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(The State)   "So this janitor at a school has tuberculosis. Do you think we should test the kids now, or should we wait two and a half months?"   (thestate.com) divider line 23
    More: Asinine, tuberculosis, Richland, lung disease, Medical Affairs Committee meeting  
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2554 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Aug 2013 at 5:38 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



23 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-08-09 04:46:14 PM  
Are people in a school required to get a yearly TB Skin test?
 
2013-08-09 05:00:22 PM  
That's one of those get on your knees and pray it is not one of the total drug resistant strains.

/time to bring back the sanatoriums.
 
2013-08-09 05:07:39 PM  
He deserves a severe beating

/mop mop mop all day long
 
2013-08-09 05:45:37 PM  
Oh, please.  When do the kids at school ever associate with the janitor. Well, except Bender.
 
2013-08-09 05:46:16 PM  
24.media.tumblr.com

This is my new mop. George, my friend, he gave me this mop. This is a pretty good mop. It's not as good as my first mop. I miss my first mop, but this is still a good mop. Sometimes you just hafta take what life gives ya, 'cause life is like a mop and sometimes life gets full of dirt and crud and bugs and hairballs and stuff... you, you, you gotta clean it out. You, you, you gotta put it in here and rinse it off and start all over again and, and sometimes, sometimes life sticks to the floor so bad you know a mop, a mop, it's not good enough, it's not good enough. You, you gotta get down there, like, with a toothbrush, you know, and you gotta, you gotta really scrub 'cause you gotta get it off. You gotta really try to get it off. But if that doesn't work, that doesn't work, you can't give up. You gotta, you gotta stand right up. You, you gotta run to a window and say, "Hey! These floors are dirty as hell, and I'm not gonna take it any more!"
 
2013-08-09 05:47:37 PM  

"At the hearing, Templeton told senators her agency had made mistakes, saying "I assure you, that will not happen again.""


Famous last words.

 
2013-08-09 05:48:45 PM  
One of the spookier experiences of my life was visiting Mammoth Cave. You walk in the cave about a hundred yards. Even on a bright sunny day, at this point you can barely see shiat without the artificial lighting. Then they tell you about how many people died of tuberculosis right in that spot when that part of the cave system served as a makeshift tuberculosis ward, and how the dying people would grab new people and smell them "to smell the sunlight on their hair."

That was bad, but I brushed it off like "Well, now we have doctors and antibiotics." Then my stepmom's Peruvian mother died of tuberculosis a few years ago. She was in her mid-fifties. She had a treatable form, but was just too poor to pay for good medical care.

I knew people died of treatable stuff all the time all over the world, but I didn't quite get how bad we were talking until then.
 
2013-08-09 05:53:35 PM  
Why not just pray it away cause you know how well that works.
 
2013-08-09 06:05:16 PM  
They could have tested immediately but just kept the results secret.
 
2013-08-09 06:09:49 PM  
You're my huckleberry
 
2013-08-09 06:13:59 PM  

hardinparamedic: Are people in a school required to get a yearly TB Skin test?


No - at least not in Australia. It's mainly because TB cases are too rare to warrant such regular testing. They don't really have an effective vaccine for it yet either, so they can't introduce it into the schedule.
 
2013-08-09 06:14:16 PM  

Chinchillazilla: One of the spookier experiences of my life was visiting Mammoth Cave. You walk in the cave about a hundred yards. Even on a bright sunny day, at this point you can barely see shiat without the artificial lighting. Then they tell you about how many people died of tuberculosis right in that spot when that part of the cave system served as a makeshift tuberculosis ward, and how the dying people would grab new people and smell them "to smell the sunlight on their hair."

That was bad, but I brushed it off like "Well, now we have doctors and antibiotics." Then my stepmom's Peruvian mother died of tuberculosis a few years ago. She was in her mid-fifties. She had a treatable form, but was just too poor to pay for good medical care.

I knew people died of treatable stuff all the time all over the world, but I didn't quite get how bad we were talking until then.


You want to get really pissed about a curable disease.

Cholera.

The treatment is ~ your body weight in water.   They do tests on people where they give them Cholera because we can triviallyturn it from "most deadly disease ever" to "ate some really bad Mexican food". And we didn't figure any of this out until the 1800's.  OK then.
 
2013-08-09 06:18:35 PM  
That article was long and exceptionally confusing. In summation, janitor tested positive for TB on Match 8th and told not to come back. Another staffer did too, and finished out the school year, but it's unclear whether they knew. Somehow, 100 people in the school have now tested positive, 53 of them kids, and 10 of those kids have TB now. Those people's lives have now changed forever for the worse, and they deserve aaaaaall the monies. This is a really horrible showing of ass-covering administration in action.
 
2013-08-09 06:19:07 PM  

We simply don't have the money to make sure janitor's, lunch ladies, or any of the other working poor who come in contact with our children daily have health care. If they can't afford health care screw em. It's the American way, especially in the south.


Even though South Carolina is one of the states that spends way more tax dollars than it pays in, they'll still vote to cut taxes and not realize they're voting against their own interests while doing so.


Source

 
2013-08-09 06:20:45 PM  
Subby here...and uncle of one of the children who got infected.  It's just postively heartbreaking that the little guy has to go through this -- he's an incredibly warm and friendly little guy, and has faced prior medical issues with more bravery than I would have.

I'm not sure which makes me more angry: the gross incompentence of the DHEC, or the fact that the janitor in question had to be forceably confined to a treatment center to prevent him from endangering others through his refusal to cooperate.
 
2013-08-09 06:21:10 PM  

meyerkev: Chinchillazilla: One of the spookier experiences of my life was visiting Mammoth Cave. You walk in the cave about a hundred yards. Even on a bright sunny day, at this point you can barely see shiat without the artificial lighting. Then they tell you about how many people died of tuberculosis right in that spot when that part of the cave system served as a makeshift tuberculosis ward, and how the dying people would grab new people and smell them "to smell the sunlight on their hair."

That was bad, but I brushed it off like "Well, now we have doctors and antibiotics." Then my stepmom's Peruvian mother died of tuberculosis a few years ago. She was in her mid-fifties. She had a treatable form, but was just too poor to pay for good medical care.

I knew people died of treatable stuff all the time all over the world, but I didn't quite get how bad we were talking until then.

You want to get really pissed about a curable disease.

Cholera.

The treatment is ~ your body weight in water.   They do tests on people where they give them Cholera because we can triviallyturn it from "most deadly disease ever" to "ate some really bad Mexican food". And we didn't figure any of this out until the 1800's.  OK then.


Germ theory is just one of those things that seems unbelievably obvious in hindsight. Like, your average five-year-old can easily grasp the whole concept, but it took the most dedicated, highly-educated researchers to actually think of it.

Sometimes I wonder what blatant science concepts we're missing now that, in two hundred years, people will mock us for. Then I get kind of sad.
 
2013-08-09 06:24:10 PM  
Another article: http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/08/09/3552628/legislators-may-debate- t b-testing.html

While 12 school employees were tested in mid-April, it wasn't until late May that parents were officially notified of the situation, and students and other faculty were tested for the disease. Templeton apologized again to senators for mistakes that left residents of the town of just 2,000 people in the dark while rumors circulated.
More than 100 people, including more than 50 children, tested positive for germs associated with the airborne disease. The vast majority of those show no symptoms. The 12 who developed active tuberculosis disease include the janitor - whom Templeton ordered quarantined when he wouldn't stay home - and 10 children who are not contagious. The Department of Health and Environmental Control is paying for the treatment of those 12.



Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/08/09/3552628/legislators-may-debate- t b-testing.html#storylink=cpy
Hoooooly-shiat. I hope your nephew ends up okay, subby. *hugs*
 
2013-08-09 06:36:06 PM  

Vector R: That article was long and exceptionally confusing. In summation, janitor tested positive for TB on Match 8th and told not to come back. Another staffer did too, and finished out the school year, but it's unclear whether they knew. Somehow, 100 people in the school have now tested positive, 53 of them kids, and 10 of those kids have TB now. Those people's lives have now changed forever for the worse, and they deserve aaaaaall the monies. This is a really horrible showing of ass-covering administration in action.


Not only that, but the school district violated state law by not requiring the janitor get tested for TB before he started working at the school. This whole thing could have been avoided if they just did what they were supposed to do. That's what infuriates me. Subby, I hope your nephew gets better soon... along with all of the other kids out there.
 
2013-08-09 06:41:11 PM  

Chinchillazilla: meyerkev: Chinchillazilla: One of the spookier experiences of my life was visiting Mammoth Cave. You walk in the cave about a hundred yards. Even on a bright sunny day, at this point you can barely see shiat without the artificial lighting. Then they tell you about how many people died of tuberculosis right in that spot when that part of the cave system served as a makeshift tuberculosis ward, and how the dying people would grab new people and smell them "to smell the sunlight on their hair."

That was bad, but I brushed it off like "Well, now we have doctors and antibiotics." Then my stepmom's Peruvian mother died of tuberculosis a few years ago. She was in her mid-fifties. She had a treatable form, but was just too poor to pay for good medical care.

I knew people died of treatable stuff all the time all over the world, but I didn't quite get how bad we were talking until then.

You want to get really pissed about a curable disease.

Cholera.

The treatment is ~ your body weight in water.   They do tests on people where they give them Cholera because we can triviallyturn it from "most deadly disease ever" to "ate some really bad Mexican food". And we didn't figure any of this out until the 1800's.  OK then.

Germ theory is just one of those things that seems unbelievably obvious in hindsight. Like, your average five-year-old can easily grasp the whole concept, but it took the most dedicated, highly-educated researchers to actually think of it.

Sometimes I wonder what blatant science concepts we're missing now that, in two hundred years, people will mock us for. Then I get kind of sad.


There's a book on the subject of gerrm theory:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ghost_Map.

Short version is that for thousands and thousands of years:  This smells -> It kills you.  It doesn't smell -> It probably won't kill you.   So they spent a BUNCH of time and money making things not smell, and we had millions of years of evolution going: It smells -> It kills you.

What they missed was:  It smells -> because it's literally rotting meat covered in bacteria -> It kills you.  The smells didn't kill you, the bacteria did.  The smell had just been a really good proxy.So when they tried to make things not smell (by, among other things, dumping raw sewage into the Thames upriver of where half of London got their drinking water from), they sent germs all over the place.  And that killed people.
 
2013-08-09 06:43:53 PM  
Vector R:
Hoooooly-shiat. I hope your nephew ends up okay, subby. *hugs*

Thanks!  He's got pluck/moxie/whatever it was they used to say about someone with a lot of spirit, and he's in a loving household with supportive parents and siblings.

What stuns me is that before my sister and brother in law brought him back from China, he actually got the BCG vaccine, which is supposed to be 80% effective.  I guess someone has to be in the 20%, but you always hope it's "someone else".
 
2013-08-09 07:41:39 PM  

hardinparamedic: Are people in a school required to get a yearly TB Skin test?


Well, by the looks of it, SC probably should start requiring the test.  I recall a TB scare when I was attending a SC hs.  A teacher caught it and all her students were taken out of school till they tested negative.  I think she returned the following year.  I didn't have her class, but if I recall correctly she taught Spanish.  I remember being nervous that it could've spread through out the school, but it was caught early enough with no affected students.  Then again, I didn't attend some small town school like the one in the story.
 
2013-08-09 08:36:07 PM  

gar1013: Vector R:
Hoooooly-shiat. I hope your nephew ends up okay, subby. *hugs*

Thanks!  He's got pluck/moxie/whatever it was they used to say about someone with a lot of spirit, and he's in a loving household with supportive parents and siblings.

What stuns me is that before my sister and brother in law brought him back from China, he actually got the BCG vaccine, which is supposed to be 80% effective.  I guess someone has to be in the 20%, but you always hope it's "someone else".


BCG isn't effective at stopping preventing TB infections, it just reduces the fatality rate of infant/childhood TB.

http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/epidemiology/DiseasePrevention/Programs/ Tu berculosis/ContactInvestigations/BCGGuidelines.htm
 
2013-08-10 12:26:02 AM  
I'm calling BS on Subbys green approved headline. No such quote is in that article!
I think it should be manditory, that if a link is submitted with a quote in the headline. That the Admins should have to open the article, actually read it and confirm that the quote is accurate.
 
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