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(CNN)   Mars One project: More than 100,000 people want to go to Mars and not return. GrumpyCat: that's a good start   (cnn.com) divider line 58
    More: Amusing, Colonization of Mars, martian soil, orbiting the Earth, manned missions, health sciences, solar minimum, cosmic microwave background, confined space  
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1468 clicks; posted to Geek » on 17 Aug 2013 at 9:38 PM (49 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-17 09:18:28 PM
Well, let's see. If 1 person can live on 10 bodies for a year, after the first year their would be  about 9091 left alive. After the second year 826 left, the third year 75, the fourth year 6 or 7, then that last guy will starve close to the middle of the 5th year having eaten only 5 or 6.
 
2013-08-17 09:51:59 PM
Wait til they find out how slow their internet connection will be.
 
2013-08-17 09:54:57 PM
he idea is for it to be funded by sponsors and media that will pay for broadcasting rights of shows and movies documenting everything from the astronauts' training on Earth to their deployment and colonization of Mars.

A reality show set on a spacecraft? It's been done.

www.scificool.com
 
2013-08-17 09:56:16 PM
It's cool, they should be able to 3D print everything they need.

/Sorry, couldn't resist
 
2013-08-17 10:05:55 PM
I didn't know we had that many telephone sanitizers.
 
2013-08-17 10:22:19 PM
Mrs. Niceboy tells me that she wouldn't like to live on Mars. I tell her that I don't particularly like living on Earth.
 
2013-08-17 10:28:50 PM
They should pick only lawyers.
 
2013-08-17 10:29:42 PM
i.qkme.me
 
2013-08-17 10:33:39 PM
Every single time I hear about it being a one-way trip, I think about how people immigrating to America from around the world were pretty much on a one-way trip. Just not quite as remote.

A few thousand millennia from now, it'll be the same thing if/when we are on the verge of reliable travel to Andromeda or Canis Major.
 
2013-08-17 10:35:37 PM

fusillade762: A reality show set on a spacecraft? It's been done.


I was thinking more like...

i.imgur.com

Just  tell them we're sending them to Mars.  Much cheaper, we still get our reality show, and then when the ratings tank, we can just eradicate them because that's what they signed up for in the first place.
 
2013-08-17 10:36:38 PM
Please let most of them be politicians and lawyers. Oh and throw in the Koch brothers and Honey Boo Boo the rest of us will demand the mission be expedited.
 
2013-08-17 10:43:05 PM
I would like to nominate 637 (535 + 100 + 2) for the one way trip.

And let's keep at least a few telephone sanitizers around.
 
2013-08-17 10:44:01 PM

Hawnkee: Every single time I hear about it being a one-way trip, I think about how people immigrating to America from around the world were pretty much on a one-way trip. Just not quite as remote


16th century Europeans only had to worry about surviving the sea voyage.

After that they could farm and hunt.
 
2013-08-17 11:14:07 PM

Nina_Hartley's_Ass: Wait til they find out how slow their internet connection will be.


That.  99,992 of these 'candidates' don't fundamentally grasp that they'll never again have cable, Netflix, FARK, and online porn, much less doritos, cheetos, milk or steak.
 
2013-08-17 11:19:47 PM
Humans in space luddites 3D printers!!!
 
2013-08-17 11:20:45 PM
While it's a great idea, I can't see it happening within a decade. The only feasible way I can see a successful colonization is if there is a 'safety valve' in being able to return. Also, before we can do this, we need more in-space infrastructure if anything to supply fuel and other volatiles extracted from the NEOs. It will also mean that we'd need nuclear energy (either engines or for power) to make up for losses solar experiences.

The only way I can see it happening is if we either lasso an asteroid and alter its orbit in a 'cycler' and make use of its mass as shielding, or disassemble one and create a large Oberth wheel and do the same thing. I ain't talking 3D printing here, it'd be processing and reconstituting raw materials in familiar forms like concrete and rebar. In microgravity, zero atmosphere, and harmful solar radiation ( it won't be built in LEO, that's for sure). This effort alone could take a decade or more after the beginning of true orbital industry.

The upside is that it's almost eternally reusable, large enough to be at least partially self-sustainable, and provides a ride home for those who just aren't ready for the new frontier. With something like that, it wouldn't be all that hard to use stuff like we can already do (landers and return modules). Here's a link, apologies for it being Wikipedia, but the external links are sound. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mars_cycler
 
2013-08-17 11:22:40 PM
Enjoy shiatting into a vacuum tube, guys.
 
2013-08-17 11:28:59 PM

Radak: fusillade762: A reality show set on a spacecraft? It's been done.

I was thinking more like...

[i.imgur.com image 604x340]

Just  tell them we're sending them to Mars.  Much cheaper, we still get our reality show, and then when the ratings tank, we can just eradicate them because that's what they signed up for in the first place.


That sounds more like the plot of this movie:

cf.badassdigest.com
 
2013-08-17 11:40:16 PM

fusillade762: That sounds more like the plot of this movie


Essentially.  (Love that movie btw.)  But these are just normal people, completely unaware of the fact that they're not actually going to Mars, and they're put on TV for our entertainment.  Surely it would be much easier to pull this off than actually sending people to Mars.
 
2013-08-17 11:41:23 PM
I do sarcastically like the religious christian propaganda that is going with this whole affair. Religion considers going to Mars to be suicide, so fark you, you are not going.

Propaganda: Before you leave Earth or when you get to Mars, look left and then look right. Those people are going to kill you if you don't kill them first.
 
2013-08-17 11:41:59 PM

dualplains: Nina_Hartley's_Ass: Wait til they find out how slow their internet connection will be.

That.  99,992 of these 'candidates' don't fundamentally grasp that they'll never again have cable, Netflix, FARK, and online porn, much less doritos, cheetos, milk or steak.


HA! That's the least of it!

They will be drinking recycled water (i.e. their own piss and used water). They probably won't be able to have sex (because they're not going to be on a space station, but in a ship which will require them to be in their spacesuits most of the time, not to mention the fact that doing it in zero-g is very difficult, and the release of bodily fluids in zero gravity is ill-advised). Their food selection will consist of dehydrated EVERYTHING... They will never again have milk, cheese, fresh meat, baked bread, or pastries. The supply of fresh vegetables and fruits will be extremely limited even IF they plan for indoor gardening. Entertainment will be extremely limited. Medicine will be in limited supply, so getting sick is a VERY bad thing even if you have doctors around. Sleeping is difficult and not very restful in zero or very low gravity. Every single act of grooming that you take for granted on Earth is RIDICULOUSLY complicated in space: Shiatting requires a vacuum to suck the crap out of you. Showers are not possible, and neither are baths. Plucking wayward hairs is out. Spraying deodorant is a bad idea. Clipping your nails requires that vacuum again. And I don't even want to think about how downright HORRIBLE menstruation would be in zero gravity.  There's no relaxing in a chair or bed; You have to be strapped in to avoid floating away. If your vision gets worse, there's nobody out there to grind eyeglass lenses for you; You suffer with poor vision. If your teeth break, there's no way to get them fixed. If your bones break, the healing process in low gravity or zero gravity is EXCRUCIATING and slow.

Outside the ship there's no air, and it's freezing cold. The tiniest pinhole in your ship's hull could mean your death. IF even ONE person in your compliment is a stupid fark-up, you can count of dying in space-- Probably by freezing or asphyxiation or decompression.

So yeah... Go on, dumb-asses. Have fun playing Buck Rogers.
 
2013-08-17 11:43:06 PM

jaytkay: Hawnkee: Every single time I hear about it being a one-way trip, I think about how people immigrating to America from around the world were pretty much on a one-way trip. Just not quite as remote

16th century Europeans only had to worry about surviving the sea voyage.

After that they could farm and hunt.




That's what some of the early settles thought, but it didn't always end that way.
Actually, while the conditions might be much more harsh, believe modern settlers of mars will at least have alot more information and a greater chance of success than many early earth colonists had. If only for the technology and experience gained.

No ones setting a permanent foot out there until decades worth of studies and trial runs ave been conducted. We will have a fairly good idea of what to expect and how to survive.

Alot of colonists on earth died because people assumed they could just go and live somewhere without thinking about things like what they should Farm or what diseases they might be exposed to. All while being just as stuck as any astronaut would.
 
2013-08-17 11:43:42 PM
The radiation part seems to be a tough nut to crack.  From what I gather there are not many ways to get around the mass needed to protect a being.  On top of that from what I understand Mars has no internal dynamo and thus no real magnetic field, so even once you're out of space and on the planet there will still be radiation to deal with.  I also understand that electronics don't like long term radiation either, and something sent out to space will need to be tough enough to last several generations.

The idea of living on mars sounds rad (no pun), but until lightweight and longterm answers to radiation are figured out, or even better; hardening our very bodies against it, I'm not sure I want to be out from under our lovely magnetic field for very long.
 
2013-08-17 11:46:17 PM
And let me point out that despite what TFA says, "dental upkeep" is not the same as "dental surgery".
 
2013-08-17 11:48:35 PM

way south: jaytkay: Hawnkee: Every single time I hear about it being a one-way trip, I think about how people immigrating to America from around the world were pretty much on a one-way trip. Just not quite as remote

16th century Europeans only had to worry about surviving the sea voyage.

After that they could farm and hunt.

That's what some of the early settles thought, but it didn't always end that way.
Actually, while the conditions might be much more harsh, believe modern settlers of mars will at least have alot more information and a greater chance of success than many early earth colonists had. If only for the technology and experience gained.

No ones setting a permanent foot out there until decades worth of studies and trial runs ave been conducted. We will have a fairly good idea of what to expect and how to survive.

Alot of colonists on earth died because people assumed they could just go and live somewhere without thinking about things like what they should Farm or what diseases they might be exposed to. All while being just as stuck as any astronaut would.


BUT WITHOUT AIR, GRAVITY, OR PROTECTION FROM RADIATION.
 
2013-08-17 11:58:33 PM
I am a bit on the fence about a trip like going to Mars.  I mean, livestock would be damn near impossible to load onto a space craft, so bacon supplies would be very limited.  You'd have to approach it they way I play Minecraft.  Land, dig underground and expand underground.  That should protect everyone from the radiation and possibly even find sources for oxygen.  The limiting factor would be the oxygen.

But, on the other side, there is the whole idea of creating a new society in a place that can not be touched by any Earth government.  A chance to be a founding father of a new civilization where we can learn from the mistakes of our own Founding Fathers and correct some mistakes  "The Second Amendment gives all Martians the right to use fire arms and particle weapons for self defense", "Martians have the right not to have the police to just barge into their homes via a no knock warrant", "All Martians have the right to not be spied on by their government in any form, including drones, internet, telecommunications and GPS devices".  "The Bill of Rights can not be limited or eliminated, not one single right, not all of them, nor can they be limited ever, any Martian leader who says that the Bill of Rights must be limited in order for the government to properly govern, that leader is to step down at once."
 
2013-08-18 12:05:14 AM
Space sucks.
 
2013-08-18 12:05:35 AM
I didn't know this movie had such a profound effect on some people...
www.omega-level.net
 
2013-08-18 12:11:29 AM
Isn't this the scam where you had pay an application fee of $49.95 or something like that?
 
2013-08-18 12:54:08 AM

KarmicDisaster: Well, let's see. If 1 person can live on 10 bodies for a year, after the first year their would be  about 9091 left alive. After the second year 826 left, the third year 75, the fourth year 6 or 7, then that last guy will starve close to the middle of the 5th year having eaten only 5 or 6.


You are aptly named
 
2013-08-18 01:56:55 AM
There is nothing impossible about this. I expect their timeline to stretch a couple years, but I think it will happen. There are currently workable solutions today,to every problem you naysayers have posed.
 
2013-08-18 02:04:05 AM

Wrencher: There is nothing impossible about this. I expect their timeline to stretch a couple years, but I think it will happen. There are currently workable solutions today,to every problem you naysayers have posed.


Of course it can be done. This just happens to be the most stupid, ill-conceived way of doing it.
 
2013-08-18 03:19:37 AM
constablechaos.files.wordpress.com

Ready to command the mission
 
2013-08-18 03:28:56 AM

omg bbq: From what I gather there are not many ways to get around the mass needed to protect a being.


If only magnetic fields could deflect radiation.
 
2013-08-18 03:54:23 AM
actually it's very comfortable to sleep in zero G.
 
2013-08-18 03:59:04 AM
 
2013-08-18 04:21:41 AM
Honestly I'd be all for it if it wasn't going to be treated like a reality TV show.
 
2013-08-18 04:36:11 AM

ZeroCorpse: way south: jaytkay: Hawnkee: Every single time I hear about it being a one-way trip, I think about how people immigrating to America from around the world were pretty much on a one-way trip. Just not quite as remote

16th century Europeans only had to worry about surviving the sea voyage.

After that they could farm and hunt.

That's what some of the early settles thought, but it didn't always end that way.
Actually, while the conditions might be much more harsh, believe modern settlers of mars will at least have alot more information and a greater chance of success than many early earth colonists had. If only for the technology and experience gained.

No ones setting a permanent foot out there until decades worth of studies and trial runs ave been conducted. We will have a fairly good idea of what to expect and how to survive.

Alot of colonists on earth died because people assumed they could just go and live somewhere without thinking about things like what they should Farm or what diseases they might be exposed to. All while being just as stuck as any astronaut would.

BUT WITHOUT AIR, GRAVITY, OR PROTECTION FROM RADIATION.




Mars has gravity, and many believe there is enough water to be found for machines to provide air. Reducing the radiation threat can be done with smart engineering.
The point is that we know about these problems and have plans on how to solve them. Which is a better place to be than on a ship to South America without a treatment for malaria (or even a clue wtf a microscopic parasite is).
 
2013-08-18 06:24:11 AM
Grumpy cat is only right if all of the people are lawyers
 
2013-08-18 07:31:48 AM

omg bbq: The radiation part seems to be a tough nut to crack.  From what I gather there are not many ways to get around the mass needed to protect a being.  On top of that from what I understand Mars has no internal dynamo and thus no real magnetic field, so even once you're out of space and on the planet there will still be radiation to deal with.  I also understand that electronics don't like long term radiation either, and something sent out to space will need to be tough enough to last several generations.

The idea of living on mars sounds rad (no pun), but until lightweight and longterm answers to radiation are figured out, or even better; hardening our very bodies against it, I'm not sure I want to be out from under our lovely magnetic field for very long.


If you build the habitat structures underground, a couple meters of soil should be sufficient to protect against most radiation. Anything capable of penetrating the bunker walls could be dealt with by having a safe room wrapped in a large water tank (and you're going to need a large water cistern anyway). As long as there's not a solar storm going or a massive spike in cosmic rays, you'll be no worse off for cancer risk than a career airline pilot or an Antarctic researcher. It's not like Mars is bathed in gamma rays or something; ionizing radiation is well within our technology to protect against.
 While you're out and about on the surface doing science, you'll need to keep trips short and possibly have some kind of mobile hazard shelter (which would likely need to be constructed in situ, since we'd have trouble dropping a vehicle of that size onto Mars; fortunately Martian soil contains plenty of aluminum and iron which can be used for manufacturing).


Given time, the colonists could erect a magnetic field generator to provide a local "bubble" to protect their settlement. As the colony grows, additional generators are networked, creating an overlapping shield grid that can pick up the slack if one of the units fails. Once a magnetic shield is in place you can start building greenhouse structures on the surface for agriculture. At that point the colony would make a massive leap in self-sufficiency.

As far as electronics go, I think Spirit and Opportunity are testament enough to our capacity to produce computers capable of surviving the Martian environment.
 
2013-08-18 09:16:06 AM
I'm perfectly fine with this, as long as The Believers don't get to go.

/let's not taint the rest of the galaxy
 
2013-08-18 10:18:29 AM
I like the idea of sending robots ahead to begin construction on a colony.
What natural resources does mars have?
 
2013-08-18 11:37:11 AM
Let's start with the ones from Texas first.
 
2013-08-18 12:01:16 PM

jaytkay: Hawnkee: Every single time I hear about it being a one-way trip, I think about how people immigrating to America from around the world were pretty much on a one-way trip. Just not quite as remote

16th century Europeans only had to worry about surviving the sea voyage.

After that they could farm and hunt.


But to be fair, that sea voyage was a hell of a lot more dangerous than even a trip to Mars in a space ship built by low-bid Russian contractors.
 
2013-08-18 12:17:59 PM

OhioKnight: jaytkay: Hawnkee: Every single time I hear about it being a one-way trip, I think about how people immigrating to America from around the world were pretty much on a one-way trip. Just not quite as remote

16th century Europeans only had to worry about surviving the sea voyage.

After that they could farm and hunt.

But to be fair, that sea voyage was a hell of a lot more dangerous than even a trip to Mars in a space ship built by low-bid Russian contractors.


notsureifserious.jpg

What about O2?  From what I gather, the O2 that the travelers will have to breathe will have to be transported along with them along the trip.  Plus the amount of O2 on Mars is negligible, so they will have to find some way to produce it.  Because of just that, I'll take the sea voyage any day.
 
2013-08-18 12:38:39 PM

Mad_Radhu: It's cool, they should be able to 3D print everything they need.

/Sorry, couldn't resist


What's to resist? It's so obviously the future because a scientist was wrong once and computers, you Luddite.
 
2013-08-18 12:46:44 PM

PsyLord: OhioKnight: jaytkay: Hawnkee: Every single time I hear about it being a one-way trip, I think about how people immigrating to America from around the world were pretty much on a one-way trip. Just not quite as remote

16th century Europeans only had to worry about surviving the sea voyage.

After that they could farm and hunt.

But to be fair, that sea voyage was a hell of a lot more dangerous than even a trip to Mars in a space ship built by low-bid Russian contractors.

notsureifserious.jpg

What about O2?  From what I gather, the O2 that the travelers will have to breathe will have to be transported along with them along the trip.  Plus the amount of O2 on Mars is negligible, so they will have to find some way to produce it.  Because of just that, I'll take the sea voyage any day.


The general idea is to create it from water once they're on Mars.  That's why it's so important to find liquid water up there.  With enough power you can separate the oxygen from the hydrogen and use the hydrogen for fuel.
 
2013-08-18 12:47:56 PM

OhioKnight: jaytkay: Hawnkee: Every single time I hear about it being a one-way trip, I think about how people immigrating to America from around the world were pretty much on a one-way trip. Just not quite as remote

16th century Europeans only had to worry about surviving the sea voyage.

After that they could farm and hunt.

But to be fair, that sea voyage was a hell of a lot more dangerous than even a trip to Mars in a space ship built by low-bid Russian contractors.


Uhh, yeah, that's completely and totally untrue.
 
2013-08-18 01:24:52 PM

dualplains: PsyLord: OhioKnight: jaytkay: Hawnkee: Every single time I hear about it being a one-way trip, I think about how people immigrating to America from around the world were pretty much on a one-way trip. Just not quite as remote

16th century Europeans only had to worry about surviving the sea voyage.

After that they could farm and hunt.

But to be fair, that sea voyage was a hell of a lot more dangerous than even a trip to Mars in a space ship built by low-bid Russian contractors.

notsureifserious.jpg

What about O2?  From what I gather, the O2 that the travelers will have to breathe will have to be transported along with them along the trip.  Plus the amount of O2 on Mars is negligible, so they will have to find some way to produce it.  Because of just that, I'll take the sea voyage any day.

The general idea is to create it from water once they're on Mars.  That's why it's so important to find liquid water up there.  With enough power you can separate the oxygen from the hydrogen and use the hydrogen for fuel.


But they won't find enough, most likely, and they'll end up dying on Mars.

Or on the trip there, which is mainly what I was talking about earlier.

Or maybe they'll get lucky and survive. Just. And maybe they'll even build a colony... But with the resources they have at hand, and the type of work they'll need to do to make it livable, if they are able to procreate and form a colony of Martian Humans those folks will be like a bunch of backwater Mars hillbillies. They'll lose a lot of what it is to be human, growing up in a colony unable to leave or interact with anyone besides their fellow colonists.

And that leads to another ethical question: Let's say they do succeed in colonizing. They live out their lives there. They have babies (defying all logic that says that's a really bad idea)... How fair is it to birth a child into that life? Don't you think the second generation of Mars folks would be an angry, pissed-off, bitter bunch of people? Or maybe just a crazy, isolated, home-schooled variety of nutbags? It seems kind of evil to force a generation to grow up in that setting and not give them a choice.

But of course, this is all speculation. Personally, I think a few will die on the trip there, and then speaking optimistically, the rest will die within a year of landing on Mars. The majority will be dead within six months.
 
2013-08-18 01:26:55 PM

dualplains: OhioKnight: jaytkay: Hawnkee: Every single time I hear about it being a one-way trip, I think about how people immigrating to America from around the world were pretty much on a one-way trip. Just not quite as remote

16th century Europeans only had to worry about surviving the sea voyage.

After that they could farm and hunt.

But to be fair, that sea voyage was a hell of a lot more dangerous than even a trip to Mars in a space ship built by low-bid Russian contractors.

Uhh, yeah, that's completely and totally untrue.


You overestimate the safety of 16th century sea voyages.
 
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