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(WWL)   Thief to jewelry store clerk: "Do you mind if I put these two Rolexes valued at $75,000 on at the same time to compare them?" Clerk: "Why no, not at all, my good fellow." Thief: Bye-yee   (wwl.com) divider line 80
    More: Amusing, NOPD, Rolex, jewelry stores  
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4970 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Aug 2013 at 8:10 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-14 07:17:16 AM  
It's kind of surprising that someone selling watches of that value would make such a comical mistake.
 
2013-08-14 08:11:56 AM  
Can't close the sale if you don't let the customer test the wares, right Oprah?
 
2013-08-14 08:16:50 AM  
At least the clerk will be able to tell time on his job hunt. He'll probably just get the $34,250.00 watch since his buddy will keep the more expensive one.
 
2013-08-14 08:17:25 AM  
I wonder what it's like to have so much money you can piss it away in shiat like a Rolex.
 
GBB
2013-08-14 08:18:33 AM  
Did they play the Black Card??
 
2013-08-14 08:20:06 AM  
I'm not sure I could do that without saying "Yoink!"
 
2013-08-14 08:22:30 AM  
FTFA: "Anyone with information on the suspect and/or the crime is asked to call Crimestoppers at 504-822-111"

I'll send them a link to the article for information on the crime, and attach the photo for information on the suspect. All they need to do is find his name. Together we will get him, guys!!
 
2013-08-14 08:25:53 AM  
mishalov.com
Oooooooo-praaaaaaaaaAAAAAAAHHHHH!
 
2013-08-14 08:26:01 AM  
Used to be in jewelry trade. Just about every person I ever sold a fine watch to put two or more on their wrist to compare them side-by-side - it's normal and customary.
Poor subby - he wanted to feel so superior to that jeweler - but actually, he himself is the dumbass!
Quite droll, in my view.
 
2013-08-14 08:36:35 AM  
what i'd like to know, is really, who's dumb enough to pay that kind of money for a farking watch ?
 
2013-08-14 08:36:38 AM  
I'm wondering why the hell the guard that was sitting at the door didn't clothesline the dude with his nightstick.

You sell genuine Rolex watches, so you must have a guard sitting by the door, right?

Right?!?!
 
2013-08-14 08:45:24 AM  
Sometimes it's the simplest crimes that are the most effective.
 
2013-08-14 08:47:35 AM  

Lemmy Kilmister: what i'd like to know, is really, who's dumb enough to pay that kind of money for a farking watch ?


I would like know what's so special about the watches to justify the cost.  Can I launch ICBMs with them or at least remote control my TV?
 
2013-08-14 08:48:48 AM  

PainInTheASP: I'm wondering why the hell the guard that was sitting at the door didn't clothesline the dude with his nightstick.

You sell genuine Rolex watches, so you must have a guard sitting by the door, right?

Right?!?!


Or at least a door that only opens with a push of a button by the sales staff.  Better yet a set of doors that you can trap the guy in the middle so he doesn't turn around & start trying to get at the button himself (bullet resistant lexan windows as well I'd assume).  I've seen videos on YT with a thief caught in one of those. It was quite amusing listening to him beg & plead with the store to let him go before the cops got there.  "Sure, you tried to run off with $75k worth of inventory ($10k cost...), we'll be right there to let you out as soon as we're done reorganizing the extensive fingernail clipping collection that we have..."
 
2013-08-14 08:54:54 AM  

PainInTheASP: I'm wondering why the hell the guard that was sitting at the door didn't clothesline the dude with his nightstick.

You sell genuine Rolex watches, so you must have a guard sitting by the door, right?

Right?!?!


I will explain this to you the best I can, based on my 25 some-odd years in that business.
The jeweler - especially the high-line jeweler - faces a dilemma. His goods are extremely valuable, and if he were a bank, he would keep them locked away in a deep vault.
But he isn't a bank. He actually has to SELL the stuff - useless stuff that costs vast quantities of money. And NOBODY is going to pay for it if the don't love it, because they don't need it.
You can't sell fine jewelry from behind bullet-proof glass. People want to handle it, fondle it, smear their funky DNA all over it before they'll love it. And every little once in a while, one of those people turns out to be a thief, and evades security. The snatch and grab and the smash and grab are a reality, and you can't sell high line jewelry to classy customers in a hostile, security oriented setting that could prevent them with certainty.
(Note - there are shiatty pawn shops and so on that have security doors and so on - they are not high line jewelry stores)
So - it's a cost of doing business - one of the many things you pay for when you buy fine jewelry.
I understand that a lot of Farkers are amazed at the lax security, and suppose themselves clever and wise for pointing it out - they are just uninformed - but that's OK., because I just educated them.
 
2013-08-14 08:55:23 AM  
In Philadephia, they're worth fifty bucks.
 
2013-08-14 08:57:05 AM  
He'll look more successful now.
 
2013-08-14 08:58:35 AM  
Would it really be out of line for a store located on the edge of the French Quarter and right across the street from a casino to check a photo id and method of payment before handing over 70k dollars in merchandise?   Or, are people who really can afford $40,000 watches so sensitive that they would be offended or made to feel less special?
 
2013-08-14 08:59:26 AM  
He should have asked to put a watch on each wrist and ankle because he's OCD about Symmetry or some crap.
 
2013-08-14 08:59:41 AM  
Rolex is still a thing?
 
2013-08-14 09:00:22 AM  
cdn02.cdn.justjared.com PROUD!
 
2013-08-14 09:03:23 AM  

jso2897: PainInTheASP: I'm wondering why the hell the guard that was sitting at the door didn't clothesline the dude with his nightstick.

You sell genuine Rolex watches, so you must have a guard sitting by the door, right?

Right?!?!

I will explain this to you the best I can, based on my 25 some-odd years in that business.
The jeweler - especially the high-line jeweler - faces a dilemma. His goods are extremely valuable, and if he were a bank, he would keep them locked away in a deep vault.
But he isn't a bank. He actually has to SELL the stuff - useless stuff that costs vast quantities of money. And NOBODY is going to pay for it if the don't love it, because they don't need it.
You can't sell fine jewelry from behind bullet-proof glass. People want to handle it, fondle it, smear their funky DNA all over it before they'll love it. And every little once in a while, one of those people turns out to be a thief, and evades security. The snatch and grab and the smash and grab are a reality, and you can't sell high line jewelry to classy customers in a hostile, security oriented setting that could prevent them with certainty.
(Note - there are shiatty pawn shops and so on that have security doors and so on - they are not high line jewelry stores)
So - it's a cost of doing business - one of the many things you pay for when you buy fine jewelry.
I understand that a lot of Farkers are amazed at the lax security, and suppose themselves clever and wise for pointing it out - they are just uninformed - but that's OK., because I just educated them.


This is quite a comment. Pity so few saw it.
 
2013-08-14 09:09:07 AM  
Jordy laforge has fallen on hard times...
 
2013-08-14 09:19:38 AM  

Ordinary Genius: I wonder what it's like to have so much money you can piss it away in shiat like a Rolex.


I wonder what it's like to be so worthless and bitter.
 
2013-08-14 09:19:59 AM  

cygnusx13: jso2897: PainInTheASP: I'm wondering why the hell the guard that was sitting at the door didn't clothesline the dude with his nightstick.

You sell genuine Rolex watches, so you must have a guard sitting by the door, right?

Right?!?!

I will explain this to you the best I can, based on my 25 some-odd years in that business.
The jeweler - especially the high-line jeweler - faces a dilemma. His goods are extremely valuable, and if he were a bank, he would keep them locked away in a deep vault.
But he isn't a bank. He actually has to SELL the stuff - useless stuff that costs vast quantities of money. And NOBODY is going to pay for it if the don't love it, because they don't need it.
You can't sell fine jewelry from behind bullet-proof glass. People want to handle it, fondle it, smear their funky DNA all over it before they'll love it. And every little once in a while, one of those people turns out to be a thief, and evades security. The snatch and grab and the smash and grab are a reality, and you can't sell high line jewelry to classy customers in a hostile, security oriented setting that could prevent them with certainty.
(Note - there are shiatty pawn shops and so on that have security doors and so on - they are not high line jewelry stores)
So - it's a cost of doing business - one of the many things you pay for when you buy fine jewelry.
I understand that a lot of Farkers are amazed at the lax security, and suppose themselves clever and wise for pointing it out - they are just uninformed - but that's OK., because I just educated them.

This is quite a comment. Pity so few saw it.


I was just kidding - I realize that the concepts I'm discussing are beyond the reach of many here.
 typical retail jeweler at the classy end of the trade earns a comfortable middle clkass living, if he is successful - maybe better. But he actually owns an inventory that is worth many times what he will earn off it in his lifetime, and cannot really be insured for anything like it's full value as a practical matter. He can't do any cowboy shiat. All the childish fantasies about trapping criminals in your store, or shooting them with a gun or whatever - those are just Darwin's little IQ test to any serious, high-class jeweler. In the serious, classy end of the trade, you don't go cowboy, because you are a huge deep pocket with a target on your back - and if you lose it, you won't be able to make it back again - it's too much money. Letting a thief run out with a necklace will cost you a few thousand dollars. Stopping him could cost you your whole business in one stupid moment. And jewelers live with this reality day and night.
They all treat theft as what it is - a cost of doing busines, and not something to be eliminated at any and all costs.
 
2013-08-14 09:24:19 AM  

jso2897: PainInTheASP: I'm wondering why the hell the guard that was sitting at the door didn't clothesline the dude with his nightstick.

You sell genuine Rolex watches, so you must have a guard sitting by the door, right?

Right?!?!

I will explain this to you the best I can, based on my 25 some-odd years in that business.
The jeweler - especially the high-line jeweler - faces a dilemma. His goods are extremely valuable, and if he were a bank, he would keep them locked away in a deep vault.
But he isn't a bank. He actually has to SELL the stuff - useless stuff that costs vast quantities of money. And NOBODY is going to pay for it if the don't love it, because they don't need it.
You can't sell fine jewelry from behind bullet-proof glass. People want to handle it, fondle it, smear their funky DNA all over it before they'll love it. And every little once in a while, one of those people turns out to be a thief, and evades security. The snatch and grab and the smash and grab are a reality, and you can't sell high line jewelry to classy customers in a hostile, security oriented setting that could prevent them with certainty.
(Note - there are shiatty pawn shops and so on that have security doors and so on - they are not high line jewelry stores)
So - it's a cost of doing business - one of the many things you pay for when you buy fine jewelry.
I understand that a lot of Farkers are amazed at the lax security, and suppose themselves clever and wise for pointing it out - they are just uninformed - but that's OK., because I just educated them.


Who the hell is talking about bullet-proof glass?  They just lost two Rolex watches worth a combined SEVENTY-FIVE GRAND. I bet the CTO on those two items is more than enough to cover a part-time goon who dresses nice.  And I bet that after this there WILL be a goon at the door of that place.
 
2013-08-14 09:29:10 AM  

PainInTheASP: jso2897: PainInTheASP: I'm wondering why the hell the guard that was sitting at the door didn't clothesline the dude with his nightstick.

You sell genuine Rolex watches, so you must have a guard sitting by the door, right?

Right?!?!

I will explain this to you the best I can, based on my 25 some-odd years in that business.
The jeweler - especially the high-line jeweler - faces a dilemma. His goods are extremely valuable, and if he were a bank, he would keep them locked away in a deep vault.
But he isn't a bank. He actually has to SELL the stuff - useless stuff that costs vast quantities of money. And NOBODY is going to pay for it if the don't love it, because they don't need it.
You can't sell fine jewelry from behind bullet-proof glass. People want to handle it, fondle it, smear their funky DNA all over it before they'll love it. And every little once in a while, one of those people turns out to be a thief, and evades security. The snatch and grab and the smash and grab are a reality, and you can't sell high line jewelry to classy customers in a hostile, security oriented setting that could prevent them with certainty.
(Note - there are shiatty pawn shops and so on that have security doors and so on - they are not high line jewelry stores)
So - it's a cost of doing business - one of the many things you pay for when you buy fine jewelry.
I understand that a lot of Farkers are amazed at the lax security, and suppose themselves clever and wise for pointing it out - they are just uninformed - but that's OK., because I just educated them.

Who the hell is talking about bullet-proof glass?  They just lost two Rolex watches worth a combined SEVENTY-FIVE GRAND. I bet the CTO on those two items is more than enough to cover a part-time goon who dresses nice.  And I bet that after this there WILL be a goon at the door of that place.


There might have been - there isn't much detail in the story - but I 've seen and heard of door goons being successfully evaded - and often, they are not allowed to use any force to detain anyone. As a store owner (when I was one) I would NEVER allow it.
 
2013-08-14 09:34:05 AM  

jso2897: There might have been - there isn't much detail in the story - but I 've seen and heard of door goons being successfully evaded - and often, they are not allowed to use any force to detain anyone. As a store owner (when I was one) I would NEVER allow it.


Have you ever seen loss prevention in action?  I've seen people get tackled over a carton of cigarettes.
 
2013-08-14 09:34:28 AM  

DrBrownCow: Would it really be out of line for a store located on the edge of the French Quarter and right across the street from a casino to check a photo id and method of payment before handing over 70k dollars in merchandise?   Or, are people who really can afford $40,000 watches so sensitive that they would be offended or made to feel less special?


I'm surprised that a jewelry store on Canal St wouldn't have a panic button that auto locks the door.  Oh well, their insurance will take care of the loss.
 
2013-08-14 09:45:47 AM  

PainInTheASP: I'm wondering why the hell the guard that was sitting at the door didn't clothesline the dude with his nightstick.

You sell genuine Rolex watches, so you must have a guard sitting by the door, right?

Right?!?!


Far less often than you would think. A guard costs a ton of money and when it comes down to it there is not a lot they can legally do. The jewelry store I worked in through College sold Rolexes (and other high end watches) and didn't even have a door - just a wide hallway that went straight onto the street.

Also - as jso2897 has said - if you want to sell a watch costing thousands of dollars you have to be nice to the person buying it. When they're trying this stuff on they want to feel like royalty, not like a criminal under guard.

One thing about Rolex - they keep records of all case numbers. If your Rolex is ever stolen you also report it to Rolex and they flag that watch in their records. If/when the new owner sends it in for a service or repair Rolex will check the case number against their records and give you a call. It makes them slightly less attractive to steal as you need to sell them to someone who doesn't know it's stolen (i.e. does not do due diligence before giving a lot of money to a stranger) or who knows a very good watch repair guy.
 
2013-08-14 09:50:58 AM  
wait, you can buy REAL rolexes on canal st?
 
2013-08-14 09:51:10 AM  
I am calling BS on a submariner costing 34000K...

And a used 16 year old platinum rolex being 42K?  uhhh.

I smell slow sales and insurance claim.
 
2013-08-14 09:53:53 AM  

PainInTheASP: jso2897: There might have been - there isn't much detail in the story - but I 've seen and heard of door goons being successfully evaded - and often, they are not allowed to use any force to detain anyone. As a store owner (when I was one) I would NEVER allow it.

Have you ever seen loss prevention in action?  I've seen people get tackled over a carton of cigarettes.


Not in uptown, high-line jewelry stores. They don't do "loss prevention" (to the public - they are fierce on their employees) because it turns off rich, hig-class people, and they go away nad don't buy your stuff. Part of what the bored trophy wife who would come into our store and buy a $40,000 tennis bracelet to assuage her boredom was paying for was a retail experince - one involving lot's af ass-kissing and elegant bullshiat. She won't enter my store through a security door like a nasty pawnshop has, nor shop under the imposing glare of some reant-a-cop- she'll walk next door to my competitor, whose store looks like a boutique when you walk into it.
And you really think that ayt serious, adult businessman in that kind of business is actually going to try to forcibly stop a fleeing thief? Why in the name of God would I even want to do that? If you Flotsy Dirtbaggian, and you are selling cell phones or some shiat in some hole - fine - lay hands on a member of the public. But I (the hypothetical high line jeweler) am sitting on millions of dollars in capital, and I cannot get litigation insurance at an affordable price. I will let a scumbag run with a $10,000 necklace before I'll risk a 10 million dollar lawsuit.
Every real jeweler in the world has had a few snatch and grabs, and usually a smash and grab. They are a cost of doing business, cheaper to allow than to prevent.
Of course, that is not the whole jewelry trade, and you could go out and find examples of places where the flower of the ghetto, barrio, and trailer park buy their jewelry that are like Fort Knox. But that's not a sector of the trade I know much about. Consumer quality jewelry is a tough, viciously competitive trade that I, frankly, don't have the stones or the intestinal fortitude for. I like to sell things to self-deluded rich parasites - it safer and more profitable.
 
2013-08-14 09:54:04 AM  

BHShaman: Can't close the sale if you don't let the customer test the wares, right Oprah?



The thief probably was wearing a large diamond stud and Louboutin shoes. They saw how much Farkers were willing to give a guy just because he looks rich.
 
2013-08-14 09:55:24 AM  
Where is this guy when Oprah needs him?
 
2013-08-14 09:56:17 AM  

Lucidz: I am calling BS on a submariner costing 34000K...

And a used 16 year old platinum rolex being 42K?  uhhh.

I smell slow sales and insurance claim.


if new, the all-gold sub would retail for that (gold subs plummet in value when used, unlike stainless subs, which retain their value much better). the used plat DD would likely not retail for $42k, as a brand-new can be bought for $55k or so.

/watch nerd
 
2013-08-14 09:56:28 AM  

The Evil That Lies In The Hearts Of Men: A guard costs a ton of money and when it comes down to it there is not a lot they can legally do.


No they don't.  There are established reputable firms that will offer their services to any business that wants it, and for a heck of a lot cheaper than you think.  Grocery stores use them all the time, which leads me to my previous statement about what they "can" and "cannot" do.

Also, whey the hell would upscale clientele feel threatened by security?  If anything, the ex-linebacker sitting at the door should make them feel safer.
 
2013-08-14 10:00:50 AM  

PainInTheASP: The Evil That Lies In The Hearts Of Men: A guard costs a ton of money and when it comes down to it there is not a lot they can legally do.

No they don't.  There are established reputable firms that will offer their services to any business that wants it, and for a heck of a lot cheaper than you think.  Grocery stores use them all the time, which leads me to my previous statement about what they "can" and "cannot" do.

Also, whey the hell would upscale clientele feel threatened by security?  If anything, the ex-linebacker sitting at the door should make them feel safer.


Look - I've tried. But you are arguing about a business you are utterly ignorant of, with a person who spent twenty-five years in it, and you are telling him he's full of shiat because what he is saying doesn't jibe with your innapplicable experiences of unrelated things. I am beginning to believe that any more time spent on you would be wasted - there is no cure for WILLFUL ignorance.
 
2013-08-14 10:00:55 AM  

Lucidz: I am calling BS on a submariner costing 34000K...

And a used 16 year old platinum rolex being 42K?  uhhh.

I smell slow sales and insurance claim.


Those numbers sound accurate

They make 18K gold watches, which according to a quick Google search retail at about $35k.

The gold and platinum versions of their watches also come with various levels of diamond encrustment, which can jack up the price further.
 
2013-08-14 10:03:08 AM  

jso2897: Not in uptown, high-line jewelry stores. They don't do "loss prevention" (to the public - they are fierce on their employees) because it turns off rich, hig-class people, and they go away nad don't buy your stuff.


Why?  Why would they feel threatened? It's an additional safety measure that they directly benefit from in the event of a robbery.  If I'm looking at expensive watches, it means that I can probably afford them.  If I can afford them, I probably have other items on my person that are worth a lot of money as well.

If this is the case, I'd much rather go to a store with heightened security.
 
2013-08-14 10:11:59 AM  

jso2897: PainInTheASP: The Evil That Lies In The Hearts Of Men: A guard costs a ton of money and when it comes down to it there is not a lot they can legally do.

No they don't.  There are established reputable firms that will offer their services to any business that wants it, and for a heck of a lot cheaper than you think.  Grocery stores use them all the time, which leads me to my previous statement about what they "can" and "cannot" do.

Also, whey the hell would upscale clientele feel threatened by security?  If anything, the ex-linebacker sitting at the door should make them feel safer.

Look - I've tried. But you are arguing about a business you are utterly ignorant of, with a person who spent twenty-five years in it, and you are telling him he's full of shiat because what he is saying doesn't jibe with your innapplicable experiences of unrelated things. I am beginning to believe that any more time spent on you would be wasted - there is no cure for WILLFUL ignorance.


You know what?  You're right. I know nothing about how you run your business.  Nor do I have any desire to do so.  As far as I'm concerned, I'll be better off if I stay as far away from it as possible.

Cheers.
 
2013-08-14 10:14:03 AM  

PainInTheASP: jso2897: Not in uptown, high-line jewelry stores. They don't do "loss prevention" (to the public - they are fierce on their employees) because it turns off rich, hig-class people, and they go away nad don't buy your stuff.

Why?  Why would they feel threatened? It's an additional safety measure that they directly benefit from in the event of a robbery.  If I'm looking at expensive watches, it means that I can probably afford them.  If I can afford them, I probably have other items on my person that are worth a lot of money as well.

If this is the case, I'd much rather go to a store with heightened security.


Well, I'm only talking about high-line, high-class jewelry stores - places you don't shop anyway, so that's irrelevant.
Anyway, I've answered all your questions, and now you are repeating them - so we're done.
Have a nice day!
 
2013-08-14 10:20:02 AM  

Recoil Therapy: Or at least a door that only opens with a push of a button by the sales staff. Better yet a set of doors that you can trap the guy in the middle so he doesn't turn around & start trying to get at the button himself (bullet resistant lexan windows as well I'd assume). I've seen videos on YT with a thief caught in one of those. It was quite amusing listening to him beg & plead with the store to let him go before the cops got there. "Sure, you tried to run off with $75k worth of inventory ($10k cost...), we'll be right there to let you out as soon as we're done reorganizing the extensive fingernail clipping collection that we have.


I'm thinking an RFID tag that locks the door if the tag isn't deactivated might work.
 
2013-08-14 10:21:21 AM  

FlashHarry: wait, you can buy REAL rolexes on canal st?


Not only that, but they're like half the price of a retail store. I got mine for less than 2500 bucks

img.fark.net
 
2013-08-14 10:22:02 AM  
This is precisely why many stores around here actually have locks on the door.  The person at the register has to buzz you IN and OUT of the store.  This even goes for coin shops.  Something as elelmental as that would have prevented this robbery 100%
 
2013-08-14 10:22:06 AM  

PainInTheASP: No they don't.  There are established reputable firms that will offer their services to any business that wants it, and for a heck of a lot cheaper than you think.  Grocery stores use them all the time, which leads me to my previous statement about what they "can" and "cannot" do.


The business models there are completely different, as are the theft risks.

Grocery stores (or at least the ones that hire security) are large operations with dozens of staff members in a huge store where all the wares are available to be handled by the customers at all times. Customers are regularly in places where no staff members can see them and so can put products in their pockets and walk out the door. There is a constant and regular drain due to shoplifting that can be discouraged by a visible security presence who represents, maybe, 5% of the staffing budget. Further - the vast majority of successful shoplifters are not detected so their identities are not known for police reports.

Jewelry stores are generally small operations with a half dozen staff or less - adding a security guard could increase staff costs by 20% or more. Instead the stores are small and open so all staff can see all parts of the store at all times. The wares are behind glass. At no time will a customer handle wares without the direct supervision of a staff member. Shoplifting is a minimal drain. Theft from people who switch wares with replicas or who grab and run is generally rare - there is a lot of risk, the goods can be hard to shift and everyone will be fully aware of the theft at the time it happens so can give the police a good description and show them directly to the security footage so they have a nice picture of the thief. The place I worked at had one such incident in 3 years - the cost of a full time guard for three years would have dwarfed the retail cost of the stolen goods, let alone the wholesale cost.
 
2013-08-14 10:28:41 AM  
jso2897:
Have a nice day!

So... just wondering. What if you had super hawt scantily clad security people at the doors that fawn over the customers? I know they still cant do much really but they might be a deterrent and a sales tool!
 
2013-08-14 10:30:59 AM  
was the thief black? did he play the race card to get the watches?

Sho nuff Oprah woulda been booting it out the door with a purse under her arm in a similar circumstance.
 
2013-08-14 10:33:31 AM  

The Evil That Lies In The Hearts Of Men: PainInTheASP: No they don't.  There are established reputable firms that will offer their services to any business that wants it, and for a heck of a lot cheaper than you think.  Grocery stores use them all the time, which leads me to my previous statement about what they "can" and "cannot" do.

The business models there are completely different, as are the theft risks.

Grocery stores (or at least the ones that hire security) are large operations with dozens of staff members in a huge store where all the wares are available to be handled by the customers at all times. Customers are regularly in places where no staff members can see them and so can put products in their pockets and walk out the door. There is a constant and regular drain due to shoplifting that can be discouraged by a visible security presence who represents, maybe, 5% of the staffing budget. Further - the vast majority of successful shoplifters are not detected so their identities are not known for police reports.

Jewelry stores are generally small operations with a half dozen staff or less - adding a security guard could increase staff costs by 20% or more. Instead the stores are small and open so all staff can see all parts of the store at all times. The wares are behind glass. At no time will a customer handle wares without the direct supervision of a staff member. Shoplifting is a minimal drain. Theft from people who switch wares with replicas or who grab and run is generally rare - there is a lot of risk, the goods can be hard to shift and everyone will be fully aware of the theft at the time it happens so can give the police a good description and show them directly to the security footage so they have a nice picture of the thief. The place I worked at had one such incident in 3 years - the cost of a full time guard for three years would have dwarfed the retail cost of the stolen goods, let alone the wholesale cost.


The guy has something wrong in his brain - who the hell throws a personal hissy-fit just because somebody shows them "wrong on the internet"?
I'm sick of these folks who can't have a civil conversation with a person who is more knowledgable than them, because the fact of the person being more knowledgable hurts their butt so bad.
Everything you explained to him has already been explained to him by three different people. He isn't going to "get it" this time around.
I am always encountering people here on Fark who know more than me about the stuff we talk about - and I am grateful for, and appreciative of their expertise - ESPECIALLY when they straighten me out from thinking something erroneous. What kind of person reacts with rage when someone takes the time and trouble to educate them about something they are ignorant of?
I blame Ayn Rand - she encouraged this kind of "autistic Aristotleanism", where people think the incomplete reasonings they do in their head trumps actual, tested reality.
 
2013-08-14 10:34:12 AM  

FlashHarry: wait, you can buy REAL rolexes on canal st?


Jack Sutton Jewelry is in Canal Place, a shopping mall/office building down at the base of Canal by the River. It's full of high-end shopping, e.g. Saks Fifth Avenue, Brooks Brothers, etc. His jewelry is kind of gauche and overpriced, IMO, but I think he does a lot of business with Saints and Pelicans players and their wives.

Since you're a watch nerd, you may appreciate this - A law school buddy of mine had parents who had a bit of money. And by "a bit" I mean back in the seventies, his dad loaned a buddy $10k for a one-fifth share in some lingerie store called Victoria's Secret. Anyhoo, his parents collected time-pieces, clocks, watches, and one of the watches his dad got was at a charity auction and it was a $75k Rolex custom designed for Deion Sanders when he signed with the Cowboys. It had a diamond bezel and a blue star on the face made of sapphire stones. It was gloriously over the top.
 
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