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(Economist)   Overfishing has created scarcity in the high-end niche market for wild-caught fish. Which might lead to overfishing   (economist.com) divider line 16
    More: Interesting, farmed fish, fish oils, price indexes  
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734 clicks; posted to Business » on 09 Aug 2013 at 1:19 PM (48 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-09 01:24:14 PM
Line caught beef?


cdn.static-economist.com
 
2013-08-09 01:27:44 PM

jtotheroc: Line caught beef?



Yes!

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Cow%20fishing">http:/ /www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Cow%20fishing
 
2013-08-09 01:49:40 PM
I've always enjoyed fishing. It is startling, though, how things have changed in the last 30 years. When I was a kid, we'd go deep sea fishing (Florida Gulf of Mexico), and come home loaded down with red snapper, grouper, flounder, triggerfish, and more vermillion snapper than you could handle. On a four hour trip. In the last few years, I've taken day-long trips in the same places, and MAYBE one person would catch a single red snapper (which now have strict, short seasons), and we might catch a few undersized grouper.

Fish populations have seriously declined. I'm sure there are plently of reasons for this, including the freewheeling days of catching and keeping everything, which I enjoyed as a kid. You would be hard-pressed to find anything but the most abundant, and mostly farmed species on menus these days. (i.e. Red Lobster offering Tillapia, Atlantic Salmon, Rainbow Trout, and Catfish as their fresh [farmed] fish options. Really?).

If you want good fish these days, you have to catch it yourself. That doesn't bother me, too much.
 
2013-08-09 02:11:20 PM
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com

Don't worry, the oceans bounty will always be there for us.
 
2013-08-09 02:23:18 PM

beezeltown: I've always enjoyed fishing. It is startling, though, how things have changed in the last 30 years. When I was a kid, we'd go deep sea fishing (Florida Gulf of Mexico), and come home loaded down with red snapper, grouper, flounder, triggerfish, and more vermillion snapper than you could handle. On a four hour trip. In the last few years, I've taken day-long trips in the same places, and MAYBE one person would catch a single red snapper (which now have strict, short seasons), and we might catch a few undersized grouper.

Fish populations have seriously declined. I'm sure there are plently of reasons for this, including the freewheeling days of catching and keeping everything, which I enjoyed as a kid. You would be hard-pressed to find anything but the most abundant, and mostly farmed species on menus these days. (i.e. Red Lobster offering Tillapia, Atlantic Salmon, Rainbow Trout, and Catfish as their fresh [farmed] fish options. Really?).

If you want good fish these days, you have to catch it yourself. That doesn't bother me, too much.


If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the problem (Charles Rosner)
 
2013-08-09 03:04:26 PM

AMonkey'sUncle: beezeltown: I've always enjoyed fishing. It is startling, though, how things have changed in the last 30 years. When I was a kid, we'd go deep sea fishing (Florida Gulf of Mexico), and come home loaded down with red snapper, grouper, flounder, triggerfish, and more vermillion snapper than you could handle. On a four hour trip. In the last few years, I've taken day-long trips in the same places, and MAYBE one person would catch a single red snapper (which now have strict, short seasons), and we might catch a few undersized grouper.

Fish populations have seriously declined. I'm sure there are plently of reasons for this, including the freewheeling days of catching and keeping everything, which I enjoyed as a kid. You would be hard-pressed to find anything but the most abundant, and mostly farmed species on menus these days. (i.e. Red Lobster offering Tillapia, Atlantic Salmon, Rainbow Trout, and Catfish as their fresh [farmed] fish options. Really?).

If you want good fish these days, you have to catch it yourself. That doesn't bother me, too much.

If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the problem (Charles Rosner)


Your joking right? Line and spear fishing has an infinitesimally small impact on wild populations. The problem is all the farking drag net fisherman who are farking up the reefs and over fishing 24/7. If you're buying fish from a super market, you're the problem.
 
2013-08-09 03:25:02 PM
I'm not saying Global Warming... but; something is bleaching out reefs and decimating fish populations.  So yeah, not Global Warming, but just the acidification and overall temperature increases in our seas and all the nitrate and CO2 we are pumping into a previously balanced system.  Nothing to be alarmed about... nope.
 
2013-08-09 03:33:59 PM

karmaceutical: I'm not saying Global Warming... but; something is bleaching out reefs and decimating fish populations.  So yeah, not Global Warming, but just the acidification and overall temperature increases in our seas and all the nitrate and CO2 we are pumping into a previously balanced system.  Nothing to be alarmed about... nope.


That's not really global warming. The CO2 is absorbed by the sea which increases its acidity through the formation of carbonic acid. Those are two distinct problems that happen to result from the same source.
 
2013-08-09 03:50:20 PM

karmaceutical: I'm not saying Global Warming... but; something is bleaching out reefs and decimating fish populations.  So yeah, not Global Warming, but just the acidification and overall temperature increases in our seas and all the nitrate and CO2 we are pumping into a previously balanced system.  Nothing to be alarmed about... nope.


JOB KILLER!
 
2013-08-09 03:55:46 PM

skozlaw: karmaceutical: I'm not saying Global Warming... but; something is bleaching out reefs and decimating fish populations.  So yeah, not Global Warming, but just the acidification and overall temperature increases in our seas and all the nitrate and CO2 we are pumping into a previously balanced system.  Nothing to be alarmed about... nope.

That's not really global warming. The CO2 is absorbed by the sea which increases its acidity through the formation of carbonic acid. Those are two distinct problems that happen to result from the same source.


so unrelated but directly proportional??
 
2013-08-09 04:00:00 PM

Ego edo infantia cattus: AMonkey'sUncle: beezeltown: I've always enjoyed fishing. It is startling, though, how things have changed in the last 30 years. When I was a kid, we'd go deep sea fishing (Florida Gulf of Mexico), and come home loaded down with red snapper, grouper, flounder, triggerfish, and more vermillion snapper than you could handle. On a four hour trip. In the last few years, I've taken day-long trips in the same places, and MAYBE one person would catch a single red snapper (which now have strict, short seasons), and we might catch a few undersized grouper.

Fish populations have seriously declined. I'm sure there are plently of reasons for this, including the freewheeling days of catching and keeping everything, which I enjoyed as a kid. You would be hard-pressed to find anything but the most abundant, and mostly farmed species on menus these days. (i.e. Red Lobster offering Tillapia, Atlantic Salmon, Rainbow Trout, and Catfish as their fresh [farmed] fish options. Really?).

If you want good fish these days, you have to catch it yourself. That doesn't bother me, too much.

If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the problem (Charles Rosner)

Your joking right? Line and spear fishing has an infinitesimally small impact on wild populations. The problem is all the farking drag net fisherman who are farking up the reefs and over fishing 24/7. If you're buying fish from a super market, you're the problem.


While sportfishing has had some kind of impact, the trawlers, mega-longliners, and the factory ships in general are the ones sieving as much biomass out of the sea as they possibly can.

As mentioned in TFA, farmed fish generally need fish meal (the saltwater varieties, in particular). This requires massive ships hauling tons of menhaden, anchovies, sardines, and other "bait" species day in and day out, all over the world, to be ground into paste and dried for meal. So, your little 3.5 oz serving of farmed salmon at Applesleaze required about a pound of schooling pelagic baitfish to produce. This activity is causing a collapse in baitfish stocks worldwide, which affects all sorts of larger-sized-fish populations.

Recreational anglers, like me, generally follow established limits and seasons, allowing for wild stocks to thrive. I'm perfectly fine with this; I want to have these resources available when I'm old. It's also easier for me to target non-commercial/less commercial species that are outstanding for eating (pompano, sea trout and whiting in the surf; red-eared sunfish, rainbow trout, rock bass, crappie in creeks and lakes). And after I wrestle with various big game species (sharks, redfish in saltwater/largemouth & smallmouth bass in fresh water) I let them go.

I don't feel like I'm part of the problem. I consciously work to fish in a way that supports sustainable management practices. I buy line-caught salmon sometimes, and mahi filets (mahi mahi is a very fast-growing topwater pelagic fish with solid and sustained populations, which happens to be incredibly fun to catch as well).
 
2013-08-09 04:10:13 PM

beezeltown: don't feel like I'm part of the problem. I consciously work to fish in a way that supports sustainable management practices. I buy line-caught salmon sometimes, and mahi filets (mahi mahi is a very fast-growing topwater pelagic fish with solid and sustained populations, which happens to be incredibly fun to catch as well).


Here in Central Idaho, we actually started to have a King Salmon season again since being shut down in 1975 because of the healthy runs.  Not everything is crashing and it is great to have wild* salmon on the menu again.

*wild meaning hatchery reared to smolt phase as true wild salmon are listed under the Endangered Species Act as 'Threatened" and have to be released.
 
2013-08-10 04:14:59 AM
Don't buy farmed fish. If you want fish go catch one yourself. Lazy sons of biatches.
 
2013-08-10 04:29:52 AM
This is why I stopped eating fish altogether. Probably every commercial fish is overfished. Even the ones that "aren't" almost certainly are and their populations have no doubt fallen by half since 1900 (the others have fallen by numbers like 80-90% since 1990, like the sharks that china ate).

Ban trawling, purse seines, and dredging. Maybe long lines too. Then get all the farking fertilizer out of the rivers. And put 30% of all the ocean, shoreline and offshore, completely off limits to ANY extractive activity, including recreational fishing. Then MAYBE we would see things start to turn around...
 
2013-08-10 07:58:52 AM
Lots of the folks that grew up here in Florida tell stories of going out in the GOM and catching cooler after cooler of fish and bringing it in, before the state set limits. It would go home to the freezer or folks would be waiting at the dock to purchase it. Stories of folks bringing in 500# at a time were not uncommon.

Now days, here in Florida, most restaurants sell tilapia or their fish comes from China. Wonder where all the domestic fish goes?
 
2013-08-10 10:02:31 AM
2.bp.blogspot.com
Is not handling the news well.
 
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