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(C|Net)   Truck driver uses GPS jammer to successfully prevent his boss from tracking his whereabouts. Finds out that FCC can still track him   (news.cnet.com) divider line 156
    More: Dumbass, Newark Airport, GPS, newark, GPS jammer, CBS New York  
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15404 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Aug 2013 at 10:02 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



156 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-08-12 10:05:01 AM
Jam trifecta in play!!!
 
2013-08-12 10:05:19 AM
There subby a word.
 
2013-08-12 10:05:44 AM
His what, subtard?
 
2013-08-12 10:05:56 AM
He succesfulled the whole thing?
 
2013-08-12 10:06:14 AM
wife?  boss?  pimp?  what's the missing word?
 
2013-08-12 10:06:46 AM
Oh god. He's managed to piss ofF the FAA and the FCC?

Their methods are unspeakable.

i.cdn.turner.com

/fignuts!
 
2013-08-12 10:06:49 AM
We don't know whether successfully his tracking.
 
2013-08-12 10:07:26 AM
The FCC won't let him be, or let him be he
 
2013-08-12 10:08:08 AM
Prevent his what from tracking him?

Employer?

Parole officer?

Mother?

Mysterious past?
 
2013-08-12 10:09:47 AM
31 thousands? There's bankers that get hit with less than that for fraud. Might as well send him to jail, there's no way he's going to be able to pay this - especially since he's now unemployed.
 
2013-08-12 10:10:20 AM

hardinparamedic: Oh god. He's managed to piss ofF the FAA and the FCC?

Their methods are unspeakable.

[i.cdn.turner.com image 400x300]

/fignuts!


HEY!  Don't talk about your mother that way!
 
2013-08-12 10:10:24 AM
Subby accidentally the headline.
 
2013-08-12 10:10:46 AM
So Bojczak was fined $31,875 on Friday. And, yes, he was also fired for his misdirection.

Putting a GPS jammer in a company vehicle? Yeah, that sounds like grounds for automatic firing. If you don't want your employer to track you, drive your own truck.

On the other hand, an airport charged with landing airplanes worth hundreds of millions of dollars would seem to warrant having a system that can't be blocked with a $100 jammer.
 
2013-08-12 10:10:49 AM
My from knows where I am.

Always.
 
2013-08-12 10:11:28 AM
Insta-green for maximum humiliation of Subby for his headline fail?
 
2013-08-12 10:11:48 AM

I love these games!



His penis?
His cat?
His Obamacare card?
His Own Personal Jesus?
 
2013-08-12 10:12:42 AM
What disturbs me most is that an airport utilizing this new Smartpath system can be easily jammed by a sub-100 dollar GPS jammer. What kind of havoc can that cause at any Smartpath airport if it was used specifically for jamming those signals?
 
2013-08-12 10:12:55 AM

Eps05: 31 thousands? There's bankers that get hit with less than that for fraud. Might as well send him to jail, there's no way he's going to be able to pay this - especially since he's now unemployed.


[citation needed]
 
2013-08-12 10:12:56 AM
The whole thing?
 
2013-08-12 10:14:03 AM
What the fark point was he trying to prove by jamming his employers GPS?
 
2013-08-12 10:15:30 AM

Snarfangel: So Bojczak was fined $31,875 on Friday. And, yes, he was also fired for his misdirection.

Putting a GPS jammer in a company vehicle? Yeah, that sounds like grounds for automatic firing. If you don't want your employer to track you, drive your own truck.

On the other hand, an airport charged with landing airplanes worth hundreds of millions of dollars would seem to warrant having a system that can't be blocked with a $100 jammer.


The Chinese jammers I've encountered spew about a watt of noise at and significantly above and below L1 and L2 GPS frequencies. This will totally obliterate the milliwatt signal being received by any GPS receiver.
 
2013-08-12 10:16:30 AM

Snarfangel: On the other hand, an airport charged with landing airplanes worth hundreds of millions of dollars would seem to warrant having a system that can't be blocked with a $100 jammer.


You are aware of how GPS works and how weak the signals actually are? There is a reason that we have laws restricting broadcasting.
 
2013-08-12 10:16:39 AM
The admins can rewrite the headline if they notice it
 
2013-08-12 10:16:43 AM

PunkTiger: What disturbs me most is that an airport utilizing this new Smartpath system can be easily jammed by a sub-100 dollar GPS jammer. What kind of havoc can that cause at any Smartpath airport if it was used specifically for jamming those signals?


It's simple physics.  You put out a radio signal that overwhelms the weak satellite signals, it's going to effect everyone in the area that's using a GPS.

The better solution, if you don't want to be tracked all the time, is to cover the GPS antenna with something metal, like aluminum foil or a wire mesh.  That will block the signal at your receiver without farking it up for everyone else.
 
2013-08-12 10:17:56 AM
Go home, subby, you are drunk.
 
2013-08-12 10:17:58 AM

Lt_Ryan: Snarfangel: On the other hand, an airport charged with landing airplanes worth hundreds of millions of dollars would seem to warrant having a system that can't be blocked with a $100 jammer.

You are aware of how GPS works and how weak the signals actually are? There is a reason that we have laws restricting broadcasting.


Not to mention this isn't something that, had it failed, would result in planes falling out of the sky or something.
 
2013-08-12 10:17:59 AM
I'll take this opportunity to remind the cell phone jammers out there that your cheap jammers from China or India will often interfere with a broad swath of other radio frequencies, including GPS.

Have fun.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cellular_frequencies#United_States_Carr ie r_Frequency_Use
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_Positioning_System#Satellite_fre qu encies
 
2013-08-12 10:19:09 AM

RottNDude: Snarfangel: So Bojczak was fined $31,875 on Friday. And, yes, he was also fired for his misdirection.

Putting a GPS jammer in a company vehicle? Yeah, that sounds like grounds for automatic firing. If you don't want your employer to track you, drive your own truck.

On the other hand, an airport charged with landing airplanes worth hundreds of millions of dollars would seem to warrant having a system that can't be blocked with a $100 jammer.

The Chinese jammers I've encountered spew about a watt of noise at and significantly above and below L1 and L2 GPS frequencies. This will totally obliterate the milliwatt signal being received by any GPS receiver.


Slap one on a weather balloon, and you've got a way to keep any drones in the general area from knowing precisely where there are.
 
2013-08-12 10:19:11 AM
 
2013-08-12 10:19:11 AM
Surprised he wasn't visited by Homeland Security

and / or

Hey boss. Where's my paycheck?
I dunno. Someone must have a paycheck jammer installed.
 
gja [TotalFark]
2013-08-12 10:19:24 AM
www.stripersonline.com

I hope they make an example of this azzhole.
 
2013-08-12 10:19:39 AM

Snarfangel: So Bojczak was fined $31,875 on Friday. And, yes, he was also fired for his misdirection.

Putting a GPS jammer in a company vehicle? Yeah, that sounds like grounds for automatic firing. If you don't want your employer to track you, drive your own truck.

On the other hand, an airport charged with landing airplanes worth hundreds of millions of dollars would seem to warrant having a system that can't be blocked with a $100 jammer.


That should be the real story here, and I wish they went more in depth on how much trouble it actually caused them. Were people at risk? Could you plant a few of those around the airport and get planes to run into each other? Seems insane how much we pay for airport security just to be able to shut the whole thing down for under $100
 
2013-08-12 10:19:45 AM
You mean, Die Hard II could actually happen?
 
2013-08-12 10:20:03 AM

karmaceutical: What the fark point was he trying to prove by jamming his employers GPS?


Maybe his boss was a member of the Tea Party and he wanted to show his lack of intelligence to impress him/her.
 
2013-08-12 10:20:16 AM

Snarfangel: On the other hand, an airport charged with landing airplanes worth hundreds of millions of dollars would seem to warrant having a system that can't be blocked with a $100 jammer.


PunkTiger: What disturbs me most is that an airport utilizing this new Smartpath system can be easily jammed by a sub-100 dollar GPS jammer. What kind of havoc can that cause at any Smartpath airport if it was used specifically for jamming those signals?


At the end of the day, a radio signal is just a radio signal. If you're trying to use a particular band for something, there's not much you can do if someone comes along and pumps out a ton of noise in the same band. The best you can really do is keep potential sources of noise physically away from the area, but since it's a whole airport....

Kinda like how the sweetest laptop or electronic doodad money can buy won't hold up well to being bashed with a big-ass rock.
 
2013-08-12 10:22:43 AM

PandaPorn: karmaceutical: What the fark point was he trying to prove by jamming his employers GPS?

Maybe his boss was a member of the Tea Party and he wanted to show his lack of intelligence to impress him/her.


I hope you stretched before doing that much over reaching into derp.
 
2013-08-12 10:22:47 AM

HAMMERTOE: You mean, Die Hard II could actually happen?


Yes, absolutely. But instead of planes crashing, the planes would be mildly inconvenienced.
 
2013-08-12 10:22:51 AM
And I don't see how this yokel would think this would work for long, the systems I dealt with at a cell carrier (big red logo, rhymes with horizon) had an option for the tracking software to poll the transcievers every so often, and if one didn't connect for a certain length of time, it would notify the appropriate customer. Also had geofencing, upper limits on speed, et cetera. Of course this was back in the mid to late 2000s, don't know what parameters they've got now.
 
2013-08-12 10:23:32 AM

karmaceutical: What the fark point was he trying to prove by jamming his employers GPS?


That "the man" couldn't keep him down or some such shiat, I'm sure....

We have people biatch about the locators we have on all our vehicles here at work...

Employee: "You're just tracking me  to see if I'm doing something wrong!"

My response:  "And?"
 
2013-08-12 10:24:13 AM

karmaceutical: What the fark point was he trying to prove by jamming his employers GPS?


A) That he could
B) He was most likely doing shiat his employers didn't want him to do on company time. If you're supposed to be at a specific address for 8 hours a day, but the GPS is showing you spending those 8 hours running errands around town, you're gonna get your ass fired.

He should be fired anyway. Make it a little harder to pay back that $32K fine.
 
2013-08-12 10:25:07 AM
I would think the way to go would be with a faraday cage.
 
2013-08-12 10:26:09 AM

Snarfangel: So Bojczak was fined $31,875 on Friday. And, yes, he was also fired for his misdirection.

Putting a GPS jammer in a company vehicle? Yeah, that sounds like grounds for automatic firing. If you don't want your employer to track you, drive your own truck.



Well, even then, you still have to be accountable for your wherabouts.  If for no other reason that you will presumably be charging by the mile for the usage of your vehicle.
Still, this seems like an excessive fine.  It's not like this guy did anything intentional to disrupt the airport.

I must say, though...  It's impressive that that jammer has such a range that it extended as far as the control tower.  We're talking hundreds of yards from the TP.  And what I REALLY want to know is, if he was jamming everything, how the hell did they figure out that it was HIM doing it.  He must have been driving at 75mph, and was probably only in the vicinity for a minute or so.

//Lando:  How can they be jaming us if they don't know that...  That we're coming?  Break off the attack!  All craft pull up!!
 
2013-08-12 10:26:35 AM

Towermonkey: And I don't see how this yokel would think this would work for long, the systems I dealt with at a cell carrier (big red logo, rhymes with horizon) had an option for the tracking software to poll the transcievers every so often, and if one didn't connect for a certain length of time, it would notify the appropriate customer. Also had geofencing, upper limits on speed, et cetera. Of course this was back in the mid to late 2000s, don't know what parameters they've got now.


"Honestly, I have no idea why the system didn't work, maybe there is a funky connection somewhere that only jars loose during movement, or maybe only when it's hot".
 
2013-08-12 10:28:20 AM

PunkTiger: What disturbs me most is that an airport utilizing this new Smartpath system can be easily jammed by a sub-100 dollar GPS jammer. What kind of havoc can that cause at any Smartpath airport if it was used specifically for jamming those signals?


The system only works because everyone plays by the rules. A radio signal from a satellite in orbit will spread over a large portion of the earth's surface, and it only has one tiny antenna powered by a solar array. You can't install a 1000-watt broadcasting tower on every GPS satellite, it's not physically possible.

An analogy: the GPS receiver has the job of listening for a what is barely a whisper. The GPS receiver just isn't going to be able to do that unless everyone agrees that they're going to be very, very quiet. A jammer is the equivalent of a guy walking into the quiet room playing an instrument.

Rest assured: the airport has SOME contingency plan in place, just in case the GPS stops working (which they can and do all the time... GPS is weak enough to be drowned out by solar activity, on occasion). But you can be sure that contingency isn't as safe or as comfortable as the GPS solution. Pilots are still trained to do things manually in the event that everything hits the fan, but you couldn't pay me enough money to be on that thing.
 
2013-08-12 10:29:14 AM

Snarfangel: So Bojczak was fined $31,875 on Friday. And, yes, he was also fired for his misdirection.

Putting a GPS jammer in a company vehicle? Yeah, that sounds like grounds for automatic firing. If you don't want your employer to track you, drive your own truck.

On the other hand, an airport charged with landing airplanes worth hundreds of millions of dollars would seem to warrant having a system that can't be blocked with a $100 jammer.


Any system that relies on RF energy for communications can be interfered with.  That includes GPS, cell phones, tv, and so on.  One exception would be microwave ovens.  The guy would have gotten away with it much longer if he had used a jammer that didn't have such a large coverage area.  All he would have needed is a jammer that would cover the truck.  He didn't need one that had a range of a few hundred yards.
 
2013-08-12 10:30:04 AM

dittybopper: The better solution, if you don't want to be tracked all the time, is to cover the GPS antenna with something metal, like aluminum foil or a wire mesh be a trustworthy employee who doesn't spend all day at strip clubs while on the clock.

 
2013-08-12 10:31:24 AM

durbnpoisn: Snarfangel: So Bojczak was fined $31,875 on Friday. And, yes, he was also fired for his misdirection.

Putting a GPS jammer in a company vehicle? Yeah, that sounds like grounds for automatic firing. If you don't want your employer to track you, drive your own truck.


Well, even then, you still have to be accountable for your wherabouts.  If for no other reason that you will presumably be charging by the mile for the usage of your vehicle.
Still, this seems like an excessive fine.  It's not like this guy did anything intentional to disrupt the airport.

I must say, though...  It's impressive that that jammer has such a range that it extended as far as the control tower.  We're talking hundreds of yards from the TP.  And what I REALLY want to know is, if he was jamming everything, how the hell did they figure out that it was HIM doing it.  He must have been driving at 75mph, and was probably only in the vicinity for a minute or so.

//Lando:  How can they be jaming us if they don't know that...  That we're coming?  Break off the attack!  All craft pull up!!


I, too, would like some details about how they actually found him.  I doubt it was a one-time thing, though - I'm sure after the first time or two someone realized, hey, some asshole is pumping out static on the GPS band and it only happens for a few minutes a day so it's likely someone on the move.  Not sure what step 2 would be, though.  Get some guys with directional antennae and follow the signal?

/Radio is not my forte
//Really interested in learning more about it
///Spend too much time on Fark to get anywhere
 
2013-08-12 10:31:55 AM

durbnpoisn: Snarfangel: So Bojczak was fined $31,875 on Friday. And, yes, he was also fired for his misdirection.

Putting a GPS jammer in a company vehicle? Yeah, that sounds like grounds for automatic firing. If you don't want your employer to track you, drive your own truck.


Well, even then, you still have to be accountable for your wherabouts.  If for no other reason that you will presumably be charging by the mile for the usage of your vehicle.
Still, this seems like an excessive fine.  It's not like this guy did anything intentional to disrupt the airport.

I must say, though...  It's impressive that that jammer has such a range that it extended as far as the control tower.  We're talking hundreds of yards from the TP.  And what I REALLY want to know is, if he was jamming everything, how the hell did they figure out that it was HIM doing it.  He must have been driving at 75mph, and was probably only in the vicinity for a minute or so.

//Lando:  How can they be jaming us if they don't know that...  That we're coming?  Break off the attack!  All craft pull up!!


If you radiate, they can find you.  And if you radiate constantly, really all they have to do to figure out who it is that is causing the temporary outages is to put a receiver keyed up to a video camera that records who is going by.  Have it store images from the very peak of the interference.

Then, all you have to do is look for the one vehicle that shows up in most or all of the images.

Either that, or just use basic radio direction finding techniques like those used by military intelligence, the FCC, and ham radio operators.  It's easy enough to do that I had some 8, 9 and 10 year old kids finding a hidden transmitter with a simple hand-held antenna from half a mile away.
 
2013-08-12 10:33:53 AM

PunkTiger: What disturbs me most is that an airport utilizing this new Smartpath system can be easily jammed by a sub-100 dollar GPS jammer. What kind of havoc can that cause at any Smartpath airport if it was used specifically for jamming those signals?




They should ban it. That way no one will do it.

Profit!
 
2013-08-12 10:38:05 AM

The Slush: dittybopper: The better solution, if you don't want to be tracked all the time,

is tocover the GPS antenna with something metal, like aluminum foil or a wire mesh be a trustworthy employee who doesn't spend all day at strip clubs while on the clock.

Even if you are a trustworthy employee who doesn't spend all day at strip clubs while on the clock, you may not really want to be tracked.  Especially if you get dinged for things like going a bit over the speed limit in order to make a scheduled delivery on time, or because you don't want your boss to know you've got an overactive bladder and need to take frequent piss breaks, or because you simply have an aversion to being micromanaged, which is why you became a driver in the first place, so you don't have a boss looking over your shoulder the whole time.
 
2013-08-12 10:38:59 AM
StoPPeRmobile:They should ban it. That way no one will do it. Profit!

Yeah. Laws don't serve any purpose because people still break them. We need to throw out the entire USC! Goodbye any regulation! Yay libertarian paradise!

www.dripmagazine.com
 
2013-08-12 10:39:34 AM
I drove deliveries for a big chain auto supply house and they started doing the GPS tracking, but they were small handheld units (to be on your person the whole time you were driving/delivering).

They started writing people up for things like stopping at the quickmart for a soda or diverging from the designated route (even if you could prove it was to avoid traffic or an accident).

Magically my unit quit working. The uptime counter showed it'd been on the whole time, just for *some* reason it'd lose signal about 5 min out, and regain about 5 min before I got back.

It might have had something to do with the steel ammo can I started keeping in my backpack. I just wanted to make sure the company property didn't get damaged and all.
 
2013-08-12 10:40:22 AM

dittybopper: Towermonkey: And I don't see how this yokel would think this would work for long, the systems I dealt with at a cell carrier (big red logo, rhymes with horizon) had an option for the tracking software to poll the transcievers every so often, and if one didn't connect for a certain length of time, it would notify the appropriate customer. Also had geofencing, upper limits on speed, et cetera. Of course this was back in the mid to late 2000s, don't know what parameters they've got now.

"Honestly, I have no idea why the system didn't work, maybe there is a funky connection somewhere that only jars loose during movement, or maybe only when it's hot".


Lol when I did tech support I can't tell you how many phones/telemetry gadgets were exhaustively analyzed (and I mean really thoroughly tested) and sent back with a big yellow No Trouble Found sticker on them.

Also, when Big Red rolled out the Chaperone GPS feature for phones, I couldn't tell you how many times I had people questioning me on EXACTLY how the system worked so they could try to spy on kids, loved ones, etc. Ugh. Made my head hurt. Glad I am out of that game now.
 
2013-08-12 10:44:23 AM
durbnpoisn:

I must say, though...  It's impressive that that jammer has such a range that it extended as far as the control tower.  We're talking hundreds of yards from the TP.  And what I REALLY want to know is, if he was jamming everything, how the hell did they figure out that it was HIM doing it.  He must have been driving at 75mph, and was probably only in the vicinity for a minute or so.

They probably did not catch him on his first pass.  The airport probably notified the FCC that there was intermittent disruption in service and so the FCC sent out a crew with radio direction finders to look for the source.  It's fairly easy to triangulate, but probably still required a little smart detective work.

As for the tower, the Smartpath system likely only involves the tower from a management standpoint.  It's a precision ILS system, so it probably has broadcast points located at key parts of the approach paths.  They wouldn't necessarily install anything in the tower itself.  I'm not about to Google how it works because I don't need the NSA knocking on my door.
 
2013-08-12 10:44:56 AM
Came for all the people who don't understand GPS.

Leaving satisfied that somehow this guy's boss has his own satellite.
 
2013-08-12 10:45:48 AM
Fubini:
Rest assured: the airport has SOME contingency plan in place, just in case the GPS stops working (which they can and do all the time... GPS is weak enough to be drowned out by solar activity, on occasion). But you can be sure that contingency isn't as safe or as comfortable as the GPS solution. Pilots are still trained to do things manually in the event that everything hits the fan, but you couldn't pay me enough money to be on that thing.

Oh crap, the GPS is out.  I guess I'll just resort to about 3 other approach/landing radio-nav systems.  GPS is nice, absolutely.  However it is not really necessary for any flying.
 
2013-08-12 10:46:38 AM

durbnpoisn: I must say, though...  It's impressive that that jammer has such a range that it extended as far as the control tower.  We're talking hundreds of yards from the TP.  And what I REALLY want to know is, if he was jamming everything, how the hell did they figure out that it was HIM doing it.  He must have been driving at 75mph, and was probably only in the vicinity for a minute or so.


Most of these jammers operate on the principle of spewing garbage into the RF spectrum as powerfully as they can. Radio waves travel a significant distance, and in the case of GPS you're talking about drowning out a fantastically tiny signal: about -130dBm. They run about 100-200 attowatts, or equivalently about 10,000,000,000,000 less powerful than a milliwatt radio signal. GPS/Cell phone jammers can generate signals in excess of a whole watt.

So to answer your question: the GPS jammer likely spews a tremendous amount of interference into the area, which would be detectable over some distance. Given that you're overwhelming a signal that is literally trillions of times less powerful, his single GPS jammer could likely disrupt any GPS reciever for miles (given appropriate line-of-sight). In the terms of RF spectrum, he had the equivalent of lighthouse on his truck, it's not surprising he got caught.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DBm
 
2013-08-12 10:46:51 AM

RottNDude: The Chinese jammers I've encountered spew about a watt of noise at and significantly above and below L1 and L2 GPS frequencies. This will totally obliterate the milliwatt signal being received by any GPS receiver.


GPS was developed as a military system.

I'm sure there are military GPS receivers that use directional antennas (phased array) that strongly reject any signals that don't come from where the satellites are supposed to be.

It would be pretty pointless to have a crucial military system that can be trivially jammed. Then again the specs on how jam-resistant such systems are I'm sure are highly classified and they would never release such systems for commercial navigation uses.
 
2013-08-12 10:47:13 AM
There's a much easier way to do it, and it doesn't involve jamming. Just build a mini Faraday cage. The grounding will be tricky though - the car ground may work but a drag chain might help too.

Place the GPS antenna and receiver in said Faraday cage. Problem solved.
 
2013-08-12 10:47:55 AM
My car radar detector will alert me if the cops try and shut my detector off.
 
2013-08-12 10:50:00 AM

HairBolus: RottNDude: The Chinese jammers I've encountered spew about a watt of noise at and significantly above and below L1 and L2 GPS frequencies. This will totally obliterate the milliwatt signal being received by any GPS receiver.

GPS was developed as a military system.

I'm sure there are military GPS receivers that use directional antennas (phased array) that strongly reject any signals that don't come from where the satellites are supposed to be.

It would be pretty pointless to have a crucial military system that can be trivially jammed. Then again the specs on how jam-resistant such systems are I'm sure are highly classified and they would never release such systems for commercial navigation uses.



Oh I'm quite certain they have that.  The military must have some kind of system that lets the vehicles and facilities know exactly where they are at any point in time so they can properly triangulate where to aim the GPS antennas.
 
2013-08-12 10:50:16 AM

Snarfangel: So Bojczak was fined $31,875 on Friday. And, yes, he was also fired for his misdirection.

Putting a GPS jammer in a company vehicle? Yeah, that sounds like grounds for automatic firing. If you don't want your employer to track you, drive your own truck.

On the other hand, an airport charged with landing airplanes worth hundreds of millions of dollars would seem to warrant having a system that can't be blocked with a $100 jammer.


Physics are physics. All signals can be jammed. You can still land a plane without GPS.
 
2013-08-12 10:50:25 AM

kd1s: There's a much easier way to do it, and it doesn't involve jamming. Just build a mini Faraday cage. The grounding will be tricky though - the car ground may work but a drag chain might help too.

Place the GPS antenna and receiver in said Faraday cage. Problem solved.


I don't think you would need to ground a Faraday cage to block the signal to the antenna.
 
2013-08-12 10:51:02 AM

PaLarkin: One exception would be microwave ovens.


www.bugsweeps.com
 
2013-08-12 10:52:05 AM

dittybopper: Slap one on a weather balloon, and you've got a way to keep any drones in the general area from knowing precisely where there are.


That's one way to put yourself out of HARM's way.

/Are you sure that it's a good idea to tell farkers how to jam?
 
2013-08-12 10:53:09 AM

dittybopper: The Slush: dittybopper: The better solution, if you don't want to be tracked all the time, is tocover the GPS antenna with something metal, like aluminum foil or a wire mesh be a trustworthy employee who doesn't spend all day at strip clubs while on the clock.

Even if you are a trustworthy employee who doesn't spend all day at strip clubs while on the clock, you may not really want to be tracked.  Especially if you get dinged for things like going a bit over the speed limit in order to make a scheduled delivery on time, or because you don't want your boss to know you've got an overactive bladder and need to take frequent piss breaks, or because you simply have an aversion to being micromanaged, which is why you became a driver in the first place, so you don't have a boss looking over your shoulder the whole time.


The other side of that is when my office gets a call from some pissed off ratepayer (govt entity here) saying they saw vehicle #234 going "at least 90mph down Highway 80, almost blew me off the road when he passed me, while talking on his cell phone and sucking on a bong while an underage hooker rimmed his asshole", I can immediately call up vehicle #234 and see that vehicle has actually been parked at one of our satellite yards for the last 4 days and the top speed we have recorded for it in the last two weeks has been 57mph and it has not been on Highway 80 in that same time period.
With that information, I can politely tell the caller to go fark themselves and please call again if they have any further complaints.

People may not like being tracked, but it saves their ass as often as it kicks it....
 
2013-08-12 10:53:16 AM

Matthew Keene: PaLarkin: One exception would be microwave ovens.

[www.bugsweeps.com image 570x326]


WTF.

Is that for real?
 
2013-08-12 10:54:13 AM
www.melecotte.com
 
2013-08-12 10:55:09 AM

Deep Contact: My car radar detector will alert me if the cops try and shut my detector off.


???  More info please.......
 
2013-08-12 10:55:54 AM
Snarfangel: On the other hand, an airport charged with landing airplanes worth hundreds of millions of dollars would seem to warrant having a system that can't be blocked with a $100 jammer.

Yeah, this is pretty much an open invitation to mayhem. Fark.
 
2013-08-12 10:58:14 AM

hardinparamedic: Is that for real?


Yes it is. A nerd neighbor with a chip on his shoulder can be dangerous.

hacknmod.com
 
2013-08-12 10:58:58 AM

HAMMERTOE: You mean, Die Hard II could actually happen?


Well, not the ejection seat in the commercial airliner part.
 
2013-08-12 10:59:31 AM

Stone Meadow: Snarfangel: On the other hand, an airport charged with landing airplanes worth hundreds of millions of dollars would seem to warrant having a system that can't be blocked with a $100 jammer.

Yeah, this is pretty much an open invitation to mayhem. Fark.


Even if everyone lands OK, and from what I'm told there is a LOT of redundancy built into the system so that they do, just the event of a dozen of these gagiggers being activated in Ohare would cause enough panic to cost millions of dollars in studies and whatnot.  And at the end of the day there would be a billion dollar upgrade.

/rats!
 
2013-08-12 10:59:40 AM

BMFPitt: Physics are physics. All signals can be jammed. You can still land a plane without GPS.


Um. Want to know how I know?
 
2013-08-12 11:03:20 AM
FTFA: No reasonable employee wants their boss to know where they are all the time.
Just as no reasonable boss wants his employees to know where she is all the time.


Especially during the "He's a Diva" contest night...
 
2013-08-12 11:06:37 AM

BafflerMeal: HairBolus: RottNDude: The Chinese jammers I've encountered spew about a watt of noise at and significantly above and below L1 and L2 GPS frequencies. This will totally obliterate the milliwatt signal being received by any GPS receiver.

GPS was developed as a military system.

I'm sure there are military GPS receivers that use directional antennas (phased array) that strongly reject any signals that don't come from where the satellites are supposed to be.

It would be pretty pointless to have a crucial military system that can be trivially jammed. Then again the specs on how jam-resistant such systems are I'm sure are highly classified and they would never release such systems for commercial navigation uses.


Oh I'm quite certain they have that.  The military must have some kind of system that lets the vehicles and facilities know exactly where they are at any point in time so they can properly triangulate where to aim the GPS antennas.


Umm, a sophisticated system should determine the vectors to the jamming sources so that they can be cancelled out, meanwhile using inertial navigation and at worst crude approximations such as "up in the sky" for the good sources. Think of GPS as a way to calibrate inertial navigation systems.
 
2013-08-12 11:07:39 AM
Our drivers think that the vans have GPS trackers on them. They don't. It all stems from one of our old drivers sleeping in the parking lots of our clients in the van. We have some great video with close ups of him knocked out on the clock every day. The first time we wrote him up and warned him the 2nd time he got fired. But he was better the second time he parked behind a dumpster at the warehouse, but missed the giant bubble cam there.
 
2013-08-12 11:10:09 AM
a jam thread?  Jam band thread?  It's all fun and games until the bass solo, then everybody cries
 
2013-08-12 11:11:01 AM
www.ladyofthecake.com
 
2013-08-12 11:12:50 AM
Gary Bojczak may have thought this a sound investment. For, as CBS New York reports, he admitted to investigators that he put one in the truck he drove on behalf of an engineering company called Tilcon.

Author fail.  Tilcon isn't an engineering company.

They the largest/one of the largest asphalt paving companies in NJ and the biggest aggregate producers in the state.  Their paving division is massive, they own a shiatload of quarries, sand pits, asphalt plants, plus they do some bridge work.
 
2013-08-12 11:14:23 AM

HairBolus: It would be pretty pointless to have a crucial military system that can be trivially jammed. Then again the specs on how jam-resistant such systems are I'm sure are highly classified and they would never release such systems for commercial navigation uses.


Not really- all jamming happens at the receiver, not the transmitter, so GPS works perfectly well until you're within range of an enemy using a jammer. If that drops out, switch over to one of the many redundant systems until it works again.

So, for example, an aircraft flying in from someplace remote (e.g. a carrier, Scott AFB in Missouri) can use GPS all the way until they're right on top of the enemy, they fight, the plane leaves and can use GPS again. Same for naval ships (horizon line is about 10-20 miles, beyond line of sight no jamming is possible). People on the ground have been doing land-nav for years, and again you have the problem of line-of-sight. The jamming distance is going to be severely reduced, or the jammer is going to be very vulnerable (on top of a hill).

Beyond that, a working GPS signal actually requires 3-4 satellites, though many more are preferable. If you're talking directional antenna, you're talking at least 3, but probably as many as 7-8 to get a good GPS lock. At this point, your military GPS system weighs as much as a car... not terribly practical for a device designed to help you navigate.

No, the military uses regular GPS technology, but their signal is encrypted so they know the signal is authentic. That's it.
 
2013-08-12 11:15:56 AM

kd1s: There's a much easier way to do it, and it doesn't involve jamming. Just build a mini Faraday cage. The grounding will be tricky though - the car ground may work but a drag chain might help too.

Place the GPS antenna and receiver in said Faraday cage. Problem solved.


You don't have to ground the faraday cage.

Wrap the antenna with foil.  Problem solved.  No RF is going to penetrate, especially not at the weak signal levels we're talking about.  A faraday cage only needs to be grounded for things like lighting protection purposes.  If you merely want to block RF, it doesn't have to be grounded.
 
2013-08-12 11:16:35 AM
Back in the 80s, we used to play foxhunt on our CB radios.

One guy would have 30 minutes to hide, our rules were no private property and stay in the county...and then the rest of us would try to find them using our radios and basically playing 'marco polo' until we could get headlights on them.

In a county as bug as Marathon (central Wisconsin) this could take a while.

And even back then, if you ran too much oomph into your sideband amp, the FCC would find you one day and have a lovely chat with you. And, yes, they COULD take your truck with the radio in it if you stepped on enough transmissions.
 
2013-08-12 11:16:54 AM

Satanic_Hamster: Gary Bojczak may have thought this a sound investment. For, as CBS New York reports, he admitted to investigators that he put one in the truck he drove on behalf of an engineering company called Tilcon.

Author fail.  Tilcon isn't an engineering company.

They the largest/one of the largest asphalt paving companies in NJ and the biggest aggregate producers in the state.  Their paving division is massive, they own a shiatload of quarries, sand pits, asphalt plants, plus they do some bridge work.


So he is trying to mess with one of the "legit" businesses of the Mafia?
 
2013-08-12 11:16:56 AM

Clemkadidlefark: [www.melecotte.com image 400x600]


Only one man would dare give me the raspberry!
 
2013-08-12 11:17:08 AM

Satanic_Hamster: Gary Bojczak may have thought this a sound investment. For, as CBS New York reports, he admitted to investigators that he put one in the truck he drove on behalf of an engineering company called Tilcon.

Author fail.  Tilcon isn't an engineering company.

They the largest/one of the largest asphalt paving companies in NJ and the biggest aggregate producers in the state.  Their paving division is massive, they own a shiatload of quarries, sand pits, asphalt plants, plus they do some bridge work.


You're saying there's no engineering work involved in paving?
 
2013-08-12 11:19:03 AM

PunkTiger: What disturbs me most is that an airport utilizing this new Smartpath system can be easily jammed by a sub-100 dollar GPS jammer. What kind of havoc can that cause at any Smartpath airport if it was used specifically for jamming those signals?


This would make a great Bruce Willis movie!
 
2013-08-12 11:20:20 AM

demaL-demaL-yeH: dittybopper: Slap one on a weather balloon, and you've got a way to keep any drones in the general area from knowing precisely where there are.

That's one way to put yourself out of HARM's way.

/Are you sure that it's a good idea to tell farkers how to jam?


Heh.  Out of HARMs way.

Hey, I wasn't in the jamming business, I was in the interception business.  Everything I know about it, I know from open sources.
 
2013-08-12 11:20:30 AM
Jamming is old news. Now people are actively spoofing the signals to send auto-navigation systems off course.
 
2013-08-12 11:22:48 AM

HairBolus: So he is trying to mess with one of the "legit" businesses of the Mafia?


Worse.  Union!

chevydeuce: You're saying there's no engineering work involved in paving?


Tilcon is primarily known for their paving and quarries.  It's like describing a hospital as a restaurant because they have a cafeteria.
 
2013-08-12 11:23:00 AM
2.bp.blogspot.com
Jammer worth more than vehicle it's on.
 
2013-08-12 11:24:42 AM

Fubini: No, the military uses regular GPS technology, but their signal is encrypted so they know the signal is authentic. That's it.


You could still overwhelm it with a $100 GPS jammer on a $50 weather balloon.
 
2013-08-12 11:29:49 AM
Is this the guy from 2009, or did another dumbass disrupt the Newark airport?
http://www.economist.com/node/18304246
But in late 2009 engineers noticed that satellite-positioning receivers for a new navigation aid at Newark airport in New Jersey were suffering brief daily breaks in reception. Something was interfering with the signals from orbiting global positioning system (GPS) satellites. It took two months for investigators from the Federal Aviation Authority to track down the problem: a driver who passed by on the nearby New Jersey Turnpike each day had a cheap GPS jammer in his truck.
 
2013-08-12 11:29:54 AM

dittybopper: Fubini: No, the military uses regular GPS technology, but their signal is encrypted so they know the signal is authentic. That's it.

You could still overwhelm it with a $100 GPS jammer on a $50 weather balloon.


Don't worry. They have an app for that.

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-08-12 11:38:26 AM

dittybopper: You could still overwhelm it with a $100 GPS jammer on a $50 weather balloon.


I think the idea above was that you could use a phased array to make a jam-resistant GPS reciever. It would be... impractical, to say the least. Impossible maybe. The GPS signal is just SO weak. It's the weakest signal expressed on Wikipedia's dBm chart.

You would need incredibly precise antennas and directioning.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DBm
 
2013-08-12 11:39:02 AM

The Slush: dittybopper: The better solution, if you don't want to be tracked all the time, is to cover the GPS antenna with something metal, like aluminum foil or a wire mesh be a trustworthy employee who doesn't spend all day at strip clubs while on the clock.


If I spent all day at a strip club while on the clock, why would they need to track me? They'd know exactly where I was...at a strip club.
 
2013-08-12 11:40:54 AM

hardinparamedic: dittybopper: Fubini: No, the military uses regular GPS technology, but their signal is encrypted so they know the signal is authentic. That's it.

You could still overwhelm it with a $100 GPS jammer on a $50 weather balloon.

Don't worry. They have an app for that.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 220x147]


Actually, no, they don't.

Maximum slant range for a Stinger is around 15,000 feet.  At a 45 degree angle, that's a maximum height of around 10,000 feet.  And because balloons tend to be roughly the same temperature as the air surrounding them, seems to me it would be pretty difficult to get a lock on one with an infrared seeker.

Now, it would be relatively easy to target them using an anti-radiation missile, but then you're chasing $200 worth of stuff with a million dollar missile.  I'm willing to bet even the most cash-strapped insurgents could put up more jammers (if they deemed it necessary) then the US could send missiles.
 
2013-08-12 11:40:56 AM

Prof. Frink: The Slush: dittybopper: The better solution, if you don't want to be tracked all the time, is to cover the GPS antenna with something metal, like aluminum foil or a wire mesh be a trustworthy employee who doesn't spend all day at strip clubs while on the clock.

If I spent all day at a strip club while on the clock, why would they need to track me? They'd know exactly where I was...at a strip club.



No, no, no.  Your *truck* was at the strip club.  You were clearly on site doing your work as you should have been.  Plausible deniability, people.
 
2013-08-12 11:41:12 AM

dittybopper: Hey, I wasn't in the jamming business, I was in the interception business.  Everything I know about it, I know from open sources.


Think again: ECM platforms have Morse keys.
 
2013-08-12 11:43:13 AM

dittybopper: hardinparamedic: dittybopper: Fubini: No, the military uses regular GPS technology, but their signal is encrypted so they know the signal is authentic. That's it.

You could still overwhelm it with a $100 GPS jammer on a $50 weather balloon.

Don't worry. They have an app for that.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 220x147]

Actually, no, they don't.

Maximum slant range for a Stinger is around 15,000 feet.  At a 45 degree angle, that's a maximum height of around 10,000 feet.  And because balloons tend to be roughly the same temperature as the air surrounding them, seems to me it would be pretty difficult to get a lock on one with an infrared seeker.

Now, it would be relatively easy to target them using an anti-radiation missile, but then you're chasing $200 worth of stuff with a million dollar missile.  I'm willing to bet even the most cash-strapped insurgents could put up more jammers (if they deemed it necessary) then the US could send missiles.



Which explains alot about the United State's problems in one succinct statement.
 
2013-08-12 11:43:29 AM

HairBolus: It would be pretty pointless to have a crucial military system that can be trivially jammed. Then again the specs on how jam-resistant such systems are I'm sure are highly classified and they would never release such systems for commercial navigation uses.


I am no GPS expert by any means.  However, it would not be pointless to have GPS even if it can be easily jammed.  Over 95% of the time it will work just fine, because nobody is jamming it.  In the few cases where they are jamming it, you are no worse off than you were before.  And watching for people sending out jamming signals probably has a certain benefit.

As for the employee trying to keep his boss from knowing that he isn't where he's supposed to be, if I was the boss and I was using GPS to track them and his simply didn't report in, I'd be very, very suspicious.  When I installed a 2nd GPS unit and it wouldn't report either, that would be about the point where I told him "I dunno what you're doing, but I'm not going to pay you to do it".
 
2013-08-12 11:48:28 AM
I don't think he thought his clever plan through all the way.  If he knew that his company put a GPS tracker on the vehicle, and he actually thought they were paying attention to it, then he should also realize that they'd notice when his vehicle is the only one not reporting in.  That alone would be enough to be noticed.
 
2013-08-12 11:52:03 AM

demaL-demaL-yeH: dittybopper: Hey, I wasn't in the jamming business, I was in the interception business.  Everything I know about it, I know from open sources.

Think again: ECM platforms have Morse keys.


My operating position consisted entirely of receivers.   Not a transmitter or Morse key around.

Of course, I was a strategic asset, not a tactical weenie.
 
2013-08-12 11:53:00 AM

PandaPorn: karmaceutical: What the fark point was he trying to prove by jamming his employers GPS?

Maybe his boss was a member of the Tea Party and he wanted to show his lack of intelligence to impress him/her.


Maybe the boss voted for Obama and he wanted to show that he was stupider than the average Democrat voter.  Of course not counting the ones in Chicago who are dead.
 
2013-08-12 11:54:48 AM

cefm: I don't think he thought his clever plan through all the way.  If he knew that his company put a GPS tracker on the vehicle, and he actually thought they were paying attention to it, then he should also realize that they'd notice when his vehicle is the only one not reporting in.  That alone would be enough to be noticed.


24.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-08-12 11:55:04 AM
Only terrorists will have GPS jammers.
 
2013-08-12 11:56:07 AM

Snort: Only terrorists will have GPS jammers.



Do the military GPS fuzzers count?
 
2013-08-12 11:56:38 AM
www.caribjournal.com

Approves.
 
2013-08-12 12:00:03 PM

dittybopper: Actually, no, they don't.

Maximum slant range for a Stinger is around 15,000 feet.  At a 45 degree angle, that's a maximum height of around 10,000 feet.  And because balloons tend to be roughly the same temperature as the air surrounding them, seems to me it would be pretty difficult to get a lock on one with an infrared seeker.

Now, it would be relatively easy to target them using an anti-radiation missile, but then you're chasing $200 worth of stuff with a million dollar missile.  I'm willing to bet even the most cash-strapped insurgents could put up more jammers (if they deemed it necessary) then the US could send missiles.


Don't worry, there's a more traditional App for it:

www.navweaps.com


And for the people worried this will could take down planes.  No.  This system is to help separate traffic flows and optimize approaches so that traffic can be handled more smoothly than traditional measures.  There are however still plenty of tools in the bag that keep bad things from happening, like the TCAS system to keep birds from going bump in the night and radar altimeters barometric altimeters, INS, ILS, VORs & NDBs to keep them on course with positive altitude.  Pilots have been aviating long before GPS and will keep on doing so if it fails.  This reminds me of the people that thought planes were going to start falling out of the skies on Y2K, as if Bernoulli's Principle had an expiration date...
 
2013-08-12 12:04:04 PM

Click Click D'oh: Don't worry, there's a more traditional App for it:


Still gonna have a major problem.  How much AA artillery you know of that can go over 30,000 feet?  Balloons can easily do twice, and perhaps 3 times that much.
 
2013-08-12 12:05:29 PM
I have two  reallysmart friends who lost jobs for calling in sick, not taking into account the GPS on their work issued phones.
 
2013-08-12 12:06:33 PM

Click Click D'oh: This reminds me of the people that thought planes were going to start falling out of the skies on Y2K, as if Bernoulli's Principle had an expiration date...


Considering what happens when you take an F-22 across the international date line, it wasn't entirely unreasonable to suggest that a Y2K date rollover might have caused serious problems in fly-by-wire airplanes.
 
2013-08-12 12:09:30 PM

dittybopper: Still gonna have a major problem.  How much AA artillery you know of that can go over 30,000 feet?  Balloons can easily do twice, and perhaps 3 times that much.


www.wallpuper.com


Of course, once you get your home made JDAM jammer up to 30K feet, you may have some issues keeping it close enough to your target area to be effective.  A good upper level wind is probably going to blow it quite a bit down range no matter how well you tether it.
 
2013-08-12 12:11:47 PM
If you have a phone capable of GPS then you can probably be tracked for all intents and purposes.  Kinda scary if you really think about it.
 
2013-08-12 12:15:36 PM

Ivo Shandor: Considering what happens when you take an F-22 across the international date line, it wasn't entirely unreasonable to suggest that a Y2K date rollover might have caused serious problems in fly-by-wire airplanes.


So, what you really meant to say is that even with all their complex computer systems crippled, they were still able to fly for several hours and safety return to base? .... So, um....  Physics still works in the absence of computers?
 
2013-08-12 12:20:43 PM
So I suppose this is information that can be safely leaked to terrorists?
 
2013-08-12 12:22:53 PM

Thingster: I drove deliveries for a big chain auto supply house and they started doing the GPS tracking, but they were small handheld units (to be on your person the whole time you were driving/delivering).

They started writing people up for things like stopping at the quickmart for a soda or diverging from the designated route (even if you could prove it was to avoid traffic or an accident).

Magically my unit quit working. The uptime counter showed it'd been on the whole time, just for *some* reason it'd lose signal about 5 min out, and regain about 5 min before I got back.

It might have had something to do with the steel ammo can I started keeping in my backpack. I just wanted to make sure the company property didn't get damaged and all.



See, that's just BS.  You're supposed to save that for obviouly awful employees that you're looking for an excuse to fire (taking hours on end, mechanics complaining that they were stoned, etc.)
 
2013-08-12 12:26:16 PM

dittybopper: My operating position consisted entirely of receivers.   Not a transmitter or Morse key around.

Of course, I was a strategic asset, not a tactical weenie.


Everybody is a tactical weenie, as many hogs, duffies, coffee-fetchers, and golfs were distressed to discover during Desert Shield et seq..
 
2013-08-12 12:27:50 PM

Click Click D'oh: dittybopper: Still gonna have a major problem.  How much AA artillery you know of that can go over 30,000 feet?  Balloons can easily do twice, and perhaps 3 times that much.


img.fark.net 

If only that craft could do something about a location which was launching weather balloons.
 
2013-08-12 12:28:17 PM
Something tells me that he wanted the jammer for his funtimes with the lot-lizards.
 
2013-08-12 12:28:31 PM
Q: How'd they find this guy driving by the airport in his truck?

A: He wasn't driving, most likely. My guess is that the reason he wanted the jammer was so he could   park at the titty bar near the airport (because there are always nudie bars near the airport) and have a few hours of fun time without his boss knowing about it. So while he was inside tossing back a few drinks and getting a few lap dances, the feds were able to easily pinpoint his parked truck's jammer signal.

I hope those titties were worth $30k, dumbass.
 
2013-08-12 12:29:12 PM
No reasonable employee wants their boss to know where they are all the time.
Just as no reasonable boss wants his employees to know where she is all the time.


Now more than ever, we need a standard singular gender-neutral pronoun.
 
2013-08-12 12:29:35 PM

BafflerMeal: Snort: Only terrorists will have GPS jammers.


Do the military GPS fuzzers count?


The military are saints and immune from criticism.
 
2013-08-12 12:33:34 PM

deevo: No reasonable employee wants their boss to know where they are all the time.
Just as no reasonable boss wants his employees to know where she is all the time.

Now more than ever, we need a standard singular gender-neutral pronoun.


People have tried and failed before. Now, they just substitute the plural.
The day that pronouns lose case will be a very sad one.
/"He saw her and I together." and the like should be grounds for summary execution.
 
2013-08-12 12:35:41 PM

WelldeadLink: If only that craft could do something about a location which was launching weather balloons.


I was told there was a suspected weather balloon in this building.
 
2013-08-12 12:40:41 PM
$100.00 GPS jammer can disable the multi-million dollar GPS system at an airport...instead of a $30k fine the trucker should have gotten a reward for discovering a major flaw during the systems testing...reading on..."Though the Smartpath system was only being tested at the time Bojczak was intercepted, it has now been installed at Newark(International Airport)."...and will probably end up at other airports and then require multi-million dollar fixes.
/that's our business model
The idea of attaching one to a balloon...clever thinking citizen...now Vhere do you live and Vhere are you papers
 
2013-08-12 12:44:47 PM
I always thought a more fun hack would be to pollute the locations DB for a major city by hacking the source.  GPS would then work fine, but everyone who was going anywhere using GPS in that city would then find themselves at a traffic jam in the 7-ll parking lot.

/update locations set loc = 'this';
 
2013-08-12 12:51:29 PM
I might consider it a public service if I was on the way to New Jersey, and someone caused my plane to crash, killing all on board.

Not so much if I was on my way to anywhere else,  though.
 
2013-08-12 01:11:41 PM

Matthew Keene: PaLarkin: One exception would be microwave ovens.

img.fark.net

I said "Any system that relies on RF energy for communications can be interfered with " but you are correct that a microwave oven can be turned into a weapon.
 
2013-08-12 01:12:51 PM

mike_d85: Thingster: I drove deliveries for a big chain auto supply house and they started doing the GPS tracking, but they were small handheld units (to be on your person the whole time you were driving/delivering).

They started writing people up for things like stopping at the quickmart for a soda or diverging from the designated route (even if you could prove it was to avoid traffic or an accident).

Magically my unit quit working. The uptime counter showed it'd been on the whole time, just for *some* reason it'd lose signal about 5 min out, and regain about 5 min before I got back.

It might have had something to do with the steel ammo can I started keeping in my backpack. I just wanted to make sure the company property didn't get damaged and all.


See, that's just BS.  You're supposed to save that for obviouly awful employees that you're looking for an excuse to fire (taking hours on end, mechanics complaining that they were stoned, etc.)


Oh, I know, but when you have an assistant manager that thinks every little thing that goes wrong is a CATASTROPHE and toss in a napolean complex, things get micromanagey fast.

Fortunately that was my job while I find a job after I graduated.
 
2013-08-12 01:16:51 PM

Fubini: think the idea above was that you could use a phased array to make a jam-resistant GPS reciever. It would be... impractical, to say the least. Impossible maybe. The GPS signal is just SO weak. It's the weakest signal expressed on Wikipedia's dBm chart.

You would need incredibly precise antennas and directioning.


Fubini: If you're talking directional antenna, you're talking at least 3, but probably as many as 7-8 to get a good GPS lock. At this point, your military GPS system weighs as much as a car... not terribly practical for a device designed to help you navigate.


Novatel GJATTM GPS Anti-Jam Technology
GAJT's proprietary technology uses a concept similar to that of noise-cancelling headphones; it nullifies the jammers that are trying to overpower the satellite signals that GPS positioning systems use to compute location. GAJT defeats jamming thanks to antenna elements that create up to six independent nulls in the direction of the jammers.

www.novatel.com


There is lots of anti-jamming tech: https://www.google.com/search?q=GPS+anti-jamming
The handheld AN/PSN-13 Defense Advanced GPS Receiver  is supposed to be somewhat jam resistant, and its Applications Menu contains the entry "JAMMER FINDER"

I don't know how much of that tech is classified or released for civilian use, or whether civilian products should be designed for a hostile environment.
 
2013-08-12 01:21:06 PM
On the plus side he no longer has to worry about his boss tracking him.
 
2013-08-12 01:23:27 PM

Satyagraha: $100.00 GPS jammer can disable the multi-million dollar GPS system at an airport...instead of a $30k fine the trucker should have gotten a reward for discovering a major flaw during the systems testing...reading on..."Though the Smartpath system was only being tested at the time Bojczak was intercepted, it has now been installed at Newark(International Airport)."...and will probably end up at other airports and then require multi-million dollar fixes.
/that's our business model
The idea of attaching one to a balloon...clever thinking citizen...now Vhere do you live and Vhere are you papers


See also: Pressure cooker bombs at a race, subway, or the UN.  Numerous chemicals in your city's water supply.  A couple guys with boxcutters on an airplane.  A suicide bomber anywhere.  IEDs in general, also anywhere.

It doesn't take much to put a monkey wrench into the machinery of civilization.
 
2013-08-12 01:35:48 PM
Those cheap Chinese ones they sell on ebay are pieces of crap. Better go for the professional model.
images.defensetech.org
img.gawkerassets.com
 
2013-08-12 01:35:54 PM

Persnickety: Satyagraha: $100.00 GPS jammer can disable the multi-million dollar GPS system at an airport...instead of a $30k fine the trucker should have gotten a reward for discovering a major flaw during the systems testing...reading on..."Though the Smartpath system was only being tested at the time Bojczak was intercepted, it has now been installed at Newark(International Airport)."...and will probably end up at other airports and then require multi-million dollar fixes.
/that's our business model
The idea of attaching one to a balloon...clever thinking citizen...now Vhere do you live and Vhere are you papers

See also: Pressure cooker bombs at a race, subway, or the UN.  Numerous chemicals in your city's water supply.  A couple guys with boxcutters on an airplane.  A suicide bomber anywhere.  IEDs in general, also anywhere.

It doesn't take much to put a monkey wrench into the machinery of civilization.



crowbar, meet train track.
 
2013-08-12 01:38:00 PM

ZeroCorpse: I hope those titties were worth $30k, dumbass.


Some are, yes.
 
2013-08-12 01:41:33 PM

JonPace: Snarfangel: So Bojczak was fined $31,875 on Friday. And, yes, he was also fired for his misdirection.

Putting a GPS jammer in a company vehicle? Yeah, that sounds like grounds for automatic firing. If you don't want your employer to track you, drive your own truck.

On the other hand, an airport charged with landing airplanes worth hundreds of millions of dollars would seem to warrant having a system that can't be blocked with a $100 jammer.

That should be the real story here, and I wish they went more in depth on how much trouble it actually caused them. Were people at risk? Could you plant a few of those around the airport and get planes to run into each other? Seems insane how much we pay for airport security just to be able to shut the whole thing down for under $100


So here's an idea: the turrists drop cheap jammers into the bushes near as many airports as possible on the same day. Instant chaos for a few thousand bucks with very little risk?

One wonders why they are obsessed with doing stuff that is dangerous and/or suicidal when there seem to be so many alternatives. It's scary, really. One day some evil genius will make like really difficult for us, I'm sure.
 
2013-08-12 01:44:03 PM
Fantastic. The best value to get to NYC from Toronto is through Newark. Let's just hope that they have improved the performance of the system to be able to work through $100 jammers, or that $30,000 fine won't begin to cover the lawsuits now that the Streisand effect is in play.
 
2013-08-12 01:49:19 PM

Click Click D'oh: dittybopper: Actually, no, they don't.

Maximum slant range for a Stinger is around 15,000 feet.  At a 45 degree angle, that's a maximum height of around 10,000 feet.  And because balloons tend to be roughly the same temperature as the air surrounding them, seems to me it would be pretty difficult to get a lock on one with an infrared seeker.

Now, it would be relatively easy to target them using an anti-radiation missile, but then you're chasing $200 worth of stuff with a million dollar missile.  I'm willing to bet even the most cash-strapped insurgents could put up more jammers (if they deemed it necessary) then the US could send missiles.

Don't worry, there's a more traditional App for it:

[www.navweaps.com image 707x522]


I have a lamp made of a AAA shell like that in the photo my dad made in WW2 when in Sicily.
The base is Italian Marble and has a ash tray molded on the top.
 
2013-08-12 01:50:14 PM

Jument: JonPace: Snarfangel: So Bojczak was fined $31,875 on Friday. And, yes, he was also fired for his misdirection.

Putting a GPS jammer in a company vehicle? Yeah, that sounds like grounds for automatic firing. If you don't want your employer to track you, drive your own truck.

On the other hand, an airport charged with landing airplanes worth hundreds of millions of dollars would seem to warrant having a system that can't be blocked with a $100 jammer.

That should be the real story here, and I wish they went more in depth on how much trouble it actually caused them. Were people at risk? Could you plant a few of those around the airport and get planes to run into each other? Seems insane how much we pay for airport security just to be able to shut the whole thing down for under $100

So here's an idea: the turrists drop cheap jammers into the bushes near as many airports as possible on the same day. Instant chaos for a few thousand bucks with very little risk?

One wonders why they are obsessed with doing stuff that is dangerous and/or suicidal when there seem to be so many alternatives. It's scary, really. One day some evil genius will make like really difficult for us, I'm sure.


Because no one is going to be terrorized by airport chaos.
 
2013-08-12 01:58:11 PM

stevetherobot: Jument: JonPace: Snarfangel: So Bojczak was fined $31,875 on Friday. And, yes, he was also fired for his misdirection.

Putting a GPS jammer in a company vehicle? Yeah, that sounds like grounds for automatic firing. If you don't want your employer to track you, drive your own truck.

On the other hand, an airport charged with landing airplanes worth hundreds of millions of dollars would seem to warrant having a system that can't be blocked with a $100 jammer.

That should be the real story here, and I wish they went more in depth on how much trouble it actually caused them. Were people at risk? Could you plant a few of those around the airport and get planes to run into each other? Seems insane how much we pay for airport security just to be able to shut the whole thing down for under $100

So here's an idea: the turrists drop cheap jammers into the bushes near as many airports as possible on the same day. Instant chaos for a few thousand bucks with very little risk?

One wonders why they are obsessed with doing stuff that is dangerous and/or suicidal when there seem to be so many alternatives. It's scary, really. One day some evil genius will make like really difficult for us, I'm sure.

Because no one is going to be terrorized by airport chaos.


I don't know about that...see Boston a couple of years ago, where people were shiatting purple bricks over some Lite-Brite displays...
 
2013-08-12 02:02:20 PM

chevydeuce: stevetherobot: Jument: JonPace: Snarfangel: So Bojczak was fined $31,875 on Friday. And, yes, he was also fired for his misdirection.

Putting a GPS jammer in a company vehicle? Yeah, that sounds like grounds for automatic firing. If you don't want your employer to track you, drive your own truck.

On the other hand, an airport charged with landing airplanes worth hundreds of millions of dollars would seem to warrant having a system that can't be blocked with a $100 jammer.

That should be the real story here, and I wish they went more in depth on how much trouble it actually caused them. Were people at risk? Could you plant a few of those around the airport and get planes to run into each other? Seems insane how much we pay for airport security just to be able to shut the whole thing down for under $100

So here's an idea: the turrists drop cheap jammers into the bushes near as many airports as possible on the same day. Instant chaos for a few thousand bucks with very little risk?

One wonders why they are obsessed with doing stuff that is dangerous and/or suicidal when there seem to be so many alternatives. It's scary, really. One day some evil genius will make like really difficult for us, I'm sure.

Because no one is going to be terrorized by airport chaos.

I don't know about that...see Boston a couple of years ago, where people were shiatting purple bricks over some Lite-Brite displays...


Suppose suddenly every airport is trying to direct incoming flights to other airports, which are all doing the same. That could end up badly. There are a lot of planes in the air at any given moment and they all have limited fuel.
 
2013-08-12 02:08:10 PM

Jument: So here's an idea: the turrists drop cheap jammers into the bushes near as many airports as possible on the same day. Instant chaos for a few thousand bucks with very little risk?


Other than making some mid level cog crap his pants, it won't really effect much.  1) The important GPS systems are the ones on the airplanes, which won't be effected by a jammer located at the airport until the last minute or so of approach.  By that time they should already be well established on the localizer and guideslope, which are not GPS dependant.  And if that fails, there's always the old eyeballs out the window technique:

www.aroundthepattern.com

See the two lights on the left of the runawy?  Those are the PAPI lights.  It's an approach tool.  If you get more red than white, you are too low.  More white than red means you are too high.  Half and half means you are right where you need to be.  If you get to DH on the RA and you don't have the runway in sight to finish the landing visual, you go around.

The only way losing GPS causes havoc is if all the rules get forgotten... or Asiana pilots are flying.
 
2013-08-12 02:14:23 PM
the foil works
my step son put in a satellite stereo system and i messed with him by just putting my hand over the antenna
every time i leaned in to hear his stereo i would hear about 2 seconds of sound and then nothing. it took him quite a while to figure out why it did not work when i was there.
we used foil on my buddy's truck and his phone would ring because his boss said his truck went off the computer screen, he told him it was really cloudy
always know enough to cause trouble and not get caught
 
2013-08-12 02:16:21 PM

Jument: Suppose suddenly every airport is trying to direct incoming flights to other airports, which are all doing the same. T


They won't be.  Aiports with a functional ILS will just don RNAV Precision Approaches and airports without one will be doing RNAV Non-Precision Approaches.
 
2013-08-12 02:24:12 PM

JonPace: Snarfangel: So Bojczak was fined $31,875 on Friday. And, yes, he was also fired for his misdirection.

Putting a GPS jammer in a company vehicle? Yeah, that sounds like grounds for automatic firing. If you don't want your employer to track you, drive your own truck.

On the other hand, an airport charged with landing airplanes worth hundreds of millions of dollars would seem to warrant having a system that can't be blocked with a $100 jammer.

That should be the real story here, and I wish they went more in depth on how much trouble it actually caused them. Were people at risk? Could you plant a few of those around the airport and get planes to run into each other? Seems insane how much we pay for airport security just to be able to shut the whole thing down for under $100


In point of fact, you can do it for a lot less than 100$.  Quick lesson, just the basics.  GPS works by reading the signal from two or more satellites, the signal is just a time stream, a very accurate time stream.  You then compare the two and based on how much variation there is, you know where you are.  (it's more complicated than that, but not a lot more)

Aircraft GPS generally require at least 3 satellites, for a fix.

You can "jam" the signal by simply sending white noise on the same channel the GPS uses.  Or you can get really nasty and REPLACE the GPS signal with your own time stream, altered to your chosen spec.  The amount of mayhem you could cause at an airport is pretty high.  But lets be clear, GPS isn't used for landing or takeoff.  (expect maybe in newark)  The landing systems (ILS) use a totally different system and are JUST as easy to fark with.

I can build a GPS "jammer" from parts in about an hour and the cost should be roughly 30$.  (cost of a GPS band Transceiver)  However, I'm almost certain that you can't even legally acquire a GPS band transmitter of any kind in this country without FCC permits.
 
2013-08-12 03:09:20 PM

Jument: JonPace: Snarfangel: So Bojczak was fined $31,875 on Friday. And, yes, he was also fired for his misdirection.

Putting a GPS jammer in a company vehicle? Yeah, that sounds like grounds for automatic firing. If you don't want your employer to track you, drive your own truck.

On the other hand, an airport charged with landing airplanes worth hundreds of millions of dollars would seem to warrant having a system that can't be blocked with a $100 jammer.

That should be the real story here, and I wish they went more in depth on how much trouble it actually caused them. Were people at risk? Could you plant a few of those around the airport and get planes to run into each other? Seems insane how much we pay for airport security just to be able to shut the whole thing down for under $100

So here's an idea: the turrists drop cheap jammers into the bushes near as many airports as possible on the same day. Instant chaos for a few thousand bucks with very little risk?

One wonders why they are obsessed with doing stuff that is dangerous and/or suicidal when there seem to be so many alternatives. It's scary, really. One day some evil genius will make like really difficult for us, I'm sure.


Eh, Goldman Sachs will just put him on their bonus plan, like all the others before him...
 
2013-08-12 03:23:48 PM

HAMMERTOE: You mean, Die Hard II could actually happen?


As shown by Asianic, the pilots don't bother looking out their windshields to look for the ground.
 
2013-08-12 03:27:52 PM

dittybopper: durbnpoisn: Snarfangel: So Bojczak was fined $31,875 on Friday. And, yes, he was also fired for his misdirection.

Putting a GPS jammer in a company vehicle? Yeah, that sounds like grounds for automatic firing. If you don't want your employer to track you, drive your own truck.


Well, even then, you still have to be accountable for your wherabouts.  If for no other reason that you will presumably be charging by the mile for the usage of your vehicle.
Still, this seems like an excessive fine.  It's not like this guy did anything intentional to disrupt the airport.

I must say, though...  It's impressive that that jammer has such a range that it extended as far as the control tower.  We're talking hundreds of yards from the TP.  And what I REALLY want to know is, if he was jamming everything, how the hell did they figure out that it was HIM doing it.  He must have been driving at 75mph, and was probably only in the vicinity for a minute or so.

//Lando:  How can they be jaming us if they don't know that...  That we're coming?  Break off the attack!  All craft pull up!!

If you radiate, they can find you.  And if you radiate constantly, really all they have to do to figure out who it is that is causing the temporary outages is to put a receiver keyed up to a video camera that records who is going by.  Have it store images from the very peak of the interference.

Then, all you have to do is look for the one vehicle that shows up in most or all of the images.

Either that, or just use basic radio direction finding techniques like those used by military intelligence, the FCC, and ham radio operators.  It's easy enough to do that I had some 8, 9 and 10 year old kids finding a hidden transmitter with a simple hand-held antenna from half a mile away.


We used to play hide-n-seek with cbs.
 
2013-08-12 03:36:58 PM

Persnickety: Numerous chemicals in your city's water supply.


i745.photobucket.com
 
2013-08-12 03:48:36 PM
CSB time...

In 1994 I personally got to play with one of the Army's first GPS units.

It sucked, was huge and heavy (compared to today's stuff), and was off by a good 30-90 feet when we used it. But for the time, it was mind blowingly awesome.

I can't remember exactly (as this was almost 20 years ago now), but I think this was the model we used:
usarmy.vo.llnwd.net
 
2013-08-12 08:52:18 PM

China White Tea: Get some guys with directional antennae and follow the signal?


2-3 antennas and you can located him to within a couple meters with some triangulation.  No need for 'following'.  Given that he's blocking GPS they likely had to break out the map and go 'he's here', but that's about it.

StoPPeRmobile: They should ban it. That way no one will do it.


It doesn't stop everyone, but it does stop loads of people, and the FCC is one agency that actually has a good number of teeth within it's domain.

HairBolus: Umm, a sophisticated system should determine the vectors to the jamming sources so that they can be cancelled out, meanwhile using inertial navigation and at worst crude approximations such as "up in the sky" for the good sources. Think of GPS as a way to calibrate inertial navigation systems.


I'll note that with the US Military, one of the 'cancel out' options is the high explosive warhead of a HARM missile.  And not all of them cost $1M.  Heck, only the latest AGM-88E costs $870k.
 
2013-08-12 08:58:53 PM

demaL-demaL-yeH: strategic ass


I resemble that statement.

And I ETS'd before Desert Storm.
 
2013-08-12 09:08:52 PM

Satyagraha: The idea of attaching one to a balloon...clever thinking citizen


Yeah, I'm funny that way.

Actually, GPS makes balloon-born attacks like the Japaneses tried to do in WWII possible:  You program in the boundaries of all the cities you want to attack, and release the balloon.  When it end up over one of those cities, drop the payload.

Payload doesn't even have to be explosive, really:  From a high enough altitude (like above 60,000 feet), something like a steel rod with one end tapered and small metal fins on the other will do a lot of damage when it hits something, especially if it's gone supersonic, which it should do easily.  Drop a bunch of them sequentially, and well, there you go.  You're bound to hit something.

The other alternative is to make an autonomous GPS guided glider that has some sort of payload.   They are easy enough to make, being essentially model airplanes, and you can put any kind of a payload you want on something like that:  explosive, incendiary, biological, chemical, radiological.

With a 10 to 1 glide ratio, and a release height of 60,000 feet, you'd get a range of over 100 miles in still air.
 
2013-08-12 09:25:04 PM

HairBolus: The handheld AN/PSN-13 Defense Advanced GPS Receiver  is supposed to be somewhat jam resistant, and its Applications Menu contains the entry "JAMMER FINDER"


Which kind of brings up an important thing that this fellow didn't realize:  Don't be co-located with the jammer.
 
2013-08-12 09:51:58 PM

Snarfangel: On the other hand, an airport charged with landing airplanes worth hundreds of millions of dollars would seem to warrant having a system that can't be blocked with a $100 jammer.


Regular folks could jam any of the other navigation aids as well - they're  not protected. It's only because GPS is widely used and some douche builds a jammer and some bigger douche would actually use it that we now have a problem.

Perhaps we shouldn't have let mere citizens uses GPS and retained it solely for the military.
 
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