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(Extreme Tech)   Statistics show that talking on a hand-held cell phone while driving does not lead to more accidents. Texting drivers are still assholes though   (extremetech.com) divider line 76
    More: Interesting, London School of Economics, accidents  
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1949 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Aug 2013 at 4:38 PM (36 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-10 04:01:12 PM
And that graphic was carefully controlled to eliminate other things that could skew the results like safety improvements?

Listen, anybody that has seen a person talk and drive at the same time knows it decreases performance. Anybody who thinks they can text and watch the road is going to have an accident.
 
2013-08-10 04:43:04 PM
"The mobile user data would include passengers as well as drivers. "

Well, good, because supposedly the ludicrous DUI/DWI laws were written using data from crashes where anyone was drinking, driver or not. All's fair, motherfarkers.
 
2013-08-10 04:45:03 PM

edmo: And that graphic was carefully controlled to eliminate other things that could skew the results like safety improvements?

Listen, anybody that has seen a person talk and drive at the same time knows it decreases performance. Anybody who thinks they can text and watch the road is going to have an accident.


Cell phone ownership and number of highway miles seems like a poor basis for the claim.
 
2013-08-10 04:45:51 PM
Maybe we are just shiatty drivers
 
2013-08-10 04:46:36 PM
"Statistics show that talking on a hand-held cell phone while driving does not lead to more accidents."

However dumbshiats looking down to scroll through contacts or dial the number does.
 
2013-08-10 04:47:21 PM
Bull farking shiat. I like playing guess of they're drunk, 90, or on the phone. Generally, they're on the phone.
 
2013-08-10 04:48:27 PM
my dad was killed in an auto accident after some some chick blew through a stop sign and hit him.

she was talking on her phone and "didn't see the stop sign," according to the police report.

so, you know, fark those statistics.
 
2013-08-10 04:49:12 PM
FTFA: There's a damning graphic in their study that compares cellphone ownership over 20 years vs. car crashes. Ownership is steadily up, crashes and fatal crashes are steadily down.

Did their study also prove that correlation does in fact equal causation? Otherwise this study seems like nothing other than a fun way to troll the media and statisticians
 
2013-08-10 04:50:30 PM
Well this is an example of poor study design. Ecological fallacy galore. Someone should be along any time now to post about pirates and global warming.
 
2013-08-10 04:50:49 PM

HotGore: Maybe we are just shiatty drivers


shiatty drivers + taking "acceptable risks."
 
2013-08-10 04:53:52 PM
Lemme guess... these statistics came from the Whiny Self Entitled Assholes Who Make Sh*t Up So They Can Get Their Own Way No Matter How Petty the Issue Despite the Costs to Society Institute.

I love the work they've done for the GOP. Guess they're branching out to the more general selfish dillhole population.
 
2013-08-10 04:54:55 PM
i.qkme.me
 
2013-08-10 04:56:06 PM
edmo: And that graphic was carefully controlled to eliminate other things that could skew the results like safety improvements?

Listen, anybody that has seen a person talk and drive at the same time knows it decreases performance. Anybody who thinks they can text and watch the road is going to have an accident.


As someone who drives at work, I can say that people on cell phones are a bigger hazard on the road these days than drunks. Cell phone and driving should carry penalties AT LEAST as stiff as DUI
 
2013-08-10 04:57:35 PM

farkingismybusiness: [i.qkme.me image 431x712]


By the looks of it, 60.
 
2013-08-10 04:58:57 PM
It's easy to challenge the study, or at least to nibble around the edges. The mobile user data would include passengers as well as drivers. Cars are getting safer all the time and drunks are being policed off the roads more than in the past. Passing a hands-free law isn't the same as getting people to obey it. Texting may be more distracting than making a call, as the authors themselves note. And so forth. But still, the research should be kept in mind when the the Department of Transportation and the states ponder their next steps.

Even the article admits this study's retarded.
 
2013-08-10 04:59:14 PM
FTA:  They identified drivers as those whose calls were regularly handed off from cell tower to cell tower. At the time, most carriers offered free calling after 9 pm. Bhargava and Pathania found motorists increased their calling by 7% at 9pm. They pulled up data on eight million car crashes in those four years as well as all fatal crashes. Their finding: no statistical link. Crashes didn't go up when calling went up.

That is a very dubious conclusion to make from that. Looking at only a very narrow window of time, especially one where there might not be that many people out driving, doesn't seem particularly valid. Also, cellphones weren't nearly as ubiquitous back in 2005 as they are today; there are a lot more younger people with cellphones now than there were back then. Also the study had no way to know who in the car was using a cell phone. In short, bad study is bad.
 
2013-08-10 05:06:33 PM
Got pulled over on the 101 last Monday afternoon for chatting on the phone. CHP officer let me off with a fix-it ticket for not having a valid insurance card in the glovebox. $25 ticket vs a $900+ ticket.

/second time CHP has been cool to me
//LAPD can eat a portable dumptster bag chock full of drizzly dicks
///slashie
 
2013-08-10 05:07:05 PM
Seriously, just get off the phone!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xk1vCqfYpos

If I take a call, or check text messages I pull over and make the car safe. Technically I'm still in the wrong because the law here is that you need the ignition off *and* I believe the key removed. (Not 100% sure about the latter).

I've been in situations where someone is about to pull out onto a road and they're talking on their mobile phone - so I've stood in front of their car indicating for them to get off it before I move so they can too. Sooner or later, they do.
 
2013-08-10 05:07:30 PM
dump(T!)ster WTF...
 
2013-08-10 05:15:24 PM
I'm waiting for a ban on passengers in vehicles since talking to multiple people is obviously much more deadly than having a single conversation.
 
2013-08-10 05:17:04 PM
i1280.photobucket.com
I commute with self-absorbed phone-talking douchebags daily.
Drunks are better drivers.
 
2013-08-10 05:19:22 PM

edmo: And that graphic was carefully controlled to eliminate other things that could skew the results like safety improvements?

Listen, anybody that has seen a person talk and drive at the same time knows it decreases performance. Anybody who thinks they can text and watch the road is going to have an accident.


What I find interesting is the slight uptick in fatal crashes, starting around 2002 and taking a slow rise from then on. My estimate is that 2002 is right around the time that texting started to become a widespread form of communication.

I have a few observations about car crashes. These are from personal experience and may or may not represent statistical reality:
-Over the last 10 years, as older vehicles have been taken off the road, the consequences of traffic accidents have become less severe. People are walking away from accidents in a 2006 car that would have injured them badly in a 1992 car.

-There has been a noticable increase in horrific accidents as a percentage, the circumstances of which leads one to wonder if the driver was paying any attention at all. The most notable examples, all from the last year: a young woman rear-ended a parked FedEx truck at 50-60 mph, putting most of her car under the truck and killing her. She was found to have made a Facebook post one minute prior to the accident and still had the app open. Two young men having a head-on collision that either one should have been able to avoid, seriously injuring both. A car with four high school kids runs a red at a busy intersection, gets t-boned, killing a passenger and seriously injuring another. The driver's account was that he was looking between the seat and the console, where he had dropped his ringing phone, and never saw the red light.

I don't know what to do about it. People as a whole are stupid, and they all think they're better than average at multitasking. All the reason, education, PSAs and scolding in the world will not convince the average teen or early twenty-something that you know better than them, and quite a few older people take offense when YOU try to tell THEM what they're capable of.
 
2013-08-10 05:23:46 PM
Invalid study conclusion is invalid.

/moran conclusion based on ridiculous assumption
 
2013-08-10 05:23:58 PM
"Statistics show that talking on a hand-held cell phone while driving does not lead to more accidents" ... than talking on a hands-free device, which is just as dangerous.

FTFAFY
 
2013-08-10 05:24:56 PM

Occam's Disposable Razor: I'm waiting for a ban on passengers in vehicles since talking to multiple people is obviously much more deadly than having a single conversation.


Except in that scenario both hands are still free to drive the car. AFAIK hands free car phones are still allowed.
 
2013-08-10 05:29:58 PM

edmo: And that graphic was carefully controlled to eliminate other things that could skew the results like safety improvements?

Listen, anybody that has seen a person talk and drive at the same time knows it decreases performance. Anybody who thinks they can text and watch the road is going to have an accident.


They're talking about talking and driving, not texting and driving.

I have long felt the issue with talking and driving is bogus, the issue isn't the phone, it's getting too involved in the conversation.

arasmin: "Statistics show that talking on a hand-held cell phone while driving does not lead to more accidents."

However dumbshiats looking down to scroll through contacts or dial the number does.


Of course--you don't call while you're driving!
 
2013-08-10 05:34:21 PM
I Like the recently enacted cellphone&driving ban here in MD. Gives me a good excuse Not to answer my Boss who is the Only person trying to call me on my way in to work in the AM. SOB calls me all the time before I get to the office 'cause HE won't be there when we open up!
 
2013-08-10 05:35:52 PM

lizyrd: edmo: And that graphic was carefully controlled to eliminate other things that could skew the results like safety improvements?

Listen, anybody that has seen a person talk and drive at the same time knows it decreases performance. Anybody who thinks they can text and watch the road is going to have an accident.

What I find interesting is the slight uptick in fatal crashes, starting around 2002 and taking a slow rise from then on. My estimate is that 2002 is right around the time that texting started to become a widespread form of communication.

I have a few observations about car crashes. These are from personal experience and may or may not represent statistical reality:
-Over the last 10 years, as older vehicles have been taken off the road, the consequences of traffic accidents have become less severe. People are walking away from accidents in a 2006 car that would have injured them badly in a 1992 car.


I wonder if that has anything to do with more automatic transmissions these days than in previous years. The devil finds work for idle hands, as it were. (Atheists, relax it's just an idiom, so kindly don't lose your shiat).
 
2013-08-10 05:42:01 PM

edmo: And that graphic was carefully controlled to eliminate other things that could skew the results like safety improvements?

Listen, anybody that has seen a person talk and drive at the same time knows it decreases performance. Anybody who thinks they can text and watch the road is going to have an accident.


Well some of us tried to use that same line of reasoning with stoners who keep insisting that stoned drivers are the safest people in the universe even though anyone who's ever seen someone stoned knows they suck at driving.  It didn't convince them at all.  Guess it all depends on what agenda you're advocating for, eh?
 
2013-08-10 05:43:50 PM

MrHelpful: edmo: And that graphic was carefully controlled to eliminate other things that could skew the results like safety improvements?

Listen, anybody that has seen a person talk and drive at the same time knows it decreases performance. Anybody who thinks they can text and watch the road is going to have an accident.

Well some of us tried to use that same line of reasoning with stoners who keep insisting that stoned drivers are the safest people in the universe even though anyone who's ever seen someone stoned knows they suck at driving.  It didn't convince them at all.  Guess it all depends on what agenda you're advocating for, eh?


Both sides are bad so drive and text while stoned?
 
2013-08-10 05:47:07 PM

runcible spork: "Statistics show that talking on a hand-held cell phone while driving does not lead to more accidents" ... than talking on a hands-free device, which is just as dangerous.

FTFAFY


Funny, I have both hands on the wheel with my hands-free device, and the only time a hand goes off the wheel is to push the button (hands-free dialing). It is the equivalent to talking to a passenger, or singing to a song on the radio. Tell me how this is just as dangerous.
 
2013-08-10 05:55:40 PM
It's easy to spot people who are texting or facebook-ing while they drive. They leave an inordinate amount of space in front of their car and frequently tap their brakes for no reason.

If you're doing this, and a guy on a sport bike blows around your car and scares the shiat out of you, that was me, and yes, I scared you on purpose.
 
2013-08-10 05:56:51 PM
It doesn't really matter WHAT you are doing. If it is somthing OTHER than paying "FULL" attention to the road and the business of navigating a 2000LB+ missile around people and objects then you are a Douche.
There are people who can chew gum and walk and there are those who can't...
Long before cell phones people were losing control because they were tuning the radio...
 
2013-08-10 05:58:14 PM
I claim bullshiat. My own personal experience of watching idiots on cellphones cause traffic mayhem by not paying attention to their surroundings while on the phone.
IE doing 45 in the left center farking lane of a 5 lane highway while screaming at someone on the farking phone. I've seen idiots on cell phones run red lights because their too busy to bother looking. I've seen them take 20 seconds plus to notice there was a green light.

The reason they make this claim is that no one is going to admit to being on the phone after being in an accident.
 
2013-08-10 06:00:47 PM

edmo: And that graphic was carefully controlled to eliminate other things that could skew the results like safety improvements?

Listen, anybody that has seen a person talk and drive at the same time knows it decreases performance. Anybody who thinks they can text and watch the road is going to have an accident.


Not always. I've seen quite a few people pull it off. It was the people around them having the accidents.

Tends to be the folks doing the right thing and trying to avoid the asshats with their cells that end up off the road and in a ditch. The folks with the cells just continue on, oblivious to the carnage they caused.
 
2013-08-10 06:07:58 PM

Z-clipped: It's easy to spot people who are texting or facebook-ing while they drive. They leave an inordinate amount of space in front of their car and frequently tap their brakes for no reason.

If you're doing this, and a guy on a sport bike blows around your car and scares the shiat out of you, that was me, and yes, I scared you on purpose.


Wouldn't you rather keep a wide berth from an unpredictable driver? And a rider did something like that to me once (Except with more horn) after I nearly hit him. (Not on the phone, just newish to driving). To be honest, I'm glad he did because I'm a lot more aware of motorcyclists now.
 
2013-08-10 06:11:50 PM
Some people can make simple phone calls while driving, some can't.  Let's give cops another reason to pull us over and ruin our days/lives.  Good call.
 
2013-08-10 06:12:23 PM

MrHelpful: Well some of us tried to use that same line of reasoning with stoners who keep insisting that stoned drivers are the safest people in the universe even though anyone who's ever seen someone stoned knows they suck at driving. It didn't convince them at all. Guess it all depends on what agenda you're advocating for, eh?


Only the true idiots use that argument. The rest of us know it's a concern and want it to be treated the same as any other DUI. Testing is the problem but I'm sure there must be a way to use a combo of erratic driving leads to road side test leads to check the pupils to maybe some kind of optical scanner and a facial swab to detect THC on the skin then a car search and then downtown for any other testing.

Get a hands free or wait to you are parked. You really are not that important.
 
2013-08-10 06:14:21 PM
It isn't that I have never talked on the phone while driving, but it is the way you do it.

Trying to dial on an android device while driving is difficult.  Dialing on flip, while not advisable, can be done.

I have talked on on the phone while driving, but conversations go something like this.

Hello, note I am driving.
Yes.
No I can't then.
How about 10:00
Talk to you later.


I don't get into extended conversations, and driving is always first.

/Waiting for the Android flip...
 
2013-08-10 06:18:55 PM
CarrieWhite,
If I take a call, or check text messages I pull over and make the car safe. Technically I'm still in the wrong because the law here is that you need the ignition off *and* I believe the key removed. (Not 100% sure about the latter).


I do believe texting while driving will be the next dwi and some lazy assh**e cops will start giving it to people who are sitting in drivers seat in park with the car running. Because of public $afety.

/But it would be nice if people would not text and drive.
 
2013-08-10 06:29:19 PM

sparkeyjames: I claim bullshiat. My own personal experience of watching idiots on cellphones cause traffic mayhem by not paying attention to their surroundings while on the phone.
IE doing 45 in the left center farking lane of a 5 lane highway while screaming at someone on the farking phone. I've seen idiots on cell phones run red lights because their too busy to bother looking. I've seen them take 20 seconds plus to notice there was a green light.

The reason they make this claim is that no one is going to admit to being on the phone after being in an accident.


I guess I will have to invoke the baserate fallacy combined with confirmation bias. You see someone acting like an idiot on the road while they are on the phone, so BINGO, your hypothesis is correct.

What you missed was the amount of people who are idiots on the road. Some of those are on the phone others have one less excuse.

I think the bigger issue here is that some people cannot be trusted with a self propelled land missile and to save us from them the rest of us can go eat a shiat sammich.
 
FNG [TotalFark]
2013-08-10 06:39:09 PM
Virginia made texting while driving illegal last month, but you can still talk on your cell phone. Great first step at least.
 
2013-08-10 06:41:07 PM
BetterMetalSnake
I think the bigger issue here is that some people cannot be trusted with a self propelled land missile and to save us from them the rest of us can go eat a shiat sammich.


You think we should have testing like in Europe where more skill is required, great.

I say go one step further and if people can prove themselves able to text and drive through a test, put that on the license. Have one for other challenges like being allowed to drive after three beer or having a screaming baby in the back.

/Lookout for pissed off voters in Florida.
 
2013-08-10 06:42:50 PM

BetterMetalSnake: rest of us can go eat a shiat sammich.


Or... yanno... get a hands free device. Seriously they aren't expensive and come in many different types.
 
2013-08-10 06:44:26 PM

farkingismybusiness:


I want to see one of these where the text is "The Killer is hiding in the back seat!"
 
2013-08-10 06:45:12 PM
I believe texting while driving should be legal.  The moment you cause harm to anybody's life or property, you hang.  That means a minor fender bender, hang.  Driving eratically while texting is a felony with automatic loss of driving privilages forever, a huge fine and a year in prison.
 
2013-08-10 06:48:53 PM

Oldiron_79: edmo: And that graphic was carefully controlled to eliminate other things that could skew the results like safety improvements?

Listen, anybody that has seen a person talk and drive at the same time knows it decreases performance. Anybody who thinks they can text and watch the road is going to have an accident.

As someone who drives at work, I can say that people on cell phones are a bigger hazard on the road these days than drunks. Cell phone and driving should carry penalties AT LEAST as stiff as DUI


What work do you drive for that doesn't have you talking on a phone or a radio? What's the difference between someone talking on a cell phone and a cop talking with dispatch on his radio? I've been driving over 40K miles each year for the last 13 years and am frequently on the phone with the office or a client. That's over 500,000 wreck-free miles. I don't need a law to tell me to pay attention to the road while I'm talking. I use a bluetooth earpiece for both talking and texting, and I highly recommend one for anyone who drives so as to remove the encumbrance of holding a phone while driving.
I've seen plenty of careless drivers talking on their phones. I've also seen as many if not more doing other things carelessly like digging in their glove-box, or putting on make-up. You are only distracted by your phone if you let it distract you. I knew a guy that wrecked because he was looking at a zit on his nose in the mirror.
 
2013-08-10 07:02:50 PM
Anyone who is caught texting while driving should receive a minimum 5 year sentence.

Anyone who is caught twittering or posting on facebook while driving should be shot on sight.

farking loser ass nerds.

/anyone who does the twitter or facebook shiat should die anyway.
 
2013-08-10 07:05:36 PM
And cell phones are perfectly safe to use on an airplane, too. You think of any of the government types or their apologizers will admit it or change it if admitted?  The state cannot be wrong, ever - first commandment of government worship.
 
2013-08-10 07:10:48 PM
who paid them for the study cell phone folks??
they just did not up and do it
other countries have found that is does cause accidents

HOW ABOUT A NUMBER FROM POLICE ON ACCIDENTS CAUSED BY CELL USE???
 
2013-08-10 07:18:06 PM

Jarhead_h: And cell phones are perfectly safe to use on an airplane, too. You think of any of the government types or their apologizers will admit it or change it if admitted?  The state cannot be wrong, ever - first commandment of government worship.


They are already starting to look at changing those laws. Sorry if erring on the side of public safety inconvenienced you for the whole 10 minutes it takes for a freaking plane to take off.

Cripes... we got a bunch of Jack Bauers and international diplomats trying to prevent WWIII up in here. I had no idea the average Farker was so important.
 
2013-08-10 07:20:48 PM
Call me crazy, but could the fact there are fewer people commuting after 9pm have had anything to do with fewer accidents?  Lets make sure:  drop carrier prices during peak rush-hour traffic, and see if TFA's conclusions continue to hold.
 
2013-08-10 07:44:20 PM

UsikFark: farkingismybusiness: [i.qkme.me image 431x712]

By the looks of it, 60.


Don't underestimate, I would say around 115 would be a more accurate number.
 
2013-08-10 07:44:33 PM
TSB
I am a safety manager for one of our plants, and at a gathering of Safety Mgrs a while back, I was assigned to "write up a cell phone policy for the region", in preparation for California's ban on hand held cell phones coming that year. A couple of the plants already had hand-held cellphone bans in place, and my job was to write up the new policy  for the entire region to ban the practice. The VP who "volunteered" me for the task was dishing out some payback, for me being outspoken in opposition to his position on other subjects during the day, and this was his way to give me work and shut me down.

So, I did my research, because if I am going to write a policy, it's going to be based on as many facts as I can get, and found that most researchers agree that talking while driving is distracting: somewhat akin to a drink or two, for most people.  However, all the research showed that there was statistically no difference between holding the cellphone in your hand and talking, and talking on a bluetooth device, Onstar device, etc..  It was the act of talking that 'dumbed the brain down', not the use of a hand to hold the phone.

So, I tossed all the studies and research data into an addendum, and wrote the policy:  use of cell phones, PERIOD, while driving is unsafe, risky, and would not be allowed under company rules.  I sent it up the chain of command, all the way to the VP's desk who volunteered me, and it has sat there, for two years now, without comment.

Because I know that VP, his boss, his peers, everyone at Corporate, and the entire Sales Department constantly drive and talk on their hands-free devices. It's been two years, and I haven't been volunteered to write another policy for the region, either.
 
2013-08-10 08:28:22 PM

graeylin: TSB
I am a safety manager for one of our plants, and at a gathering of Safety Mgrs a while back, I was assigned to "write up a cell phone policy for the region", in preparation for California's ban on hand held cell phones coming that year. A couple of the plants already had hand-held cellphone bans in place, and my job was to write up the new policy  for the entire region to ban the practice. The VP who "volunteered" me for the task was dishing out some payback, for me being outspoken in opposition to his position on other subjects during the day, and this was his way to give me work and shut me down.

So, I did my research, because if I am going to write a policy, it's going to be based on as many facts as I can get, and found that most researchers agree that talking while driving is distracting: somewhat akin to a drink or two, for most people.  However, all the research showed that there was statistically no difference between holding the cellphone in your hand and talking, and talking on a bluetooth device, Onstar device, etc..  It was the act of talking that 'dumbed the brain down', not the use of a hand to hold the phone.

So, I tossed all the studies and research data into an addendum, and wrote the policy:  use of cell phones, PERIOD, while driving is unsafe, risky, and would not be allowed under company rules.  I sent it up the chain of command, all the way to the VP's desk who volunteered me, and it has sat there, for two years now, without comment.

Because I know that VP, his boss, his peers, everyone at Corporate, and the entire Sales Department constantly drive and talk on their hands-free devices. It's been two years, and I haven't been volunteered to write another policy for the region, either.


Riddle me this... How does it compare to having an active passenger or a radio? Talking through a hands free device seems to me is rated like a passenger
 
2013-08-10 08:44:48 PM
If you have the ability to answer your phone or start a call, you have the ability to pull over until you're finished with it.
 
2013-08-10 09:11:37 PM

Whatchoo Talkinbout: I commute with self-absorbed phone-talking douchebags daily.
Drunks are better drivers.


Yup. If you cant focus on the road more than the conversation you shouldnt touch a phone.
Multitasking during a dangerous task that has little room for error is not for everyone.
 
2013-08-10 09:12:40 PM
BULL. //That is all.
 
2013-08-10 09:22:23 PM
It is not a one size fits all condition. Scrolling for a contact, reading email, setting a GPS and dialing on a damn touch screen are risky. The risk of talking is variable. If I am chatting with a friend I let them know I am driving so that I don't feel concerned about dropping my end of the conversation. Those types of calls can improve safety as it helps keep me alert on a long drive in the middle of nowhere. Talking about something contentious with family members or coworkers in city traffic is again kinda of risky. If talking where the issue they why are CB radios so common in long haul?
 
2013-08-10 10:47:11 PM

biscuitsngravy: Got pulled over on the 101 last Monday afternoon for chatting on the phone. CHP officer let me off with a fix-it ticket for not having a valid insurance card in the glovebox. $25 ticket vs a $900+ ticket.


A "talking on cell phone" ticket is $900? Last I heard they were kind of in line with other minor moving violations, about $160.

Still, it's good to know that not all officers out there are dicknoses. I'll have to check my insurance cards; didn't realize we were still required to produce them since insurance status is now reported to the DMV (and, in turn, cops) by ins. co.'s automatically.
 
2013-08-10 11:49:13 PM

People_are_Idiots: graeylin: TSB


... It was the act of talking that 'dumbed the brain down', not the use of a hand to hold the phone.

So, I tossed all the studies and research data into an addendum, and wrote the policy:  use of cell phones, PERIOD, while driving is unsafe, risky, and would not be allowed under company rules.  I sent it up the chain of command, all the way to the VP's desk who volunteered me, and it has sat there, for two years now, without comment.

Because I know that VP, his boss, his peers, everyone at Corporate, and the entire Sales Department constantly drive and talk on their hands-free devices. It's been two years, and I haven't been volunteered to write another policy for the region, either.

Riddle me this... How does it compare to having an active passenger or a radio? Talking through a hands free device seems to me is rated like a passenger


That's very simple. You do not interact with the radio - your brain is not engaged in an active way.
If you have a passenger that just talks then he/she can be like a radio, so you could be OK with that because again, it can be received passively.
When the passenger is trying to engage you in conversation and expect you to answer coherently, that can be as bad as the telephone conversation. Actually, one could argue that the telephone is worse because you are trying to picture the person you are talking to in your mind and this already takes your attention off the road. And then, any subject of the conversation that is not related to what you are doing at the moment is splitting your attention between what you are doing, and what the conversation is all about, which is not exactly a great thing, if what you are doing is driving on a busy highway or navigating a city traffic during the rush hour.
 
2013-08-11 12:57:00 AM

CarrieWhite: Seriously, just get off the phone!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xk1vCqfYpos

If I take a call, or check text messages I pull over and make the car safe. Technically I'm still in the wrong because the law here is that you need the ignition off *and* I believe the key removed. (Not 100% sure about the latter).

I've been in situations where someone is about to pull out onto a road and they're talking on their mobile phone - so I've stood in front of their car indicating for them to get off it before I move so they can too. Sooner or later, they do.


What is so important it can't wait FIVE F*CKING MINUTES????
 
2013-08-11 03:25:56 AM
The graph I want to see is: # of car improvements and safety features on a car since 1985 vs. number of cellphone drivers.

Believe me when I say I AGREE with the majority of people who think that cellphones cause more crashes, but the data doesn't support it and cars are STILL becoming safer every year. Now with "collision detection" systems added, and most likely soon to be made available on base models, it's just no comparison anymore.  It's the same argument that cell phones on airplanes cause interference to the navigation systems.

Now if we can get a study of people who carry a license with demerits/points and see the relation to crashes, i'm sure you might have something. Retarded drivers are still going to be retarded, either with or without a cell phone.
 
2013-08-11 04:18:08 AM
Gyrfalcon, Debbie totally got this hot new boyfriend!
 
2013-08-11 04:55:25 AM

aenemated: my dad was killed in an auto accident after some some chick blew through a stop sign and hit him.

she was talking on her phone and "didn't see the stop sign," according to the police report.

so, you know, fark those statistics.


Sorry for your loss. RIP
What ticks me off even more is the latest TV commercials for new cars being "smartphone friendly"
STFU and drive!
 
2013-08-11 05:23:00 AM
Aenemated, sorry from me too. Hopefully the young woman got served some real justice.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-08-11 06:13:14 AM
A study within the last few years found that people who use phones while driving tend to suck at driving anyway. That correlation reconciles the 1997 study, the current report, and the study finding that cell phone bans are counterproductive.
 
2013-08-11 07:17:33 AM

People_are_Idiots: Riddle me this... How does it compare to having an active passenger or a radio? Talking through a hands free device seems to me is rated like a passenger


A radio is not interactive

A passenger may have some concerned about getting in an accident
and watches for and may alert possible threats or at least moderate the conversation
when driver attention is obviously required.
 
2013-08-11 07:26:32 AM

MarkEC: Oldiron_79: edmo: And that graphic was carefully controlled to eliminate other things that could skew the results like safety improvements?

Listen, anybody that has seen a person talk and drive at the same time knows it decreases performance. Anybody who thinks they can text and watch the road is going to have an accident.

As someone who drives at work, I can say that people on cell phones are a bigger hazard on the road these days than drunks. Cell phone and driving should carry penalties AT LEAST as stiff as DUI

What work do you drive for that doesn't have you talking on a phone or a radio? What's the difference between someone talking on a cell phone and a cop talking with dispatch on his radio? I've been driving over 40K miles each year for the last 13 years and am frequently on the phone with the office or a client. That's over 500,000 wreck-free miles. I don't need a law to tell me to pay attention to the road while I'm talking. I use a bluetooth earpiece for both talking and texting, and I highly recommend one for anyone who drives so as to remove the encumbrance of holding a phone while driving.
I've seen plenty of careless drivers talking on their phones. I've also seen as many if not more doing other things carelessly like digging in their glove-box, or putting on make-up. You are only distracted by your phone if you let it distract you. I knew a guy that wrecked because he was looking at a zit on his nose in the mirror.


Well theres plenty of people that can not drive like they are drunk when they are technically over the limit, whats your point.
 
2013-08-11 08:35:06 AM
Bull, I have to commute with idiots who weave across lanes because their hand is too busy with the phone instead the turn signal. They are so distracted they block traffic driving below the limit as they're looking down at their screens or the floor after they drop it.
News flash talkers: Your call is not more important than anyone's life on the freeway. Get over yourselves.
 
2013-08-11 08:37:34 AM
You are comparing distractions to impairment, they are not equivalent. Going after cell phones would be like making it illegal to drive under the influence of Vodak but legal with Gin. I'm all for people getting tickets for swerving while talking on the phone or any other action that causes a loss of attention leading to bad driving. The phone is not the problem.
 
2013-08-11 10:03:24 AM
"Statistics show..." is a great way to start a headline. That way I know the article is crap and I don't need to bother to read it.
 
2013-08-11 11:43:40 AM

zepillin: People_are_Idiots: Riddle me this... How does it compare to having an active passenger or a radio? Talking through a hands free device seems to me is rated like a passenger

A radio is not interactive

A passenger may have some concerned about getting in an accident
and watches for and may alert possible threats or at least moderate the conversation
when driver attention is obviously required.


Sorry, I call BS. I actually am active when listening to radio (mostly cause I play songs I know and love) so I do hum, tap, and even sing in the car. Also I do move the dial a lot when commercials are on (and I have to take my eyes off the road for such). Even when playing my mp3 player, I have to take my eyes off the road.

9 times out of 10 passengers are asking more about nonsensical items you have to think on, which can also distract you from the road (that itself was proven). Also, more often than not, the passenger is not paying attention nowadays ("Oh I'm not driving" attitude).

My hands-free device is on my visor, has voice dialing with common names ("Call My House" dials my home number), and because of the position is easy to press without taking my eyes off the road. Unless the conversation is too engaging, I keep my eyes on the road and talk normally, like if a passenger was in the car... only my passenger is forward instead of to the right (or left depending on country).
 
2013-08-11 11:46:40 AM
The chart doesn't prove that cellphone use does not impair driving.  However, that doesn't mean the statistics shown are worthless.

I've made a hobby of tabulating driver cellphone usage whenever I'm waiting at a light.  I count only people talking on a phone held to their ear.  I gave up trying to count texting drivers since a) it's impossible to tell what they're looking at in their lap, and b) it's actually very uncommon.  So, by my tabulations, (counting only passenger vehicles) roughly 1/6 drivers is on the phone at any one time.  The percentage is very slightly higher for women, but pretty dang close overall.

If this statistic is even remotely close to accurate on a national scale, then clearly handheld cellphone use is not the issue some would purport it to be.  It's disingenuous in the extreme to state that the reduction of accidents is strongly influenced by cracking down on drunk driving while in the same breath claim that talking on the phone is as dangerous as drunk driving.  Does anyone honestly believe that before this crackdown, one in six drivers was drunk?

It would also seem that while 'safer vehicles' could easily be a strong factor in the reduction of fatalities, it is much less so a factor in accidents overall.

Before we go regulating device locks that block phone usage in a moving vehicle, we'll need far more than anecdotes.  This study absolutely does not prove that such a law is unnecessary.  BUT it does (at least in my mind) show that 'conventional wisdom' on the subject is not enough.
 
2013-08-11 01:50:07 PM
So many angry people who want to control their fellow man.
 
2013-08-11 03:59:02 PM
I have a set of "Horn Blaster" train horns on my truck. I catch a person all over the road  trying to drive/text  you can be damn sure they will get a 3 second blast of my horns. Most times I swear they shiat themselves, 99% will put the phone away, the other 1% will flip me off for a while.
 
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