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(SanDiegoUnionTribune)   Take the Bob Filner Memorial Sexual Harassment quiz -- how not to be a cad   (utsandiego.com) divider line 61
    More: Cool, Filner, Filner Memorial, sexual harassment, San Diego Unified School District, Port of San Diego  
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4188 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Aug 2013 at 2:19 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-16 09:43:58 AM

ikanreed: Or you know, you could take the quiz and find that asking a co-worker on a date is perfectly legal(as long as you aren't their manager). It's doing it over and over after they've made their feelings clear that is illegal.


So you're saying that perhaps sitting on her her desk with my junk hanging out and flowers tied to it may be a little over the top?
 
2013-08-16 10:37:19 AM
Got as far as #2
Shoot Michael
 
2013-08-16 11:07:21 AM
Which type of sexual harassment is this? Jason is removed from a key account because he declined the client's sexual advances. Answer: Quid pro quo  Your answer, "Hostile work environment", was incorrect

HAH no! that is the exact opposite of what Quid pro quo means, and that is a perfect definition of a hostile work environment.


Eric has been written up on disciplinary action several times, and the company is preparing to fire him for poor performance. Before that happens, Eric makes a harassment claim against a co-worker. Should you proceed with firing Eric?Answer: No, this could be interpreted as retaliation against an alleged victim.

not if you have a record of poor performance that is documented with date and times and he submitted his complaint after he was given his notice which is also dated, you can still fire him. You will have to investigate his claims with careful documentation, but his ass is still out the door.
 
2013-08-16 11:58:01 AM
Choosing the PC answers is fairly straightforward.  But following much of this to the letter succeeds in creating a hostile, adversarial workplace as much as it succeeds in curbing sexual harassment.

Also, LPT: HR is not your friend.  Their job is to protect the company and its interests, not necessarily the individual employees.  Also, anything you say to HR will be recorded, and you can bet your a** it can and will be used against you in future performance reviews.  Having problems with life/work balance?  Problems with your family making it hard for you to focus at work?  Go talk to a friend, don't talk to HR.
 
2013-08-16 12:04:13 PM
HotWingAgenda:

The Union Trib in San Diego is infamous for yellow journalism. Don't treat anything they report as factually accurate.

Came to see this, leaving satisfied.
 
2013-08-16 12:39:42 PM
It didn't mention anything about, Chloroforming a coworker and locking her in your trunk.
So I'm go then right?
 
2013-08-16 02:16:02 PM

ILoveBurritos: Except the owner of the paper isn't even shy about using the paper as his tool.
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/11/business/media/san-diego-union-tri bu ne-open-about-its-pro-business-motives.html?_r=0


The NYT doesn't like them. Wow. Talk about a political agenda.

/wake me when the U-T hires Jayson Blair
 
2013-08-16 03:31:14 PM

Cagey B: pedobearapproved: downstairs: I stopped after answering #1.  Don't get involved in others lives.  Do your job.  Complain if others aren't doing theirs, fine.  But beyond that... NOYB.

If you weren't the lowest of low level employees you'd know that's not the case. The first time you hear an employee complain of harassment you'll wish you'd known that your shift manager likes to get touchy with his female co-workers.

To be fair, it's possible this dude is self-employed. But yeah, if you're supervising, you'd better be on this shiat.


I am, and I read it wrong.  I read it from the standpoint of a fellow employee at the same level.  My bad.

Yeah, a supervisor should be all over that crap.
 
2013-08-16 04:25:59 PM

farker99: HotWingAgenda:

The Union Trib in San Diego is infamous for yellow journalism. Don't treat anything they report as factually accurate.

Came to see this, leaving satisfied.


*eye roll*

The local newspaper in a large conservative military town has conservative editors! Alert the papers in every small town in the US mid-section.
 
2013-08-16 04:34:35 PM
2. Michael and Soha travel on business together. Michael always asks Soha to share his room, but Soha always says no and Michael politely changes the subject. What should you do?
Answer: Put a stop to Michael's behavior. Soha has asked Michael to stop.
* 92% answered correctly
✗Your answer, "Michael has been a valuable employee, and Soha is a very confident person who speaks her mind. Trust them to work it out.", was incorrect.


 Soha says no and Michael doesn't push it.  Soha hasn't made a complaint, and she also hasn't "asked him to stop," she's only rebuffed his advances.  Hope springs eternal, so he's being persistent but not overly aggressive.  How am I supposed to know she's offended?  But I got it wrong, so I guess it's not the employee's decision as to whether or not they're offended; if I see anything that could be remotely construed as harassment, I need to step in and put a stop to it.


8. Marcy's boss, Bill, often approaches her workstation and tells sexual jokes. Marcy does not consider Bill's conduct offensive, but other "reasonable" women certainly would find the conduct offensive. Can Marcy state a claim for sexual harassment?
Answer: No
* 10% answered correctly
✗Your answer, "Yes", was incorrect.


Except this time, apparently!


10. Makayla is sleeping with her subordinate Jeremy. Jeremy takes advantage, coming in late and goofing off. At promotion time, Makayla's conscience won't let her promote Jeremy. She gives the job to Jim. Should Makayla worry about a lawsuit?Answer: Yes, Jeremy has good grounds for a sexual harassment lawsuit.Jeremy could claim the situation amounted to quid pro quo (this for that) harassment.
* 61% answered correctly
✗Your answer, "No, Makayla didn't let the relationship affect her decision.", was incorrect.


Since he didn't get the promotion, what was the quid pro quo?  "Sleep with me and you can come in late and goof off"?  If a different manager looked at Jeremy's performance and agreed with Makayla's decision, it shouldn't matter whether or not they were sleeping together.  I accept that I got the answer wrong though, since in the U.S., everyone should be worrying all the time about a lawsuit for something or other.

P.S. U~T, How would you explain what quid pro quo means?
Jeremy could claim the situation amounted to quid pro quo (this for that) harassment.
quid pro quo (this for that)
(this for that)


17.  Eric has been written up on disciplinary action several times, and the company is preparing to fire him for poor performance. Before that happens, Eric makes a harassment claim against a co-worker. Should you proceed with firing Eric?Answer: No, this could be interpreted as retaliation against an alleged victim.
* 26% answered correctly
✗Your answer, "Yes, there is a well-documented paper trail as to Eric's poor performance.", was incorrect.


Unless he's using the harassment as a defense for his poor performance and discipline problems (which, if he did, would immediately smell like bullshiat anyway), I don't see why he can't be fired on schedule as long as you continue to investigate his claim in good faith.


23. Federal law specifically prohibits discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.Answer: FalseHarassment can occur regardless of the sexual orientation or gender of the employees. Federal law does not specifically prohibit discrimination by private employers on the basis of sexual orientation.
* 8% answered correctly
✗Your answer, "True", was incorrect.


Wow, federal law.  I and 92% of registered test-takers frown on your shenanigans.


25. You are the boss, and an employee approaches you with a problem. After you explain you can't guarantee absolute confidentiality, the employee refuses to tell you what is bothering her. What should you do then?Answer: Tell HR about the situation.Human resources experts may have some experience, insight or tactics that could help the situation.
* 93% answered correctly
✗Your answer, "Take a wait-and-see approach.", was incorrect.


What situation?!?  She won't say anything, so what am I supposed to say?  "Hey HR, a female employee has a problem.  Good luck.  Also, I'm quitting tomorrow.  I don't want to be the boss of this silly place any longer."
 
2013-08-16 06:35:01 PM
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