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(Telegraph)   Plans for revolutionary hyperloop transportation system to be announced Monday by the guy Tony Stark was modeled on...if this guy was around when Stan Lee was merely 65 years old   (telegraph.co.uk) divider line 104
    More: Interesting, Iron Man, International Space Station, Sir Richard Branson, Elon Musk, transportation  
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4600 clicks; posted to Geek » on 11 Aug 2013 at 4:28 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



104 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-08-10 08:42:43 PM  
Wait, I can be sucked to my destination? Sure, tax me to death for that. I'm game.
 
2013-08-10 08:50:44 PM  
Hey, I found a video of that guy explaining the concept to investors:

Link
 
2013-08-10 08:56:30 PM  
And he's not patenting it. I wonder how many people will try to patent it in his place.
 
2013-08-10 09:01:20 PM  
Not a new idea: The idea of a subway, with vaccum and hypersonic speeds using a 'maglev' type system has been around quite a while.

img.trekmovie.com
From Gene Roddenberry's Planet Earth.


And also in song from Dan Fagen: IGY (Steely Dan)

On that train all graphite and glitter
Undersea by rail
Ninety Minutes from New York to Paris.
 
2013-08-10 09:02:45 PM  
Is Stan Lee the Highlander? With old age make-up to not arouse suspicion?
 
2013-08-10 09:03:54 PM  

flucto: Wait, I can be sucked to my destination? Sure, tax me to death for that. I'm game.


You sure? That's "sucked to" as opposed to "sucked off"
 
2013-08-10 09:11:37 PM  
FTFA:  The mercurial, fictional character of Tony Stark, played by Robert Downey Jr in the Iron Man films, is reputedly based on him.

Uhhh...who the f*ck wrote this??
 
2013-08-10 10:02:56 PM  
The Hyperloop is not a vacuum tube. Lets get that out of the way right away.
 
2013-08-10 10:05:37 PM  

Ambivalence: And he's not patenting it. I wonder how many people will try to patent it in his place.


Even though it is open source it will still be protected. It will be open to anyone. There will undoubtedly be several groups that work on it. Definitely one down in California. I am working on setting up a working group to implement it up here in Portland.
 
2013-08-10 10:10:27 PM  

dr_blasto: You sure? That's "sucked to" as opposed to "sucked off"


For my sad purposes it seems equivalent.
 
2013-08-10 10:16:11 PM  

optikeye: Not a new idea: The idea of a subway, with vaccum and hypersonic speeds using a 'maglev' type system has been around quite a while.


Linear motor will accelerate at the beginning (and decelerate at the end) but in the main tube it won't be maglev. Rather it will be suspended on a layer of air.
 
2013-08-10 10:44:08 PM  
FTFA: But the latest mysterious project, which has had the technology world buzzing for months, has one crucial difference. Its backer is a Silicon Valley wunderkind with a proven track record of turning science fiction into reality.

Billionaire Elon Musk's CV is impressive, to say the least. He made his initial fortune from PayPal, the online secure payment system, before going on to launch spaceships. Last year his SpaceX venture became the first private operation to dock a cargo capsule with the International Space Station.

Back on Earth, Mr Musk also founded Tesla, which has made electric sports cars viable and profitable.


While Mr. Musk's achievements have been many, none of them really qualify as "turning science fiction into reality." The author of TFA is apparently an Elon Musk fanboy.
 
2013-08-10 11:11:00 PM  
Wouldn't there be a way to do this more efficiently than with vacuum pressure?  I'm thinking of a system of tubes with electromagnetic rings at set intervals that moves the cars in a fashion to the way a gauss rifle moves a projectile would work out better.
 
2013-08-10 11:19:23 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: Wouldn't there be a way to do this more efficiently than with vacuum pressure?  I'm thinking of a system of tubes with electromagnetic rings at set intervals that moves the cars in a fashion to the way a gauss rifle moves a projectile would work out better.


It won't be a vacuum tube.  There will be a moving column of air, since there is less friction against the edge of a tube than against a moving car.  Relative speed of the car against the air will be low.
 
2013-08-11 12:06:48 AM  

Hollie Maea: optikeye: Not a new idea: The idea of a subway, with vaccum and hypersonic speeds using a 'maglev' type system has been around quite a while.

Linear motor will accelerate at the beginning (and decelerate at the end) but in the main tube it won't be maglev. Rather it will be suspended on a layer of air.


I hope they've taken into the account the end points of a hypersonic pneumatic tube system.

Because there could be quite a breeze at the station...and a shock wave.
 
2013-08-11 12:42:44 AM  

optikeye: Hollie Maea: optikeye: Not a new idea: The idea of a subway, with vaccum and hypersonic speeds using a 'maglev' type system has been around quite a while.

Linear motor will accelerate at the beginning (and decelerate at the end) but in the main tube it won't be maglev. Rather it will be suspended on a layer of air.

I hope they've taken into the account the end points of a hypersonic pneumatic tube system.

Because there could be quite a breeze at the station...and a shock wave.


yeah...there will need to be a shunting system to get out of the main tube. We'll find out for sure on Monday but of course Elon has taken that into account.
 
2013-08-11 01:39:13 AM  
isnt this yet another repeat?
FFS
 
2013-08-11 01:55:13 AM  

namatad: isnt this yet another repeat?
FFS


They want to give you plenty of opportunities to whine and complain.
 
2013-08-11 03:25:20 AM  
www.columbia.edu
Would like a word....
 
2013-08-11 04:46:14 AM  
The "cross between Concorde, a rail gun and an air hockey table" will deliver passengers between US cities faster than the speed of sound.

Mighty hopeful opening, considering that the US is allergic to public transport and can't even do regular train or light rail.

I read a thing about California's high speed rail project, which was somewhat disappointing. It is actually worse than taking the plane. I get a little sad when things are not getting better in the future.
Another example would be like the Concorde being retired and the fact there is no supersonic passenger transport. I think that is sad. You want the future to be better than the past, or at least I do.


Well, he's got a point there.
 
2013-08-11 04:48:44 AM  
Tony Stark is clearly modeled on Howard Hughes.
 
2013-08-11 04:58:08 AM  
Hollie Maea

Even though it is open source it will still be protected. It will be open to anyone. There will undoubtedly be several groups that work on it. Definitely one down in California. I am working on setting up a working group to implement it up here in Portland.

Bring it up to Seattle while you are at it, will have to bore tunnels thru mountains. Maybe that is another reason why they are doing southern CA first
 
2013-08-11 05:36:12 AM  
Is there a chance the track could bend?
 
2013-08-11 06:07:36 AM  

optikeye: Not a new idea: The idea of a subway, with vaccum and hypersonic speeds using a 'maglev' type system has been around quite a while.

[img.trekmovie.com image 800x597]
From Gene Roddenberry's Planet Earth.


And also in song from Dan Fagen: IGY (Steely Dan)

On that train all graphite and glitter
Undersea by rail
Ninety Minutes from New York to Paris.


Sci-fi authors don't count. Terry Pratchett's co-authored Long Earth stepper has a circuit that's powered by a potato. Even if we one day get a machine that can trasport you to another dimention with a potato for power, it's safe to say Sir Pratchett won't have been involved in the design at all.

Authors are the 1% inspiration.
 
2013-08-11 06:11:26 AM  

Flint Ironstag: Is there a chance the track could bend?


Not a chance my Hindu friend.

/I call the big one "Bitey."

//You just better have a damn good conductor.

///It's more of a Shelbyville idea...
 
2013-08-11 06:59:00 AM  

acefox1: Flint Ironstag: Is there a chance the track could bend?

Not a chance my Hindu friend.

/I call the big one "Bitey."

//You just better have a damn good conductor.

///It's more of a Shelbyville idea...


Or Brockway, Ogdenville and North Haverbrook.....
 
2013-08-11 07:01:25 AM  

padra: Hollie Maea

Even though it is open source it will still be protected. It will be open to anyone. There will undoubtedly be several groups that work on it. Definitely one down in California. I am working on setting up a working group to implement it up here in Portland.

Bring it up to Seattle while you are at it, will have to bore tunnels thru mountains. Maybe that is another reason why they are doing southern CA first


There are a lot fewer mountains between Portland and Seattle than SF and LA.
 
2013-08-11 07:41:41 AM  
Hmmm.  Where's the loo?
 
2013-08-11 08:08:34 AM  
From what I understand its not a vac tube, which could make things real interesting. But it would also explain the lower cost per mile if its some kind of air layer rail system.

So far as not patenting it, lets be fair: anyone with the money to build this probably has the means to ignore a patent anyway.
The government will just take any ideas it wants. The Chinese can simply steal the plans from the patent office after you've been forced to divulge the details. The trolls will claim they thought of it first because they've patented all things that aren't trains but better.
Patents don't give him anything he can't already get from a press conference and good connections.

/Easier to patent the little things, like accelerator parts and guide wheels.
/easier still to keep it secret if you aren't going to build anything for us few years.
 
2013-08-11 08:47:59 AM  

ThunderPelvis: FTFA:  The mercurial, fictional character of Tony Stark, played by Robert Downey Jr in the Iron Man films, is reputedly based on him.

Uhhh...who the f*ck wrote this??


Yeah, surprised the author could write from under the guy's desk while giving a beej there.

Iron Man was introduced in 1963; this guy was born in 1971. I'm sure there may be similarities, but please. Reality check, dude.
 
2013-08-11 09:28:08 AM  

doglover: Terry Pratchett's co-authored Long Earth stepper has a circuit that's powered by a potato.


That book frustrated me, because it couldn't pick a tone. Early on, it establishes the stepper and you go, "Okay, comedy, I get it," and then it gets very not comical at all. Then it suddenly gets funny again.

What I'm trying to say is that it's the sort of thing that shouldn't have been co-authored.
 
2013-08-11 09:37:06 AM  
Chicken pot chicken pot chicken pot pie!

(it's sad that that's all I have to contribute)
 
2013-08-11 09:38:39 AM  
Wait a second...Batman is going to announce a new transportation system?!??!  That is awesome!

/Which one of them has actual superpowers?  oh yeah
//Which one of them is a super rich playboy?  oh yeah
///Which one of them has a human assistant who keeps them grounded?  oh yeah
////Which one of them uses their resources as a super rich playboy to fund their "abilities"?  oh yeah
 
2013-08-11 09:41:00 AM  
Why all this talk of long range transportation?  The real bottle neck is local.

Cut everybody's commute time in half but have the same cost and you have a winner.  Oh I know, rezoning for mixed use communities.
 
2013-08-11 09:56:41 AM  

The wonderful travels of a turd: Tony Stark is clearly modeled on Howard Hughes. Bruce Wayne.


Let's be real.
 
2013-08-11 10:00:33 AM  
It's an old sci-fi trope. Maintaining a vacuum in a chamber a thousand miles long and ten feet in diameter is one of those things we won't crack with our current technological setting.

It'll be competition for the semi-ballistics and bean stalks. Just ask Friday.
 
2013-08-11 10:02:10 AM  

t3knomanser: That book frustrated me, because it couldn't pick a tone.


I didn't that I could tell who was writing which parts of the book, but mostly because I didn't care for the other guy's philosophical Americana crap. I just wanted to read more words set in place by the greatest living author I know.
 
2013-08-11 10:04:14 AM  

The wonderful travels of a turd: Tony Stark is clearly modeled on Howard Hughes.


Yeah thats what I came here to say.
 
2013-08-11 10:06:20 AM  

doglover: t3knomanser: That book frustrated me, because it couldn't pick a tone.

I didn't that I could tell who was writing which parts of the book, but mostly because I didn't care for the other guy's philosophical Americana crap. I just wanted to read more words set in place by the greatest living author I know.


You must not know many living authors.
 
2013-08-11 10:06:20 AM  

wildcardjack: It's an old sci-fi trope. Maintaining a vacuum in a chamber a thousand miles long and ten feet in diameter is one of those things we won't crack with our current technological setting.

It'll be competition for the semi-ballistics and bean stalks. Just ask Friday.


Again, it's not a vacuum tube.
 
2013-08-11 10:13:23 AM  

Ambivalence: And he's not patenting it. I wonder how many people will try to patent it in his place.


Patents do not work like that.
 
2013-08-11 10:18:14 AM  
So wait, TFA and the comments aren't quite clear. Is this a vaccuum tube? Because it won't work if it's a vaccuum tube...
 
2013-08-11 10:35:16 AM  
My heart says "cool", my head says that anything that involves building literally hundreds of miles of infrastructure is a huge challenge in a country like the US.

Any new mode has to compete with cars for medium journeys and planes for long haul; plus the geography of the US means that we need to connect a relatively large number of widely separated population centers. Planes can do that effectively because they only need major infrastructure at the end points: it's a hub-and-spoke system where the spokes are free, and new connections can be made very freely. And cars have the advantage that the cost-per-mile for roads is relatively low (and low-tech, which helps with the maintenance); plus, of course, there is so much existing infrastructure.

So any system -- this, maglev, high speed train -- that requires expensive infrastructure connecting every pair of endpoints is at a huge disadvantage.

As a historical comparison, it's worth looking at how few rail companies ever made a profit -- at least, for the original owners who bore the cost of construction; and before that, canals.

Maybe this could be a good thing for certain highly-traveled, population-dense regions such as the I95 corridor, but it's not a general solution here.
 
2013-08-11 10:40:40 AM  

mrlewish: Why all this talk of long range transportation?  The real bottle neck is local.

Cut everybody's commute time in half but have the same cost and you have a winner.  Oh I know, rezoning for mixed use communities.


Now you're making fascist socialist Commie libtard talk, and we won't have that in Jesus's America.
 
2013-08-11 10:44:51 AM  
well if it fails, I have a suggestion for what to do with the unfinished tunnels

idlewords.com/2007/04/the_alameda-weehawken_burrito_tunnel.htm
 
2013-08-11 10:59:09 AM  

czetie: My heart says "cool", my head says that anything that involves building literally hundreds of miles of infrastructure is a huge challenge in a country like the US.

Any new mode has to compete with cars for medium journeys and planes for long haul; plus the geography of the US means that we need to connect a relatively large number of widely separated population centers. Planes can do that effectively because they only need major infrastructure at the end points: it's a hub-and-spoke system where the spokes are free, and new connections can be made very freely. And cars have the advantage that the cost-per-mile for roads is relatively low (and low-tech, which helps with the maintenance); plus, of course, there is so much existing infrastructure.

So any system -- this, maglev, high speed train -- that requires expensive infrastructure connecting every pair of endpoints is at a huge disadvantage.

As a historical comparison, it's worth looking at how few rail companies ever made a profit -- at least, for the original owners who bore the cost of construction; and before that, canals.

Maybe this could be a good thing for certain highly-traveled, population-dense regions such as the I95 corridor, but it's not a general solution here.


I disagree.  Of course it's not going to replace any single mode of transportation, but for linking cities several hundred miles apart, it's clearly superior to any existing mode.  It is significantly faster than airplanes--especially when you take into account that airplanes are a "batch process" and you have to go hang out at the airport and wait for everyone to get on and go.  The Hyperloop operates on your schedule so you can get in and out much quicker.  Seattle to Portland by air is a good 3 hours from entering the airport to exiting the airport on the other side. With the Hyperloop you could probably do it in less than 45 minutes.  And yes, there is an upfront infrastructure cost, but it is less than most other modes, and since the energy requirements are much lower, you can keep ticket prices low.

And I don't buy the argument that existing modes are better because the infrastructure is already here.  I think Americans are on the verge of getting tired of the ridiculous notion that we can't ever build anything new.  This meme that we "can't afford infrastructure" is pretty new and is based only on perception.
 
2013-08-11 11:06:18 AM  

Hollie Maea: This meme that we "can't afford infrastructure" is pretty new and is based only on perception.


Are you sure it isn't at least partially based on the cost of supporting existing infrastructure as well as the massive corruption, waste, and stupidity that invariably accompany "public works" projects? Bridges that people use every day are falling down and you want to build a new way to do something we already have like 5 ways to do? Gee, I can't imagine why the idea isn't getting a lot of traction.
 
2013-08-11 11:24:37 AM  

padra: Bring it up to Seattle while you are at it, will have to bore tunnels thru mountains. Maybe that is another reason why they are doing southern CA first


I strongly suspect they're doing SoCal first because it connects 30 million people, versus what...3 million in the PNW?

/still thinks it's a White Elephant
 
2013-08-11 11:25:46 AM  

untaken_name: Hollie Maea: This meme that we "can't afford infrastructure" is pretty new and is based only on perception.

Are you sure it isn't at least partially based on the cost of supporting existing infrastructure as well as the massive corruption, waste, and stupidity that invariably accompany "public works" projects? Bridges that people use every day are falling down and you want to build a new way to do something we already have like 5 ways to do? Gee, I can't imagine why the idea isn't getting a lot of traction.


Bah. Again, it's all perception. We have plenty of money to build nice new things and fix the old stuff.  A Portland to Seattle Hyperloop would cost about 3 billion to build.  That's one week of running the Iraq war back when it was in the swing of things.  And then we would have it, and operations and maintenance could easily be paid for even with low ticket prices.

Fifty years ago, we covered the entire country with massive freeways.  Much larger undertaking, but we did it easily.  And this horseshiat that "well that was then, NOW we are broke" is a meaningless narrative.  We did it because we chose to.
 
2013-08-11 11:28:02 AM  

Stone Meadow: I strongly suspect they're doing SoCal first because it connects 30 million people, versus what...3 million in the PNW?


There's no reason why there has to be a "first"--or for that matter, a "they".  There's no doubt that a SoCal Hyperloop will be in the works right away.  But no one else has to wait until they are done to build one elsewhere.
 
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