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(Guardian)   Fracking has been so good to Texas that they're running out of fresh drinking water   (theguardian.com) divider line 217
    More: Scary, Texas, drinking water, water well, Texas Panhandle, shale gas, RV park  
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4413 clicks; posted to Business » on 12 Aug 2013 at 10:45 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



217 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-08-12 10:11:41 AM
These towns should switch to Brawndo from water. It's got electrolytes.
 
2013-08-12 10:17:18 AM
Please post "good" grumpy cat.
 
2013-08-12 10:41:57 AM
This could get ugly.

Georgia, Florida and Alabama are already scrapping over water rights.  What the hell will Texas do when the Ogallala aquifer dries up?
 
2013-08-12 10:49:37 AM
As soon as I got to the part where someone was named Buck Owens, I wasn't able to concentrate on the article any longer.

C'mon Fark, someone photoshop a pic of old Buck into an oil field...
 
2013-08-12 10:59:11 AM
If they want water, they could always buy some from this guy. Only a damn socialist would expect it to come up from the ground for free.
 
2013-08-12 11:03:03 AM
Yep, welcome to capitalism dumb ass, where the person with the most money gets to decided how limited resources are used. Paraphrasing the words of the immortal Sam Kinnison "YOU LIVE IN A farkING DESERT! MOVE TO WHERE THE WATER IS ASSHOLE!"
 
2013-08-12 11:14:33 AM
"I went: 'dear God help us. That was the first thought that came to mind."

"I gave you people water.  You traded it for money."  -God
 
2013-08-12 11:15:43 AM
A vast majority of the items they listed are due to the extreme drought conditions. Much of the water being used in fracking operations is being trucked in, stored in large about ground ponds and is being reclaimed and recycled.
 
2013-08-12 11:22:19 AM
Fracking, yes.  I am sure the worst drought in decades has nothing to do with it.   Water issues are turning up more and more.  Here in SW Texas, we have been under water restrictions forever and States are fighting each other in court over it (TX vs OK, FL vs GA, AL).   What is this going to be like in 30-35 years when the U.S. population has doubled again. What about the rest of the world?  What about in 70 years when the population has quadrupled?
 
2013-08-12 11:26:49 AM
Not to worry, Guv Goodhair is on it!

i90.photobucket.com
 
2013-08-12 11:27:43 AM
Wait, you mean to tell me drought conditions, overuse by farming/ranching, and now looking to sell your well water for a quick buck to frackers leads to a resource shortage? HOLY SHIAT, WHY DID NOBODY EVER TELL US?!

img84.imageshack.us
"They bought their tickets, they knew what they were getting into. I say, let 'em crash."
 
2013-08-12 11:27:46 AM

Dancin_In_Anson: A vast majority of the items they listed are due to the extreme drought conditions. Much of the water being used in fracking operations is being trucked in, stored in large about ground ponds and is being reclaimed and recycled.


...Ah yes, water needs to be trucked in....because the local access to water has been sucked dry, which also includes the drought conditions. But the thing is that Texas is, for all practical purpose, continually in a drought condition when it comes to having enough water to sustain the people and agriculture that is within it's borders.
 
2013-08-12 11:32:34 AM
As long as the jerb creators get theirs, that's all that matters.

What's the matter with Kansas Texas?
 
2013-08-12 11:33:05 AM

Pumpernickel bread: Here in SW Texas


Where ya at?

snowshovel: Ah yes, water needs to be trucked in....because the local access to water has been sucked dry, which also includes i s primarily due to the drought conditions.


FTFY
 
2013-08-12 11:34:17 AM

snowshovel: Dancin_In_Anson: A vast majority of the items they listed are due to the extreme drought conditions. Much of the water being used in fracking operations is being trucked in, stored in large about ground ponds and is being reclaimed and recycled.

...Ah yes, water needs to be trucked in....because the local access to water has been sucked dry, which also includes the drought conditions. But the thing is that Texas is, for all practical purpose, continually in a drought condition when it comes to having enough water to sustain the people and agriculture that is within it's borders.


They should totally secede!

/bright bulbs down in Texas
 
2013-08-12 11:34:18 AM

yeegrek: As long as the jerb creators get theirs, that's all that matters.


You might want to look at the unemployment figures in West Texas. If you're not employed it's because you don't want to be.
 
2013-08-12 11:36:59 AM

Pumpernickel bread: Fracking, yes.  I am sure the worst drought in decades has nothing to do with it.   Water issues are turning up more and more.  Here in SW Texas, we have been under water restrictions forever and States are fighting each other in court over it (TX vs OK, FL vs GA, AL).   What is this going to be like in 30-35 years when the U.S. population has doubled again. What about the rest of the world?  What about in 70 years when the population has quadrupled?


Well I imagine the Great Lakes and Mississippi river valley will experience a population surge as people are forced to move to where the fresh water is. Alternatively desalination plants will be profitable enough for business to invest in, because until the Repulitard "starve the beast" mentality that infects 45% of the voting public dies the US government won't be investing in infrastructure that could improve the daily lives of millions of Americans.
 
2013-08-12 11:41:06 AM
I read that headline as 'Farking has been so good to Texas'. I shuddered to think what was in their water.
 
2013-08-12 11:43:53 AM
I'm not sure if fracking is the reason, but all of the grocery and big box stores in my major metropolitan area in Texas have been seriously downsizing or "phasing out" the shelf space for gallon jugs of spring water, so there's usually nothing left but "drinking" (aka tap water) and "distilled" water.

/Scary
 
2013-08-12 11:44:13 AM
Hah! Illinois is running out of Fresh Water WITHOUT Fracking!

We WIN!
 
2013-08-12 11:45:45 AM
I live in Wisconsin. I'm not sharing my water with dumbasses who choose to use it for fracking rather than drinking. Time to set up a perimeter with razor wire and gun turrets.
 
2013-08-12 11:46:01 AM

Pumpernickel bread: Fracking, yes.  I am sure the worst drought in decades has nothing to do with it.   Water issues are turning up more and more.  Here in SW Texas, we have been under water restrictions forever and States are fighting each other in court over it (TX vs OK, FL vs GA, AL).   What is this going to be like in 30-35 years when the U.S. population has doubled again. What about the rest of the world?  What about in 70 years when the population has quadrupled?


TFA's implication is that the recent rapid increase in fracking as a means of oil extraction is drastically increasing the water demand.  Even without the factors you mentioned, that seems like a agricultural disaster in the making.
 
2013-08-12 11:51:47 AM
It's not news, it's Frak.com.

wait a minute...
 
2013-08-12 11:53:14 AM

simplicimus: These towns should switch to Brawndo from water. It's got electrolytes.


Brawndo is, after all, what plants crave.
 
2013-08-12 11:58:00 AM
For all you texas morans who supported fracking because "derp, god, oil, guns, yeeehaaaw"

funnycatwallpapers.com
 
2013-08-12 11:58:47 AM

Marcus Aurelius: This could get ugly.

Georgia, Florida and Alabama are already scrapping over water rights.  What the hell will Texas do when the Ogallala aquifer dries up?


When the Edwards runs out of water, San Antonio will dry up and blow away.
 
2013-08-12 11:59:14 AM

Rapmaster2000: "I went: 'dear God help us. That was the first thought that came to mind."

"I gave you people water.  You traded it for money."  -God


hopestillfloats.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-08-12 11:59:49 AM

yanoosh: I live in Wisconsin. I'm not sharing my water with dumbasses who choose to use it for fracking rather than drinking. Time to set up a perimeter with razor wire and gun turrets.


It would be much cheaper to put in a desal plant on the coast and pipe it to inland TX rather than pump and pipe it from Wisconson.  Don't be paranoid.  No one from Texas or the Western US is going to be taking your water anytime soon.
 
2013-08-12 12:02:22 PM

SpectroBoy: For all you texas morans who supported fracking because "derp, god, oil, guns, yeeehaaaw"

[funnycatwallpapers.com image 400x400]


Not sure what fracking has to do with god or guns.  Oil I can see, but the rest of looks to be just a derpy strawman.
 
2013-08-12 12:04:01 PM

Rapmaster2000: "I gave you people water. You traded it for money." -God


Water is never free.  You always trade it for money.  Look at your utility bill sometime.
 
2013-08-12 12:06:39 PM
Dear All you assholes who abandoned the midwest to move to the "more livable" cities of Dallas, Phoenix, Atlanta etc..

Now that you have overwhelmed and/or poisoned the aquifers done there please don't try to move back here where we have all these beautiful Great Lakes and fresh water. You made your bed and abandoned the "Rust Belt" so fark you.

Sincerely
NTE
 
2013-08-12 12:07:34 PM

Slaves2Darkness: Well I imagine the Great Lakes and Mississippi river valley will experience a population surge as people are forced to move to where the fresh water is.


There is talk of fracking in Michigan.  Image the joy when the Great Lakes are contaminated.
 
2013-08-12 12:09:56 PM

HeadLever: yanoosh: I live in Wisconsin. I'm not sharing my water with dumbasses who choose to use it for fracking rather than drinking. Time to set up a perimeter with razor wire and gun turrets.

It would be much cheaper to put in a desal plant on the coast and pipe it to inland TX rather than pump and pipe it from Wisconson.  Don't be paranoid.  No one from Texas or the Western US is going to be taking your water anytime soon.


If we can purify Gulf water, we can pretty much take care of the water problem in Texas. Might be a big "if" though.
 
2013-08-12 12:11:58 PM

Muta: Slaves2Darkness: Well I imagine the Great Lakes and Mississippi river valley will experience a population surge as people are forced to move to where the fresh water is.

There is talk of fracking in Michigan.  Image the joy when the Great Lakes are contaminated.


The Mississippi is far from potable water, but it can be treated.
 
2013-08-12 12:12:14 PM

NuttierThanEver: You made your bed and abandoned the "Rust Belt" so fark you.


So, stay away and let us wallow in our self-pity?  Don't forget that even you have your own water issues there in the beautiful Great Lakes, even after being 'abondoned'.
 
2013-08-12 12:12:26 PM

Pumpernickel bread: Fracking, yes. I am sure the worst drought in decades has nothing to do with it.


You know they use gobs of water for fracking, yeah? It's called hydrofracking for a reason.
 
2013-08-12 12:14:04 PM
But, but, but ... the drilling companies are exempt from the Clean Air and Water acts!
They'll act in our best interests, right?
Right?
RIGHT?

crickets.

Oil field trash destroying the planet, one well at a time.
 
2013-08-12 12:14:24 PM

HeadLever: yanoosh: I live in Wisconsin. I'm not sharing my water with dumbasses who choose to use it for fracking rather than drinking. Time to set up a perimeter with razor wire and gun turrets.

It would be much cheaper to put in a desal plant on the coast and pipe it to inland TX rather than pump and pipe it from Wisconson.  Don't be paranoid.  No one from Texas or the Western US is going to be taking your water anytime soon.


Ok I feel much better now as I put the safety back on.
 
2013-08-12 12:16:59 PM

HeadLever: Rapmaster2000: "I gave you people water. You traded it for money." -God

Water is never free.  You always trade it for money.  Look at your utility bill sometime.


Thanks, Einstein.
 
2013-08-12 12:17:42 PM

yanoosh: HeadLever: yanoosh: I live in Wisconsin. I'm not sharing my water with dumbasses who choose to use it for fracking rather than drinking. Time to set up a perimeter with razor wire and gun turrets.

It would be much cheaper to put in a desal plant on the coast and pipe it to inland TX rather than pump and pipe it from Wisconson.  Don't be paranoid.  No one from Texas or the Western US is going to be taking your water anytime soon.

Ok I feel much better now as I put the safety back on.


Imagine how those crazy armed militia groups out in the woods would react to a big ol' pipe sending the great lakes' water down south.  It'd be like the Troubles but with hotdish.
 
2013-08-12 12:19:37 PM

HeadLever: Not sure what fracking has to do with god or guns. Oil I can see, but the rest of looks to be just a derpy strawman.


Forget it, he's rolling.
 
2013-08-12 12:19:45 PM

simplicimus: If we can purify Gulf water, we can pretty much take care of the water problem in Texas. Might be a big "if" though.


The 'if' is for certain.  Of course you can treat it to drinking water standards.  The issue is whether you can do it cheaply enough to complete with other existing sources.  When Desalination and pumping from the coast becomes cheaper than drilling deeper wells and transferring water rights, then you will see it start to happen.  It is already happening in California.

Another big issue that will go a long ways to 'fix' the current shortage will be to go to direct reuse.
 
2013-08-12 12:22:59 PM

PC LOAD LETTER: Pumpernickel bread: Fracking, yes. I am sure the worst drought in decades has nothing to do with it.

You know they use gobs of water for fracking, yeah? It's called hydrofracking for a reason.


And how much of it was drinkable vs recycled and/or nasty brine to begin with?
 
2013-08-12 12:24:07 PM

HotIgneous Intruder: the drilling companies are exempt from the Clean Air and Water acts!


No they are not.
 
2013-08-12 12:27:50 PM
If only someone could have warned them about the inevitable consequences of squandering a limited and precious resource.
 
2013-08-12 12:28:03 PM

HeadLever: simplicimus: If we can purify Gulf water, we can pretty much take care of the water problem in Texas. Might be a big "if" though.

The 'if' is for certain.  Of course you can treat it to drinking water standards.  The issue is whether you can do it cheaply enough to complete with other existing sources.  When Desalination and pumping from the coast becomes cheaper than drilling deeper wells and transferring water rights, then you will see it start to happen.  It is already happening in California.

Another big issue that will go a long ways to 'fix' the current shortage will be to go to direct reuse.


I think when there are no other available sources, pricing won't be much of an issue. Even though Texas has been in severe drought conditions for years, West Texas is pretty much desert or badlands anyway.
 
2013-08-12 12:29:23 PM

ShadowKamui: PC LOAD LETTER: Pumpernickel bread: Fracking, yes. I am sure the worst drought in decades has nothing to do with it.

You know they use gobs of water for fracking, yeah? It's called hydrofracking for a reason.

And how much of it was drinkable vs recycled and/or nasty brine to begin with?


Not much. A bountiful creator saw fit to add an abundance of Cesium to a good bit of it.
 
2013-08-12 12:30:40 PM
It turns out, Wizard & Glass happened/happens/will happen in Texas. The world has moved on.
 
2013-08-12 12:33:01 PM
Don't worry, the free market will have a solution.
 
2013-08-12 12:35:53 PM

simplicimus: I think when there are no other available sources, pricing won't be much of an issue. Even though Texas has been in severe drought conditions for years, West Texas is pretty much desert or badlands anyway.


Water is nothing more than any other economic commodity, although one that everyone needs.  any water source has a cost for bringing it to market, whether that is pumping it out of the ground to your house, pumping it and treating it from a river or lake for a city, or pumping it out of the ocean, treating it and pumping it inland for industrial use.

Typically pumping it out of the ground or a river/lake is cheaper because the piping cost and treatment cost are much lower.  When that source becomes inaccessible because of water rights issues or inavaliability, then you just have to go to the next cheapest option or pack up your bags and go find somewhere else to live.
 
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