other person, who earned her degree while working for us, just left.


"The few greats who ferret out stories . . ."

Durr ima copy editor hurr. . .

/ I blame the iPad
 
2013-08-19 12:04:04 PM  
31.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-08-19 12:13:45 PM  

Best Princess Celestia: Cybernetic: verbaltoxin: But don't worry, there would totally be enough jobs for everyone if we all got engineering and CIS degrees instead. They won't undercut you with H1-B workers or anything. Engineering and IT are jobs gardens with jobs hanging off every vine, and they grow abundant forever and ever.

...he said, while using a device (and its extensive associated infrastructure) that was invented by EE and CS graduates.

You sound butthurt.

And shipped around on machines made by ME/EE/AME's propelled by work from ChemE's and all with components including CE work on routes and infrastructure from Civils.

He sounds really butthurt.


Aww, you poor little babes. It was neat to see you sail in and cover your insecurities because of the slightest bit of trolling though.
 
2013-08-19 12:19:10 PM  
As a math/comp sci major who is a developer that currently ran into the brick wall that is "IE doesn't support [x]" for one bazillionth time, journalism is sounding pretty good right about now.

/seriously - validating file size client side before upload ie9 (doesn't support html5 file api).  Possible?  Anybody?
//Bueler?
///F*ck you IE
 
2013-08-19 12:43:44 PM  
There is not shortage of jobs generating content, it's just hard to find one writing news.  Seriously, you have to be a salesperson these days...the writers I know with a flair for business do just fine.
 
2013-08-19 12:49:01 PM  
I don't know what kind of salary they pull down, but the "journalists" in my town have it easy. They just don't report anything.

Seriously. If it doesn't happen within two blocks of the home off
 
2013-08-19 12:50:35 PM  

StopLurkListen: My wife went to j-school and got a degree, and is in another field. IMO, even if you don't use it, it's a better prep for tough writing-related fields than a generic degree in "English".


This is basically what I did. Concentrated in journalism within English, because I didn't think having an "English major" seemed that great, but had no desire to work in journalism. I have a job in a different field where I use my writing/communication skills all the time. If I could do it over, I would have concentrated in business and technical writing instead.
 
2013-08-19 12:53:13 PM  
Farking phone.

If it doesn't happen within two blocks of the office or come off the AP wire, they don't cover it.

Major layoffs last week at my hospital, which is the biggest employer of this city. Local paper prints basically a press release. Newspaper from a bigger city upriver gives a nice story about three sets of layoffs in three years while the CEOs pay continues to increase, the board of directors got raises and we're under investigation by the Dept of Justice.
 
2013-08-19 01:25:09 PM  
I would say another 28% have a career in an unrelated field.

/like me
 
2013-08-19 01:25:24 PM  
I was never asked.  If they did, it would be 29%
 
2013-08-19 01:52:33 PM  
I wish career statistics were made more visible by university departments.  I would never suggest anyone enter my field at anything below the MS/PhD level, and looking for a career with a BS is a total waste of time.
 
2013-08-19 02:02:50 PM  

UDel_Kitty: StopLurkListen: My wife went to j-school and got a degree, and is in another field. IMO, even if you don't use it, it's a better prep for tough writing-related fields than a generic degree in "English".

This is basically what I did. Concentrated in journalism within English, because I didn't think having an "English major" seemed that great, but had no desire to work in journalism. I have a job in a different field where I use my writing/communication skills all the time. If I could do it over, I would have concentrated in business and technical writing instead.


I got a post-graduate diploma in technical writing after university and I wish I'd done that first. It's useful in so many ways. Employment, for one...
 
2013-08-19 02:28:47 PM  

OKObserver: I was never asked.  If they did, it would be 29%


Pretty sure there are more than 100 journalism majors
 
2013-08-19 02:46:06 PM  

Best Princess Celestia: OKObserver: I was never asked.  If they did, it would be 29%

Pretty sure there are more than 100 journalism majors


Journalism major.  Not math major.
 
2013-08-19 03:23:50 PM  
People who can write well actually have great opportunities now. (NOTE: People who can write well and people who majored in journalism do not necessarily overlap.)

I'm a former journalist and newspaper editor who went into online marketing and SEO years ago after being laid off. (No, not spam SEO -- the real "inbound marketing" kind.) There is a lot of demand for people who can write quality blog posts, essays, case studies, and such because Google rewards websites that regularly produce quality, original content. Look into "content marketing."
 
2013-08-19 03:44:09 PM  
Fark: Where high school dropouts make fun of people with degrees.
 
2013-08-19 03:45:01 PM  

bostonguy: People who can write well actually have great opportunities now. (NOTE: People who can write well and people who majored in journalism do not necessarily overlap.)

I'm a former journalist and newspaper editor who went into online marketing and SEO years ago after being laid off. (No, not spam SEO -- the real "inbound marketing" kind.) There is a lot of demand for people who can write quality blog posts, essays, case studies, and such because Google rewards websites that regularly produce quality, original content. Look into "content marketing."


Nice.  Me too.

I kinda fell into the whole marketing thing.  I really wanted to be a newspaper reporter (this was pre-911 when newspapers were still viable and reporters still respected).  But journalism changed so much in the years I was in college that I was no longer interested in it when I graduated.

Marketing and journalism are almost identical.  It was an easy transition for me but I did have to really push hard to convince some of my employers that I could be a marketing pro without any formal training.

I did go back to get an associates degree in web development.  Writing good marketing copy + web skills = job security.
 
2013-08-19 03:50:32 PM  

AtariGod: Writing good marketing copy + web skills = job security.


I cannot emphasize this enough. I can analyze a website for search-engine indexing (XML sitemaps, schema code, and so on) and write the content as well. Plus do social media, PPC campaigns, and more.

Learn these things, and you'll have work. (The technical stuff is not that hard -- I can't code programs or games for the life of me, but SEO stuff is less complicated.) Though the field is becoming more crowded -- best to learn as much as soon as possible.
 
2013-08-19 04:34:04 PM  
But surely we have need of more people to foppishly tell us how Julian Assange, Bradley Manning and Ed Snowden are traitors?
 
2013-08-19 04:50:29 PM  
The other 72% are in advertising/PR/marketing. There are jobs in those fields. And you'll be doing basically the same thing as if you were working in "journalism."

And you'll influence many more people.

Yes, this is kind of depressing. I console myself with a steady paycheck.
 
2013-08-19 05:00:22 PM  
www.poynter.org
 
2013-08-19 09:40:26 PM  
Still beats getting a real job.

/working in newspapers since 1997
//I'm just as surprised by that as you are.
 
2013-08-19 09:45:06 PM  
Yeah, the 28% who haven't started working yet.
/30 years in the biz. Now out.
//It's a miserable existence. Pressure, pay scale, hours, and a ton of dipshi*t editors who can't write worth a damn.
 
2013-08-20 12:10:37 AM  
I've been a copy editor at a paper since 2000. I have to sling drinks at a bar on the side just to afford my alcoholism.

/not joking
//should have stayed in elementary education
 
2013-08-20 01:15:00 AM  

verbaltoxin: But don't worry, there would totally be enough jobs for everyone if we all got engineering and CIS degrees instead. They won't undercut you with H1-B workers or anything. Engineering and IT are jobs gardens with jobs hanging off every vine, and they grow abundant forever and ever.


THIS THIS THIS.  Everyone tells you to get a degree in engineering or CS because jobs jobs jobs, but then they brought in H1-Bs and started offshoring everything and now our unemployment rate has exploded to 4 percent.
 
2013-08-20 02:22:51 AM  
Most writing jobs pay only slightly more than flipping burgers. If you work really hard and can get in on the staff of a publication that pays decent, you still only make about as much as an executive admin. As a journalist, I made as much money as I did managing a retail store, but working in retail meant a lot less stress. Many places these days want content, whether it's a website or startup, but they are not willing to pay squat for it. I have had offers for jobs that paid $25 a post, which turned out to be about $6 an hour for my time to do it. No thanks. Now I do some freelance work on the side and work a retail job while still trying to get into marketing communications or public relations. The problem is that online content is a constant stream of nonsense with no time to go anywhere or do any real in-person research to produce quality stories. Your phone is your best friend. I once had to write an 'earnings' story on Symantec and my competitors at eWeek had a story posted before the earnings call was even over. That was one of the last things I did while working full time on staff at a publication. I thought that was insane since the CEO was still throwing out good quotes.
 
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