If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(ABC)   "Nurse Suspected of Killing Up to 46 Kids to Get Out of Prison". Boy, what do you have to do to get INTO prison?   (abcnews.go.com) divider line 57
    More: Sick, Nurse Suspected, Bexar County, Texas Department of Criminal Justice, lethal doses, Texas Senate  
•       •       •

10140 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Aug 2013 at 4:43 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



57 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-08-13 04:33:55 PM  
Be in possession of weed usually does it.
 
2013-08-13 04:40:31 PM  

Aarontology: Be in possession of weed usually does it.


Or just be black.
 
2013-08-13 04:45:39 PM  

Nurse Suspected of Killing Up to 46 Kids to Get Out of Prison


I think she was looking for a

*sunglasses*

get-out-of-jail spree card.


YEEEEEEEAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHH!!
 
2013-08-13 04:46:54 PM  
Was she reading a Paul Sheldon novel?
 
2013-08-13 04:47:39 PM  
Well, if it was "up to" 46, that implies it could only have been a dozen or so.  And let's face it, some kids are really obnoxious.
 
2013-08-13 04:47:54 PM  
She is getting out of jail right when there is a huge shortage of nurses so at least it won't be difficult for her to find a job and reintegrate into society.
 
2013-08-13 04:49:47 PM  

RedPhoenix122: Aarontology: Be in possession of weed usually does it.

Or just be black.


The combination of the two will ensure it.
 
2013-08-13 04:53:19 PM  
Some people just don't like kids.
 
2013-08-13 04:53:24 PM  
According to the article, be convicted of killing one kid and attempting to kill another.  She wasn't prosecuted for killing the other 50 or however many but she they will dig one up and send her back.
We aren't Europe, you know.
 
2013-08-13 04:54:41 PM  

Old Man Winter: According to the article, be convicted of killing one kid and attempting to kill another.  She wasn't prosecuted for killing the other 50 or however many but she they will dig one up and send her back.
We aren't Europe, you know.


That is what is probably going to happen.
 
2013-08-13 04:54:59 PM  
upload.wikimedia.org

"Amateur."


In January 2001, Chris Gregg, a senior West Yorkshire detective, was selected to lead an investigation into 22 of the West Yorkshire deaths. Following this, The Shipman Inquiry into Shipman's activities submitted in July 2002 concluded that he had killed at least 215 of his patients between 1975 and 1998, during which time he practised in Todmorden, West Yorkshire (1974-1975), and Hyde, Greater Manchester (1977-1998).

Dame Janet Smith, the judge who submitted the report, admitted that many more suspicious deaths could not be definitively ascribed to him. Most of his victims were elderly women in good health.

Smith concluded the probable number of Shipman's victims between 1971 and 1998 was 250. In total, 459 people died while under his care, but it is uncertain how many of those were Shipman's victims, as he was often the only doctor to certify a death.
 
2013-08-13 04:57:37 PM  
If it weren't for those danged meddlin' toddlers...
 
2013-08-13 04:59:31 PM  
Prison stocks are way overbought.
 
2013-08-13 05:01:08 PM  
And the hospital destroyed their records, probably on advice from their attornies. "We're gonna get sued, burn everything!"
 
2013-08-13 05:03:19 PM  

RedPhoenix122: Aarontology: Be in possession of weed usually does it.

Or just be black.


Wow, that's not racist at all.
 
2013-08-13 05:04:23 PM  
As head of the department, I noticed all these babies bleeding out and going into respiratory or cardiac arrest and then dying under the direct care of Nurse Jones as indicated in the pediatric unit's medical records.  But what could I do?
/Damn Liberal Texas!
 
2013-08-13 05:05:24 PM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: RedPhoenix122: Aarontology: Be in possession of weed usually does it.

Or just be black.

Wow, that's not racist at all.


shut up, you know it's true
 
2013-08-13 05:08:02 PM  
The bright side.  It's Texas.  If she does get released, one of her victims relatives is likely to give her a lead injection.
 
2013-08-13 05:09:09 PM  
As a nurse, I've alway found it ironic that while we are in the profession most trusted by people, we also have the most prolific serial killers by profession.
 
2013-08-13 05:10:26 PM  
Texas conservatives - tough on crime.
Unlike those pansy libs from California.
 
2013-08-13 05:11:45 PM  
Only 46 kids? Unimpressed, Holly.
pointonfilmdotcom.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-08-13 05:14:52 PM  
She's schedualed for release in 2018. We've got 5 years; I think they'll be able find some new evidence by then.
 
2013-08-13 05:17:07 PM  

whither_apophis: And the hospital destroyed their records, probably on advice from their attornies. "We're gonna get sued, burn everything!"


so, hospitals are supposed to keep detailed records of the deceased in perpetuity?

/ actually, I don't know, how long is a hospital supposed to keep medical records?
 
2013-08-13 05:24:21 PM  

smittyrn: As a nurse, I've alway found it ironic that while we are in the profession most trusted by people, we also have the most prolific serial killers by profession.


serial killers/sociopaths/etc. are drawn towards positions that put them in close contact with their victims.  that's why nurses, priests, teachers, and other health care / child care positions are attractive to those who would abuse the position.

/ it probably goes deeper than that, why criminals go to be lawyers, why drug addicts become doctors, why nutcases become psychiatrists.
// obviously, most of these positions are filled with good people, but any one in these professions will tell you that at least some of the members are drawn to the profession for more personal reasons
 
2013-08-13 05:30:48 PM  

TheShavingofOccam123: Smith concluded the probable number of Shipman's victims between 1971 and 1998 was 250. In total, 459 people died while under his care, but it is uncertain how many of those were Shipman's victims, as he was often the only doctor to certify a death.


I remember him.  Responsible for about a point in England's murder rate for decades when it was figured out.

Only reason he was caught is that he got greedy.
 
2013-08-13 05:33:16 PM  

ongbok: Old Man Winter: According to the article, be convicted of killing one kid and attempting to kill another.  She wasn't prosecuted for killing the other 50 or however many but she they will dig one up and send her back.
We aren't Europe, you know.

That is what is probably going to happen.


This is why we need death penalties.  Concurrent or consecutive, either way.
 
2013-08-13 05:34:07 PM  

pute kisses like a man: whither_apophis: And the hospital destroyed their records, probably on advice from their attornies. "We're gonna get sued, burn everything!"

so, hospitals are supposed to keep detailed records of the deceased in perpetuity?

/ actually, I don't know, how long is a hospital supposed to keep medical records?


I think it varies from state to state. Her conviction was in 84. They started noticing high mortality rates in 81 and linked it to her. Didn't see when she was first charged. But considering the legal system it was 82-83. They suspect she is responsible for many others. You would think that the hospital would want to keep records in those cases, just in case.

So ya, they destroyed everything to keep from getting sued.
 
2013-08-13 05:39:37 PM  
You cornpone gun nuts who talk about Justice on these threads know what you have to do.

Unless you're all mouth and no action, of course.


/I assume none of the parents of the victims were rich
 
2013-08-13 05:50:23 PM  
Hmm, 46.  Seems a bit high.  You think we should do some autopsies to look for the chemical that killed that one kid?
NAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

We'll just cut corners and put her in prison for 99 years.  Lets not defend the other victims.
 
2013-08-13 05:56:30 PM  

seniorgato: Hmm, 46.  Seems a bit high.  You think we should do some autopsies to look for the chemical that killed that one kid?
NAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

We'll just cut corners and put her in prison for 99 years.  Lets not defend the other victims.


County Hospital? Patients were probably wrong income and wrong color for anyone in the law to give a shiat enough.
 
2013-08-13 05:56:48 PM  
You're in the wrong line dumbass!
 
2013-08-13 06:05:37 PM  
Is the "Texas" in that story some small town in Florida or something?  It can't possibly be the Texas I'm thinking of.
 
2013-08-13 06:10:56 PM  

meanmutton: Aarontology: Be in possession of weed usually does it.

The vast majority of people caught with weed don't go to prison.


Shh. Let the idiots continue to think that the prisons are just filled with harmless tokers and that the state is going to spend tens-to-hundreds of thousands a year just to keep them locked up.
 
2013-08-13 06:20:03 PM  

seniorgato: We'll just cut corners and put her in prison for 99 years. Lets not defend the other victims.


Despite women living for longer than men on average, you'd expect that 99 years would be enough for her to die naturally.  Heck, she must be over the average just to be eligible for parole.

Let's see, 35 when convicted, would be 134 for release.  Median life expectancy of 81.  Going by the 'average' of half-time for parole eligibility(the Texas statute must of been generous), that would have been 85 before eligible, not 63-64.

The trouble with convicting her with more attacks is that if the judge is going to have her serve them concurrently it's not going to add more time, meanwhile you have to prove a 2nd murder, more than doubling the cost as you know they prosecuted the easiest case, the 2nd would be 'harder' in many ways.
 
2013-08-13 06:25:35 PM  

8Fingers: pute kisses like a man: whither_apophis: And the hospital destroyed their records, probably on advice from their attornies. "We're gonna get sued, burn everything!"

so, hospitals are supposed to keep detailed records of the deceased in perpetuity?

/ actually, I don't know, how long is a hospital supposed to keep medical records?

I think it varies from state to state. Her conviction was in 84. They started noticing high mortality rates in 81 and linked it to her. Didn't see when she was first charged. But considering the legal system it was 82-83. They suspect she is responsible for many others. You would think that the hospital would want to keep records in those cases, just in case.

So ya, they destroyed everything to keep from getting sued.


University Hospital is where uninsured patients go to be treated.  So what TheShavingofOccam123 said is most likely true.  Most of her victims were poor and nonwhite--not to mention even odds on being illegal immigrants--so the chances of anyone caring were slim.Given that I was born in 1979, I guess I should count myself lucky my mom was in the army, 'cause otherwise I would have been born there.  And I was an ugly baby.
 
2013-08-13 06:40:03 PM  
if only she'd concentrated on babies only a few months younger, she could have done many more, and gotten paid to boot
 
2013-08-13 06:41:06 PM  

Grave_Girl: 8Fingers: pute kisses like a man: whither_apophis: And the hospital destroyed their records, probably on advice from their attornies. "We're gonna get sued, burn everything!"

so, hospitals are supposed to keep detailed records of the deceased in perpetuity?

/ actually, I don't know, how long is a hospital supposed to keep medical records?

I think it varies from state to state. Her conviction was in 84. They started noticing high mortality rates in 81 and linked it to her. Didn't see when she was first charged. But considering the legal system it was 82-83. They suspect she is responsible for many others. You would think that the hospital would want to keep records in those cases, just in case.

So ya, they destroyed everything to keep from getting sued.

University Hospital is where uninsured patients go to be treated.  So what TheShavingofOccam123 said is most likely true.  Most of her victims were poor and nonwhite--not to mention even odds on being illegal immigrants--so the chances of anyone caring were slim.Given that I was born in 1979, I guess I should count myself lucky my mom was in the army, 'cause otherwise I would have been born there.  And I was an ugly baby.


Gotcha, in others words. They just didn't care because of poor people problems.
Sucks!
 
2013-08-13 06:44:11 PM  

meanmutton: The vast majority of people caught with weed don't go to prison.


peterthx: Shh. Let the idiots continue to think that the prisons are just filled with harmless tokers and that the state is going to spend tens-to-hundreds of thousands a year just to keep them locked up.


Doesn't mean that 'most' can't be in for 'being caught with weed' though most I see use 'drugs' without restricting it to Marijuana.  All it means is that if 90% of people caught with weed don't go to prison that you need to 'catch' ~10X more people to reach equilibrium with the other offenses.

I'd like a better site, but: Federal: 197,050 prisoners, 94,600 drug offenses, 48%.  State: 1,341,804: 225,242 or 17%.  Seems the federal government is more about the drugs than the states.

Still, while I don't know about 'just filled', but I'd certainly count eliminating 48% of federal prisoners as 'emptying' them.  Heck, kick out roughly half the state drug offense population, 10% of total prisoners, and you'd remove huge loads of stress from the system.

Use the money saved to actually fund drug treatment and reform programs for those remaining in prison.  We really need to go European style - 1/3 the average incarceration duration ($ saved), 1/3rd the recidivism rate($ saved, it's actually rare enough to NOT expect to see any given released prisoner back within 5 years).
 
2013-08-13 06:49:25 PM  
I'm engraving her name into a .45 caliber bullet and will mail that to any of the parents who would like such a thing.
 
2013-08-13 07:10:31 PM  
Here we go, with a perfect Dexter thread, and no one posts him?
 
2013-08-13 07:34:42 PM  

Molavian: Here we go, with a perfect Dexter thread, and no one posts him?


No shiat. Here, let me rectify that:

memecrunch.com
 
2013-08-13 07:54:19 PM  
Firethorn: Doesn't mean that 'most' can't be in for 'being caught with weed' though most I see use 'drugs' without restricting it to Marijuana.  All it means is that if 90% of people caught with weed don't go to prison that you need to 'catch' ~10X more people to reach equilibrium with the other offenses.

I'd like a better site, but: Federal: 197,050 prisoners, 94,600 drug offenses, 48%.  State: 1,341,804: 225,242 or 17%.  Seems the federal government is more about the drugs than the states.


Meth makers, crack dealers, heroin pushers are part of those stats. Reform them?

Also are they there JUST for those drug offenses? Many people have drugs on them while committing rape, robbery, or murder. Let those folks out as well?

/skewed statistics are skewed
 
2013-08-13 08:15:06 PM  

meanmutton: Aarontology: Be in possession of weed usually does it.

The vast majority of people caught with weed don't go to prison.


No one goes to prison simply for having a little weed.
 
2013-08-13 08:27:01 PM  
Would be a real shame of one of those 46 kids actually had parents that gave a damn and heard about her release.

S S S.
 
2013-08-13 09:17:23 PM  

pute kisses like a man: smittyrn: As a nurse, I've alway found it ironic that while we are in the profession most trusted by people, we also have the most prolific serial killers by profession.

serial killers/sociopaths/etc. are drawn towards positions that put them in close contact with their victims.  that's why nurses, priests, teachers, and other health care / child care positions are attractive to those who would abuse the position.

/ it probably goes deeper than that, why criminals go to be lawyers, why drug addicts become doctors, why nutcases become psychiatrists.
// obviously, most of these positions are filled with good people, but any one in these professions will tell you that at least some of the members are drawn to the profession for more personal reasons


Well that last one make sense. There is a notable case of intelligence and mental disorders and people tend to look up the disease that are affecting them. And then they find it intresting.
/ Has Dysthymia  and is getting a psych degree. Hoping to be a thearpist.
//What the fark is wrong with this woman? She kills the baby while it's still in her mothers arms.
///Normally against the death penalty but kill this woman with the same drug she kill the kid with.
 
2013-08-13 09:20:01 PM  
Have one abortion
 
2013-08-13 09:34:04 PM  
You know who else was a medical professional that liked to kill patients?
 
2013-08-13 10:09:47 PM  
Texas fails at everything, don't they?
 
2013-08-13 10:12:37 PM  
States she is in the infirmary unit in our town. That place is minimum/moderate security--no way any murderers should be there.
/had to do pacemaker clinic there occasionally in the past
//not a spa but not where I want murderers to be...
 
2013-08-13 11:15:22 PM  

Firethorn: meanmutton: The vast majority of people caught with weed don't go to prison.

peterthx: Shh. Let the idiots continue to think that the prisons are just filled with harmless tokers and that the state is going to spend tens-to-hundreds of thousands a year just to keep them locked up.

Doesn't mean that 'most' can't be in for 'being caught with weed' though most I see use 'drugs' without restricting it to Marijuana.  All it means is that if 90% of people caught with weed don't go to prison that you need to 'catch' ~10X more people to reach equilibrium with the other offenses.

I'd like a better site, but: Federal: 197,050 prisoners, 94,600 drug offenses, 48%.  State: 1,341,804: 225,242 or 17%.  Seems the federal government is more about the drugs than the states.

Still, while I don't know about 'just filled', but I'd certainly count eliminating 48% of federal prisoners as 'emptying' them.  Heck, kick out roughly half the state drug offense population, 10% of total prisoners, and you'd remove huge loads of stress from the system.

Use the money saved to actually fund drug treatment and reform programs for those remaining in prison.  We really need to go European style - 1/3 the average incarceration duration ($ saved), 1/3rd the recidivism rate($ saved, it's actually rare enough to NOT expect to see any given released prisoner back within 5 years).


48% doesn't include people who killed other people for drugs or drug money, which they would almost certainly not do if those drugs were cheap.
 
Displayed 50 of 57 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report