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(FastCo Design)   The entire comic book cosmos explained in infographics that would even impress Reed Richards   (fastcodesign.com ) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Robert Crumb, infographics, data visualization, Scrooge McDuck, Uncle Scrooge, lists of films, personal statement, comics  
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5620 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Aug 2013 at 8:47 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



29 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-08-16 08:39:34 PM  
WTF is this thing?
 
2013-08-16 08:46:57 PM  
Holy Rain Man
 
2013-08-16 08:52:25 PM  
Thanks subby, I have a new RSS feed to add to my 'infographic' category.

// gets to look at stuff like this because it's work related :D
 
2013-08-16 08:53:12 PM  
That site is shiat on my iPad.
 
2013-08-16 08:58:21 PM  

INeedAName: That site is shiat on my iPad.


Glad I'm not alone in this predicament
 
2013-08-16 09:27:37 PM  
shiat here too and I'm on a vanilla desktop.
 
2013-08-16 09:36:37 PM  
If that covered more than just what it shown there, made into a coffee table book, that dude would be a millionaire in a relatively short time. I even think it's damn cool and I'm not even into comics.
 
2013-08-16 09:38:05 PM  

INeedAName: That site is shiat on my iPad.


Son, you shiat on your iPad, and you'll ruin it. That Del Taco will eat right through tempered glass.
 
2013-08-16 09:44:56 PM  
8.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-08-16 09:59:19 PM  

OhioUGrad: If that covered more than just what it shown there, made into a coffee table book, that dude would be a millionaire in a relatively short time. I even think it's damn cool and I'm not even into comics.


Amazon says its 196 pages, so I assume that's the case.

I picked it up, 14 bucks, 16 with shipping ain't bad at all for something that's definitely interesting as a semi-comic book fan.
 
2013-08-16 10:04:45 PM  
Cosmos might work as a comic book...
 
2013-08-16 10:07:01 PM  

ZeroCorpse: WTF is this thing?


It's a FAIL, old chum!

img.photobucket.com
 
2013-08-16 10:14:12 PM  
Underwear on the outside: Colossus, Aquaman...WTF

Briefs as outer layer of costume vs briefs worn directly on the skin (metal and whatnot). Get your tropes right.

Also...Venn diagram of costume/costume/origin is not very enlightening.
 
2013-08-16 10:15:09 PM  
The problem I have with comic books is that there are so many different versions of the same characters, alternate universes, alternate realities, alternate timelines, reboots, crossovers that are canon, crossovers that aren't canon, guest writer events, etc, that it's really impossible to keep track of who is who and what is what without being willing to spend hundreds if not thousands of dollars on all of these comics just to get comprehensive knowledge of what's going on.

I can't start watching a TV series if I miss the first episode.  I either watch every bit from the start, or I wait until it's available on DVD so that I don't miss anything.  I want to see The Avengers, but I haven't seen any of the Iron Man movies, Thor movies, Captain America, or Hulk, and I don't want to see it until I've already seen all of the other movies that set the characters up.

I don't think I'm meant for comics, which is a shame, because I really like the characters, and I love sci-fi, so a lot of it seems like it would fit my interests.
 
2013-08-16 10:57:47 PM  

hammer85: OhioUGrad: If that covered more than just what it shown there, made into a coffee table book, that dude would be a millionaire in a relatively short time. I even think it's damn cool and I'm not even into comics.

Amazon says its 196 pages, so I assume that's the case.

I picked it up, 14 bucks, 16 with shipping ain't bad at all for something that's definitely interesting as a semi-comic book fan.


That's not bad at all, but I wonder if they'll make it into a bit of a bigger coffee table book version with a hard cover. 9x7 doesn't seem that big for some of the detail.
 
2013-08-16 11:07:52 PM  
Well, before I saw that, I was feeling pretty bad about how I'd wasted my life. But after seeing what some folks do with their time, I'm feeling pretty perky again
 
2013-08-16 11:27:26 PM  
Impress Reed Richards?  That's a bit of a stretch.
 
2013-08-17 12:19:00 AM  

HighOnCraic: Impress Reed Richards?  That's a bit of a stretch.


ba dum chsssz
 
2013-08-17 12:41:28 AM  
Go ahead. Explain these with an info graphic. I dare you.

24.media.tumblr.com


static.comicvine.com

img11.imageshack.us

1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-08-17 01:02:48 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: The problem I have with comic books is that there are so many different versions of the same characters, alternate universes, alternate realities, alternate timelines, reboots, crossovers that are canon, crossovers that aren't canon, guest writer events, etc, that it's really impossible to keep track of who is who and what is what without being willing to spend hundreds if not thousands of dollars on all of these comics just to get comprehensive knowledge of what's going on.


If check out a few key story arcs and miniseries, they are a good place to start. On the Marvel side of things is it almost better to start with the Ultimates line, which is closer to the Marvel Cinematic Universe and brach out from there with characters you like. On the DC side of things, there a few key stories that are a good place to start. On the Superman side, I'd recommend The Man of Steel, Birthright, and A Superman for All Seasons and on the Batman side I'd check out Year One, The Long Halloween, Dark Victory, and The Killing Joke, which are some nice self-contained stories without a lot of continuity to keep up with like you run into with Knightfall. From there, there are a lot of interesting alternate-continuity stories that are good, like All-Star Superman, The Dark Knight Returns, The New Frontier, and Red Son.

If you step outside of the DC and Marvel superhero world, there are a lot of good comics that tell complete stories with a beginning, a middle, and an end. Sandman, Preacher, Transmetropolitan, Y: The Last Man, The Boys, Irredeemable/Incorruptible, Rising Stars, and Locke and Key. There are also a ton of great ongoing series right now that are also likely to have a definite ending at some point, like Fables, Unwritten, The Manhattan Projects, Saga, Morning Glories, Revival, The Walking Dead, Fatale, and Mind the Gap. The super hero stuff is raking it in at the box office right now, but there are some REALLY good stories being told outside of the typical superhero stories.
 
2013-08-17 01:13:36 AM  

Mad_Radhu: TuteTibiImperes: The problem I have with comic books is that there are so many different versions of the same characters, alternate universes, alternate realities, alternate timelines, reboots, crossovers that are canon, crossovers that aren't canon, guest writer events, etc, that it's really impossible to keep track of who is who and what is what without being willing to spend hundreds if not thousands of dollars on all of these comics just to get comprehensive knowledge of what's going on.

If check out a few key story arcs and miniseries, they are a good place to start. On the Marvel side of things is it almost better to start with the Ultimates line, which is closer to the Marvel Cinematic Universe and brach out from there with characters you like. On the DC side of things, there a few key stories that are a good place to start. On the Superman side, I'd recommend The Man of Steel, Birthright, and A Superman for All Seasons and on the Batman side I'd check out Year One, The Long Halloween, Dark Victory, and The Killing Joke, which are some nice self-contained stories without a lot of continuity to keep up with like you run into with Knightfall. From there, there are a lot of interesting alternate-continuity stories that are good, like All-Star Superman, The Dark Knight Returns, The New Frontier, and Red Son.

If you step outside of the DC and Marvel superhero world, there are a lot of good comics that tell complete stories with a beginning, a middle, and an end. Sandman, Preacher, Transmetropolitan, Y: The Last Man, The Boys, Irredeemable/Incorruptible, Rising Stars, and Locke and Key. There are also a ton of great ongoing series right now that are also likely to have a definite ending at some point, like Fables, Unwritten, The Manhattan Projects, Saga, Morning Glories, Revival, The Walking Dead, Fatale, and Mind the Gap. The super hero stuff is raking it in at the box office right now, but there are some REALLY good stories being told outside of the typical sup ...


Thanks for the recommendations, I'll have to check them out.

I picked followed a few comic series as a kid for short periods of time, and I remember liking Silver Surfer a lot.  I also remember having a very thick graphic book (like easily ten comics in one volume) that was the story of Thanos on some floating space platform waging war against the world and some huge crossover that involved Silver Surfer, either Punisher or Ghost Rider (or maybe both) and a bunch of other characters battling him.  It was pretty cool.

I was a big Buffy fan and I know Whedon has continued the series through Dark Horse comics, but part of me still feels ripped off when it comes to comic books - you spend $3-$4 on something that has cool art, but little in the way of content, I mean, comic books are pretty short reads.

I should give it another go though, at least you've given me some ideas of where to start, thanks!
 
2013-08-17 01:26:12 AM  
Impress Richard Reed? What was it, a set of self exploding Reeboks?
 
2013-08-17 01:43:31 AM  

Mad_Radhu: TuteTibiImperes: The problem I have with comic books is that there are so many different versions of the same characters, alternate universes, alternate realities, alternate timelines, reboots, crossovers that are canon, crossovers that aren't canon, guest writer events, etc, that it's really impossible to keep track of who is who and what is what without being willing to spend hundreds if not thousands of dollars on all of these comics just to get comprehensive knowledge of what's going on.

If check out a few key story arcs and miniseries, they are a good place to start. On the Marvel side of things is it almost better to start with the Ultimates line, which is closer to the Marvel Cinematic Universe and brach out from there with characters you like. On the DC side of things, there a few key stories that are a good place to start. On the Superman side, I'd recommend The Man of Steel, Birthright, and A Superman for All Seasons and on the Batman side I'd check out Year One, The Long Halloween, Dark Victory, and The Killing Joke, which are some nice self-contained stories without a lot of continuity to keep up with like you run into with Knightfall. From there, there are a lot of interesting alternate-continuity stories that are good, like All-Star Superman, The Dark Knight Returns, The New Frontier, and Red Son.

If you step outside of the DC and Marvel superhero world, there are a lot of good comics that tell complete stories with a beginning, a middle, and an end. Sandman, Preacher, Transmetropolitan, Y: The Last Man, The Boys, Irredeemable/Incorruptible, Rising Stars, and Locke and Key. There are also a ton of great ongoing series right now that are also likely to have a definite ending at some point, like Fables, Unwritten, The Manhattan Projects, Saga, Morning Glories, Revival, The Walking Dead, Fatale, and Mind the Gap. The super hero stuff is raking it in at the box office right now, but there are some REALLY good stories being told outside of the typical sup ...


Try looking at some of the alternative publications, like Elfquest, Cerebus, American Flagg, Groo, and Nexus.

/I'm old, so I'm guessing that there have been some other interesting alternative titles since the mid- to late-80s.
//Get off my lawn!
 
2013-08-17 01:53:10 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: I was a big Buffy fan and I know Whedon has continued the series through Dark Horse comics, but part of me still feels ripped off when it comes to comic books - you spend $3-$4 on something that has cool art, but little in the way of content, I mean, comic books are pretty short reads.


You can get back issues of some comics pretty cheaply at your local comic store, plus collected trades are not bad either, especially if you go through Amazon. If you have a tablet, I'd also check out the Comixology and Kindle stores, as both often have deals where you can get single issues for $1 each and collected editions for $4-$5. Just this week, I took advantage of a Comixology sale to get into Mind the Gap by grabbing the collections of 1-5 and 5-10 for $4 and $5 respectively. There's also often first issues available for free as well, like here.

I hate to not be supporting my local store, or to sound like a Comixology shill, but I REALLY like there service. It got me back into comics after about a decade away, with a combination of great sales and real convenience (it's nice to roll out of bed at 6 AM on Wednesday and have the latest issues waiting for me to read over breakfast). It's a really good service, but I feel a little conflicted about it because it is probably the final nail in the coffin of the local comic store because the digital issues actually look better than the paper versions if you have a nice tablet (I use a Nook HD+ with a 9" 1080p screen). The only big downside to buying digital is that you don't see the comics appreciate. For example, I bought Saga the first day it came out in digital, and my digital copy is worth nothing, while a paper copy first printing is worth $75 and up depending on the condition and cover variant.
 
2013-08-17 02:26:34 AM  

HighOnCraic: Try looking at some of the alternative publications, like Elfquest, Cerebus, American Flagg, Groo, and Nexus.

/I'm old, so I'm guessing that there have been some other interesting alternative titles since the mid- to late-80s.
//Get off my lawn!


If you have been out of the game for a while, wouldn't believe the kind of stories that have been told since. It is a golden age of good-quality "alternative" comics. Throughout the 90s, DC's Vertigo line had a ton of great non-mainstream stuff. Lately, Image has currently cornered the market on the non-traditional comic stories, with a range of really interesting stories.
 
2013-08-17 08:32:47 AM  
So, is Wonder Woman a lezbo or not?
 
2013-08-17 12:01:26 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: The problem I have with comic books is that there are so many different versions of the same characters, alternate universes, alternate realities, alternate timelines, reboots, crossovers that are canon, crossovers that aren't canon, guest writer events, etc, that it's really impossible to keep track of who is who and what is what without being willing to spend hundreds if not thousands of dollars on all of these comics just to get comprehensive knowledge of what's going on.


That's why I stopped reading comics.  I lived in Charleston SC and bought my last comic the month before hurricane hugo came through and trashed the state.  Like everyone I know, the power was out for a week or more, we had trees on the roof and most of the shingles were gone.  It was months before I even thought about buying a comic again because there was so much going on I just never got around to it.  Well, at the time marvel was on a big crossover kick and the only way to keep up was to buy everything every month and I just wasn't willing to commit to that so I've never bought a comic since.

/If I want to keep up with the X-Men, why the hell do I have to buy the Micronauts and ROM, Space Knight.  What the crap is that?
 
2013-08-17 12:48:21 PM  
Thats if, and its a big if, you could hold his attention more than a millisecond on something trivial, like family, or his wife.
 
2013-08-17 01:20:09 PM  
One of the first slides claims that Robin, Hawkeye and Mockingbird can fly. Book has zero credibility.
 
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