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(Nunatsiaq Online)   Chinese cargo ship attempts historic first commercial voyage through North East Passage since the discovery of the floating log as a means of transportation   (nunatsiaqonline.ca ) divider line 24
    More: Obvious, Northeast Passage, means of transportation, Chinese, China-Europe, discovery, Bering Strait, scenic routes, Western Europe  
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2259 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Aug 2013 at 12:38 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-13 12:40:36 PM  
Yay, now we can run even more container ships, burning even more low-grade kerosene.  That won't make things worse at all!
 
2013-08-13 12:45:24 PM  
Floating logs are the easy part. It's hopping across that dam road that's dangerous.
 
2013-08-13 12:46:54 PM  

ikanreed: Yay, now we can run even more container ships, burning even more low-grade kerosene.  That won't make things worse at all!


FTA: The trip is about 12 to 15 days shorter than the current route,

It saves a metric assload of fuel, go panic about something else.
 
2013-08-13 12:49:03 PM  
First trip by a Chinese boat.  The Russians have been doing it for decades - they had a number of nuclear-powered icebreakers during the cold war, and still have at least one running today.
 
2013-08-13 12:55:08 PM  
>The trip is about 12 to 15 days shorter than the current route, which is much longer

How much longer, do you think? In days?
 
2013-08-13 01:00:35 PM  
Speaking of floating logs - *trots off to the bafwoom for a south flush passage*
 
2013-08-13 01:09:26 PM  
Bucharest desires a trade route!
 
2013-08-13 01:11:25 PM  
upload.wikimedia.org

Laughs at stupidmitter.
 
2013-08-13 01:20:05 PM  

ikanreed: Yay, now we can run even more container ships, burning even more low-grade kerosene.  That won't make things worse at all!


What Barfmaker said, also shipping's always going to be driven by demand.
 
2013-08-13 01:30:55 PM  
I've never seen a container ship with its own cranes before. Is that new, or a recent Chinese thing?
 
2013-08-13 01:38:27 PM  
Hey, Christopher Columbus!  Look at what they're doing.  FARK YOU, CHRIS!  HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAAA!!!
 
2013-08-13 01:40:04 PM  
with 372 permits granted in 2013, up from four in 2010.

You need a permit to sail in the ocean? Who hands those out?
 
2013-08-13 01:46:13 PM  

SordidEuphemism: >The trip is about 12 to 15 days shorter than the current route, which is much longer

How much longer, do you think? In days?


Let's see, it's four school buses per blue whale, ... carry the Volkswagon... and we get a fortnight, more or less
 
2013-08-13 01:46:16 PM  

nytmare: with 372 permits granted in 2013, up from four in 2010.

You need a permit to sail in the ocean? Who hands those out?


Chtulhu.
 
2013-08-13 01:47:07 PM  
Barfmaker:

ikanreed: Yay, now we can run even more container ships, burning even more low-grade kerosene. That won't make things worse at all!

FTA: The trip is about 12 to 15 days shorter than the current route,

It saves a metric assload of fuel, go panic about something else.


And it's not even low-grade kerosene... Bluewater ships like that burn #6 bunkering fuel, which is barely a step above road tar. The stuff is so thick and skanky you have to heat it in order to pump it.

Anything that knocks off a few weeks off the trip is a *good* thing.

If you want to worry about the environment, worry about the deep water oil extraction that Russia and Canada are planning now that the ice is going, or the fact that big-ticket Asian products are going to get even cheaper in the west.
 
2013-08-13 01:56:49 PM  

SordidEuphemism: >The trip is about 12 to 15 days shorter than the current route, which is much longer

How much longer, do you think? In days?


Fast ship? You've never heard of the Ming Falcon? It's the ship that made the Antwerp Run in less than twelve thousand kilometers.
 
2013-08-13 02:16:04 PM  
This makes for an interesting question, if anyone is looking for a research paper topic...

At what point will the traffic of cargo ships, which burn the nastiest, most particulate-laden fuel short of brown coal, have a measurable effect on the albedo of the Arctic pack ice and pretty much ensure the passage opens every year?

It's a big place, but running the equivalent of 372 small power plants with minimal emission controls through the area has to be dumping a fair amount of soot. At some density of traffic it would be as if they were laying down their own track of snow-melt behind them.
 
2013-08-13 03:16:18 PM  

nytmare: with 372 permits granted in 2013, up from four in 2010.


Clearly the conclusion here is that global warming is up nearly 10,000% since 2010, and that the Northeast passage covers the entire surface of the earf.
 
2013-08-13 03:27:36 PM  
SevenizGud:

nytmare: with 372 permits granted in 2013, up from four in 2010.

Clearly the conclusion here is that global warming is up nearly 10,000% since 2010, and that the Northeast passage covers the entire surface of the earf.


If that's the logical conclusion you came up with from that statement, I have to say... You have a head full of bad wiring, son.
 
2013-08-13 03:47:17 PM  

Barfmaker: ikanreed: Yay, now we can run even more container ships, burning even more low-grade kerosene.  That won't make things worse at all!

FTA: The trip is about 12 to 15 days shorter than the current route,

It saves a metric assload of fuel, go panic about something else.


That is a broken premise.  Container ships aren't kept in drydock for months at a time.  This simply means that the number of trips they can take increase.  Prices go down, more ships go on the seas.  learn2capitalism.
 
2013-08-13 05:26:43 PM  
ikanreed:

Barfmaker: ikanreed: Yay, now we can run even more container ships, burning even more low-grade kerosene. That won't make things worse at all!

FTA: The trip is about 12 to 15 days shorter than the current route,

It saves a metric assload of fuel, go panic about something else.

That is a broken premise. Container ships aren't kept in drydock for months at a time. This simply means that the number of trips they can take increase. Prices go down, more ships go on the seas. learn2capitalism.


Equivalent to 15-16 days per trip? Heck, I wish TFA had mentioned how long a Shenzou to Amsterdam trip took.


Not to say you're wrong, but if you can come up with some numbers that might be helpful.
 
2013-08-13 05:52:22 PM  
Go global warming!!  Woo-hoo!

Actually, the opening of this passage is a tangile benefit for mankind (cheaper and quicker shipment of goods around the planet is a good thing for the planet on balance).  You really do need to factor in benefits like this when computing the costs of global warming.
 
2013-08-13 06:27:26 PM  

maxheck: ikanreed:

Barfmaker: ikanreed: Yay, now we can run even more container ships, burning even more low-grade kerosene. That won't make things worse at all!

FTA: The trip is about 12 to 15 days shorter than the current route,

It saves a metric assload of fuel, go panic about something else.

That is a broken premise. Container ships aren't kept in drydock for months at a time. This simply means that the number of trips they can take increase. Prices go down, more ships go on the seas. learn2capitalism.

Equivalent to 15-16 days per trip? Heck, I wish TFA had mentioned how long a Shenzou to Amsterdam trip took.


Not to say you're wrong, but if you can come up with some numbers that might be helpful.


The new route takes up to 35 days and saves up to 15 days. Would you like a calculator?
 
2013-08-13 08:48:48 PM  
 
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