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(Fox News)   Fox News flips out that Matt Damon sends his kids to private school   (foxnews.com ) divider line
    More: Obvious, Matt Damon, Fox News, private schools, Hannah, Sean Hannity  
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3088 clicks; posted to Politics » on 09 Aug 2013 at 8:21 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-09 11:19:26 AM  

padraig: Arkanaut: I hate to admit it, but I think Fox has a point -- if he's sending his kids to private school, Matt Damon doesn't have a stake in the quality of public schools anymore.

White people did not have a stake in the civil rights of black people, that did not prevent some white people to be active in the civil right fight.


Fair enough.  But a lot of them put themselves at risk to advocate for those rights -- the Freedom Riders, for example.
 
2013-08-09 11:19:29 AM  

t3knomanser: cenobyte40k: He is not telling people they must use public schools and then he doesn't. He is telling people that we should support better public education, which he does, but doesn't think it's good enough yet, so he sends his kids to private school.

And, in so doing, he is improving the public school system- he contributes taxes to the system but doesn't consume its resources (directly).


The problem is, rather than working to make his public school better he left.  Assuming his kids aren't half stupid, removing them from the public school hurts the overall student population.  One of the best ways that disadvantaged people can improve themselves is to be able to associate with and emulate more advantaged people.  If all the people of advantage leave, then the disadvantaged have no one in their immediate sphere of influence to emulate.
 
2013-08-09 11:20:15 AM  
www.theculturednerd.com

Public school is for poor people.  Why should I send my kids there?
 
2013-08-09 11:22:57 AM  
Then I must be the biggest hypocrite ever too. I'm a really strong supporter of keeping religion and prayers out of public schools. Guess what? My kids go to a Catholic School.
 
2013-08-09 11:24:09 AM  

skozlaw: Zeb Hesselgresser: And you and jiro is right you can't eradicate poverty, but we've certainly given it a good beating.

That's only true in relation to other, unlike nations.

By the OECD's measure of poverty (the line being (l)ess than half the median income, which, by household, corresponds closely to how the U.S. also defines poverty), we have the fourth highest poverty rate among the thirty three OECD nations.


Doesn't tying the measure of poverty to median income make it unlikely that we will ever win the WOP?
 
2013-08-09 11:25:13 AM  
He loves talking them up, but doesn't want to send his kids there.
You know, he said he didn't have a choice. He had to do it. Actually he did have a choice. The people who don't have a choice are the rest of Americans who don't have Matt Damon's bank account and can't afford to send their kids to a private school.

 And there you have it: According to Damon, public schools are good enough for thee, but not for me. Why isn't he just honest about it, though?
 
2013-08-09 11:28:46 AM  
Hell, I send MY kid to private school. But that's just because the public schools in Peoria are shiat.
 
2013-08-09 11:29:07 AM  

skozlaw: Zeb Hesselgresser: And you and jiro is right you can't eradicate poverty, but we've certainly given it a good beating.

That's only true in relation to other, unlike nations.

By the OECD's measure of poverty (the line being ess than half the median income, which, by household, corresponds closely to how the U.S. also defines poverty), we have the fourth highest poverty rate among the thirty three OECD nations.


Of the median income of that country. Which means we have a wider distribution of wealth, not necessarily that we have more poor, or our poor are worse off.

Using 1/2 of median income is a somewhat arbitrary definition. A nation comprised of 1% oligarchs and 99% subsistence plebes (who each have the same miserable income) would have no poverty under that rationale.
 
2013-08-09 11:30:24 AM  
"Fox News flips out when [famous liberal] does [any action]"

Pretty much sums it up
 
2013-08-09 11:30:25 AM  

Rwa2play: Debeo Summa Credo: Yeah, have to agree with libs on this one. Couldn't someone say "our public schools suck, therefore Im forced to send my kids to private school?" without being a hypocrite?

Almost every upper middle class or higher white liberal in manhattan sends their kids to private school.

Also: Every elite conservative.


Right, and they aren't hypocrites either.
 
2013-08-09 11:30:29 AM  
Only an ignorant anti-education conservative would think the statements:

"We need to improve public schools", and
"I'm sending my kids to a private school because the public ones aren't up to snuff"

are mutually incompatable.
 
2013-08-09 11:32:05 AM  

Ivandrago: I find this confusing. You can't be an advocate of public schools if you send your kids to private schools? I'm an advocate of strong public schools, but I went to a private high school. Does that make me a hypocrite? Why does wanting everyone to get a good education regardless of wealth make me a hypocrite?


He also released a statement that, in essence, said that he and his wife just couldn't find a public school that offered the same educational values that they grew up with. Also, it's that reason why he's a public school advocate to begin with. So yeah, I don't see the hypocrisy in this decision at all.
 
2013-08-09 11:36:13 AM  

Headso: IrateShadow: the school is free to expel problem students.

A friend of my wife had a little boy that was a douchebag they sent him to private school in 1st grade and by the second week he was kicked out of school. The freedom to kick out problem kids is a huuuuge advantage that makes the two types of schools incomparable.


Very good point. Private schools look better because they have better raw materials (students), and a key factor in that is that they can reject students that cause problems.
 
2013-08-09 11:36:36 AM  

soupafi: I don't have kids yet but I will be sending them to private schools. But I always vote yes on school tax levies because public schools need help. Am I a bad person?


It depends.  Do you oppose policies that would allow parents who can't afford private schools on their own to have at least some choice on where their kids go?  Do you reflexively oppose all efforts to measure and incentivize teacher quality?
 
2013-08-09 11:39:00 AM  

Hickory-smoked: Dancin_In_Anson: clkeagle: ...I assume the outrage is that Matt Damon isn't demanding a taxpayer-funded voucher to cover their private tuition?

No, he won life's lottery and can afford things that the shrinking middle class and lower classes can't. Probably takes advantage of all kinds of tax loopholes in order to keep from paying his fair share too.

So, I guess you agree that such loopholes should be closed?


Depends what "loopholes" you're talking about.  I'd be all for abolishing all deductions and credits other than personal exemptions, rolling SS & Medicare taxes into the income tax and adjusting rates accordingly.
 
2013-08-09 11:39:27 AM  

the opposite of charity is justice: MattStafford: The argument that many libertarians would make is that it would be idiotic not to take advantage of a service that you are paying for.  Basically - I disagree with this whole process, but unfortunately I pay taxes to fund the school, so I can avail myself of its use if I want to.

Ah. the good ole' Rand-ian Social Security Manuever.


But when, say, Warren Buffet or George Soros says taxes should be higher on the rich, those same people will say, "then why don't those guys just send more money to the government".
 
2013-08-09 11:43:38 AM  
So he wants better public schools for other people even though he would not directly benefit from it.

STRING HIM UP!!
 
2013-08-09 11:46:36 AM  

Corvus: So he wants better public schools for other people even though he would not directly benefit from it.

STRING HIM UP!!


Maybe he likes the idea of them being better, but he actively works to prevent the types of reforms that would improve them.
 
2013-08-09 11:48:14 AM  

Ctrl-Alt-Del: "Lib Media flips out when [famous conservative] does [any action]"


Same same
 
2013-08-09 11:52:40 AM  
He's just butthurt because Obama dumped him. I guess Barry is farking Jimmy Kimmel now
 
2013-08-09 11:59:37 AM  

vonster: Ctrl-Alt-Del: "Lib Media flips out when [famous conservative] does [any action]"

Same same


The herp is strong with this derp.
 
2013-08-09 12:01:01 PM  

BMFPitt: Corvus: So he wants better public schools for other people even though he would not directly benefit from it.

STRING HIM UP!!

Maybe he likes the idea of them being better, but he actively works to prevent the types of reforms that would improve them.


Reforms such as what?
 
2013-08-09 12:03:37 PM  
I'm a hypocrite about all sorts of things. Most every person I know is, in one way or another. Fine with me, I'm rarely consistent in my thoughts throughout the day, so what? I don't care. Calling me a hypocrite won't hurt my feelings because it's not an insult. It's who we are as human beings.
 
2013-08-09 12:05:32 PM  

Karac: BMFPitt: Corvus: So he wants better public schools for other people even though he would not directly benefit from it.

STRING HIM UP!!

Maybe he likes the idea of them being better, but he actively works to prevent the types of reforms that would improve them.

Reforms such as what?


School choice, school competition, merit pay, parent triggers, etc.
 
2013-08-09 12:06:39 PM  
It's my b-day today, and I've chosen to see Elysium tonight and I can't wait.
 
2013-08-09 12:08:07 PM  

Confabulat: I'm a hypocrite about all sorts of things. Most every person I know is, in one way or another. Fine with me, I'm rarely consistent in my thoughts throughout the day, so what? I don't care. Calling me a hypocrite won't hurt my feelings because it's not an insult. It's who we are as human beings.


Well that's one way to go. Another way is to consider why you hold two conflicting views and decide which one is correct.
 
2013-08-09 12:12:10 PM  

BMFPitt: Another way is to consider why you hold two conflicting views and decide which one is correct.


I can watch the same movie two times and have two completely different opinions of it. That's just how stuff is. There's no test at the end anyway, so why worry about being consistent?
 
2013-08-09 12:13:06 PM  

BMFPitt: Karac: BMFPitt: Corvus: So he wants better public schools for other people even though he would not directly benefit from it.

STRING HIM UP!!

Maybe he likes the idea of them being better, but he actively works to prevent the types of reforms that would improve them.

Reforms such as what?

School choice, school competition, merit pay, parent triggers, etc.


In South Carolina at least school choice is a thinly - very thinly - veiled cover for saying "I want a tax break to send my kids to the private school I'm already sending them too."  In Louisiana, it's a thin cover for saying "We'd like to siphon tax dollars away from public schools to private religious schools that teach creationism by VHS players in cubicles".

As for merit pay, here's a short list of things which contribute to how well a student does in class:
how good the teacher is
how good last years teacher was
how much the parents help out at home
how much the parents are able to help out at home, and how much time they spend working two jobs
whether the kid got a good nights sleep
whether the kid got a decent meal
how good their neighborhood is - how much local tax dollars are able to be spent on the school district

In short, there's a very large amount of factors - if not the majority of factors - which go into how well a child learns that are COMPLETELY out of the control of the teacher.  And if it's out of their hands why should their pay be docked for it?
 
2013-08-09 12:13:35 PM  
download.lardlad.com


First you didn't want me to get the pony, now you want me to take it back-make up your mind!
 
2013-08-09 12:22:00 PM  
What watching Sean Hannity's show reminds me of:

jasonrivera.com
 
2013-08-09 12:24:22 PM  

Confabulat: I'm a hypocrite about all sorts of things. Most every person I know is, in one way or another. Fine with me, I'm rarely consistent in my thoughts throughout the day, so what? I don't care. Calling me a hypocrite won't hurt my feelings because it's not an insult. It's who we are as human beings.


lol if you think there is any hypocrisy here
 
2013-08-09 12:26:14 PM  

cenobyte40k: Supporting the improvement of something that you don't use doesn't make you a hypocrite. Honestly that word isn't that complicated. He is not telling people they must use public schools and then he doesn't. He is telling people that we should support better public education, which he does, but doesn't think it's good enough yet, so he sends his kids to private school. Wanted public school to good and not thinking it's good yet is not hypocritical. This is just reaching idiotic hyperbowl hoping to undermine their 'enemies' position.


Yes this.... I spent 20 minutes trying to organize my thoughts you pretty much nailed it on the nose
 
2013-08-09 12:28:23 PM  

Ivandrago: I wouldn't trade my crappy public middle school experience for anything. It may have been bad, but it was fun as hell at the time.


I can honestly say this is the first time I've heard someone say middle school was fun.  As I recall, my middle school was full of loud, obnoxious preteens with nasty dispositions whose only agenda was to publicly ridicule the less popular kids.  Also, rampant bullying with not one single administrator giving a rat's ass that many of the smaller kids were near suicidal from the constant abuse.  In addition, an abundance of decprepit, hateful old hags for teachers that psychologically abused students with joy.  And lastly, a policy of corporal punishment that was downright terrifying.

And as the dialogue goes: "You were either a bully, a toady, or one of the nameless rabble of victims."
 
2013-08-09 12:30:11 PM  

Karac: As for merit pay, here's a short list of things which contribute to how well a student does in class:
how good the teacher is
how good last years teacher was
how much the parents help out at home
how much the parents are able to help out at home, and how much time they spend working two jobs
whether the kid got a good nights sleep
whether the kid got a decent meal
how good their neighborhood is - how much local tax dollars are able to be spent on the school district

In short, there's a very large amount of factors - if not the majority of factors - which go into how well a child learns that are COMPLETELY out of the control of the teacher. And if it's out of their hands why should their pay be docked for it?


Merit pay addresses the top two elements on your list.  It give teachers a financial incentive to make sure the kids in their class do well.

The "it doesn't do everything so we shouldn't do it at all" argument isn't very helpful.
 
2013-08-09 12:34:42 PM  

KatjaMouse: Ivandrago: I find this confusing. You can't be an advocate of public schools if you send your kids to private schools? I'm an advocate of strong public schools, but I went to a private high school. Does that make me a hypocrite? Why does wanting everyone to get a good education regardless of wealth make me a hypocrite?

He also released a statement that, in essence, said that he and his wife just couldn't find a public school that offered the same educational values that they grew up with. Also, it's that reason why he's a public school advocate to begin with. So yeah, I don't see the hypocrisy in this decision at all.


That's because there isn't any. People who think this is hypocritical are morons.
 
2013-08-09 12:36:51 PM  

Mr. Eugenides: Karac: As for merit pay, here's a short list of things which contribute to how well a student does in class:
how good the teacher is
how good last years teacher was
how much the parents help out at home
how much the parents are able to help out at home, and how much time they spend working two jobs
whether the kid got a good nights sleep
whether the kid got a decent meal
how good their neighborhood is - how much local tax dollars are able to be spent on the school district

In short, there's a very large amount of factors - if not the majority of factors - which go into how well a child learns that are COMPLETELY out of the control of the teacher. And if it's out of their hands why should their pay be docked for it?

Merit pay addresses the top two elements on your list.  It give teachers a financial incentive to make sure the kids in their class do well.

The "it doesn't do everything so we shouldn't do it at all" argument isn't very helpful.


That is why I feel justified in punching that little punk paperboy. The news that he delivers is very depressing. Sure, my approach doesn't solve all of the factors that contribute to the shiatty news, but few solutions are perfect.
 
2013-08-09 12:41:16 PM  

Ivandrago: I find this confusing. You can't be an advocate of public schools if you send your kids to private schools? I'm an advocate of strong public schools, but I went to a private high school. Does that make me a hypocrite? Why does wanting everyone to get a good education regardless of wealth make me a hypocrite?


The answer is "yes" if you're against vouchers.  If you send your kids to private school and don't want to allow vouchers so other parents can make the decision to either send their kids to public or private school ... then you are a hypocrite.
 
2013-08-09 12:41:41 PM  

LlamaGirl: MAAAAAAAAAAAATT DAAAAMOOOON


You know, I heard that when Matt Damon saw that movie, he was kind of upset... that they didn't contact him to do the voice.  He thought the character was hilarious.
 
2013-08-09 12:43:06 PM  

vonster: Ctrl-Alt-Del: "Lib Media flips out when [famous conservative] does [any action]"

Same same


media.animevice.com
 
2013-08-09 12:44:08 PM  

theknuckler_33: FIELDS: He loves talking them up, but doesn't want to send his kids there.
You know, he said he didn't have a choice. He had to do it. Actually he did have a choice. The people who don't have a choice are the rest of Americans who don't have Matt Damon's bank account and can't afford to send their kids to a private school.
...
HANNITY: She's brining up a point you're ignoring. Why not give every American a choice?

You heard it here first, America. Sean Hannity advocating giving every American the money they need to send their kids to private schools.


Nope.  Hannity is advocating giving every American child back the money the government intends to spend on their schooling and letting their parents choose whether to spend it on public schooling or private schooling.  Big difference (which, of course, you were aware of when you typed out your troll post).
 
2013-08-09 12:45:04 PM  

Confabulat: BMFPitt: Another way is to consider why you hold two conflicting views and decide which one is correct.

I can watch the same movie two times and have two completely different opinions of it. That's just how stuff is. There's no test at the end anyway, so why worry about being consistent?


So you don't know the difference between hypocrisy and changing your mind?
 
2013-08-09 12:45:41 PM  

SunsetLament: Nope. Hannity is advocating giving every American child back the money the government intends to spend on their schooling and letting their parents choose whether to spend it on public schooling or private schooling

American madrassas.
 
2013-08-09 12:47:15 PM  

Ivandrago: I find this confusing. You can't be an advocate of public schools if you send your kids to private schools? I'm an advocate of strong public schools, but I went to a private high school. Does that make me a hypocrite? Why does wanting everyone to get a good education regardless of wealth make me a hypocrite?


You want things that aren't for yourself?  That's unpossible.  I call hypocrite!
 
2013-08-09 12:49:24 PM  

ristst: Ivandrago: I wouldn't trade my crappy public middle school experience for anything. It may have been bad, but it was fun as hell at the time.

I can honestly say this is the first time I've heard someone say middle school was fun.  As I recall, my middle school was full of loud, obnoxious preteens with nasty dispositions whose only agenda was to publicly ridicule the less popular kids.  Also, rampant bullying with not one single administrator giving a rat's ass that many of the smaller kids were near suicidal from the constant abuse.  In addition, an abundance of decprepit, hateful old hags for teachers that psychologically abused students with joy.  And lastly, a policy of corporal punishment that was downright terrifying.

And as the dialogue goes: "You were either a bully, a toady, or one of the nameless rabble of victims."


My middle school was fun because even though I was certainly one of the nameless rabble of victims, when I wasn't being victimized, I was basically free to do whatever I wanted to. I met the three people I would consider my closest friends there. I had one or two teachers that cared and that was enough. I never did homework, I never studied for tests, I could skip class whenever I wanted to and no one noticed. I got beaten up, publicly humiliated a few times, but aside from those times it was ok. When it was just my friends and I playing Magic in the lunchroom because we skipped class, or riding my friend's bus home so I could play D&D at his house (caught abuse from some kids for that because "I didn't belong on that bus"), watching the tough kids fight, and the lunchroom had the most amazing pretzels I've ever had in my life made it ok in hindsight.
 
2013-08-09 12:53:53 PM  

SunsetLament: If you send your kids to private school and don't want to allow vouchers so other parents can make the decision to either send their kids to public or private school ... then you are a hypocrite.


Go figure - rich people can afford to buy nicer things for themselves and their kids than the equivalent things that poor people get from the government? Why do you hate capitalism, comrade?
 
2013-08-09 12:56:00 PM  
BMFPitt:

Reforms such as what?

School choice, school competition, merit pay, parent triggers, etc.


None of which work.  Even NRO wrote an article the other day how school choice doesn't work.  Of course, they promised if only we spent MORE money on it it would.  If we want a system that works, we should emulate Finland the best system in the world.  However, the current crop of school reformers seem more keen on emulating Somalia.
 
2013-08-09 12:56:24 PM  

Mr. Eugenides: Karac: As for merit pay, here's a short list of things which contribute to how well a student does in class:
how good the teacher is
how good last years teacher was
how much the parents help out at home
how much the parents are able to help out at home, and how much time they spend working two jobs
whether the kid got a good nights sleep
whether the kid got a decent meal
how good their neighborhood is - how much local tax dollars are able to be spent on the school district

In short, there's a very large amount of factors - if not the majority of factors - which go into how well a child learns that are COMPLETELY out of the control of the teacher. And if it's out of their hands why should their pay be docked for it?

Merit pay addresses the top two elements on your list.  It give teachers a financial incentive to make sure the kids in their class do well.

The "it doesn't do everything so we shouldn't do it at all" argument isn't very helpful.


It's not that it doesn't do everything.  It's that it hardly does anything.
A much better option for improving public schools would be to end this outbreak of teacher bashing we've been on for a while.  If you want the quality of teachers to improve then you should:
- start promoting them as honorable and dignified professionals, instead of glorified day care workers out to mentally indoctrinate your children and bilk the taxpayers out of a humongous salary of 50K a year.
- start programs to actually help them out in classrooms.  Pair up experienced educators with new ones, or even with college students getting education degrees.  That'd decrease the workload on the senior teacher, and give the newbie actual hands-on training.

Basically, if you want better teachers, then stop promoting teaching as an evil occupation so the quality of your incoming pool goes up, and try actually helping the ones you've already got.
 
2013-08-09 12:58:38 PM  

Zeb Hesselgresser: Doesn't tying the measure of poverty to median income make it unlikely that we will ever win the WOP?


Only if you've got a situation with EXTREME weighting to one side.

Debeo Summa Credo: Which means we have a wider distribution of wealth


That is true.

Debeo Summa Credo: not necessarily that we have more poor


Wealth is relative to the people you use for comparison. Your statement, though, is only true if you use people in places unlike the U.S. as your basis for comparison. Which is to say that our poor are only average or wealthy relative to people in Haiti if they actually move to Haiti and the economic force of Haiti apply to them. While they are here and living under the economic forces that affect the U.S., they are poor. The argument you put forward is a version of the laughably absurd "poor people have refrigerators" statistical. It doesn't matter if a man in Florida has a refrigerator while a man in Haiti doesn't eve have a roof. The man Florida is not neighbors with the man in Haiti, he is neighbors with the man next door, and if that man has a Rolls Royce, the man with the refrigerator is poor.

Debeo Summa Credo: A nation comprised of 1% oligarchs and 99% subsistence plebes (who each have the same miserable income) would have no poverty under that rationale.


If such a place existed it would make sense to alter the definition for such extreme and unusual circumstances. However, it would require such a drastically broken economic system that those measurement would be useless anyway because the underlying problems causing those numbers would need to be dealt with before any meaningful discussion on income levels could be had. That the number could be broken by hypothetical extremes does not inherently mean anything and, in fact, the measurements that the U.S. uses to actually set policy regarding poverty are constantly being tweaked, a reflection of the fact that differing circumstances must be taken into account to avoid over or under representing the number of affected individuals.

Regardless, the OECD measure tracks very closely to the internal U.S. measure. What they consider an impoverished household is almost spot-on with the poverty line the U.S. draws for a family of four.
 
2013-08-09 01:01:30 PM  

ltr77: BMFPitt:

Reforms such as what?

School choice, school competition, merit pay, parent triggers, etc.

None of which work.  Even NRO wrote an article the other day how school choice doesn't work.  Of course, they promised if only we spent MORE money on it it would.  If we want a system that works, we should emulate Finland the best system in the world.  However, the current crop of school reformers seem more keen on emulating Somalia.


True. I feel a prerequisite for this discussion is this book. It's by Diane Ratvitch who was an assistant secretary of education for H.W. Bush and Clinton. She was at that time an advocate of school choice, vouchers etc. However her research and experience lead to to write that book which explains why those movements are seriously damaging American schools.
 
2013-08-09 01:03:45 PM  
Karac: In South Carolina at least school choice is a thinly - very thinly - veiled cover for saying "I want a tax break to send my kids to the private school I'm already sending them too."

I'm fine with that.

In Louisiana, it's a thin cover for saying "We'd like to siphon tax dollars away from public schools to private religious schools that teach creationism by VHS players in cubicles".

And any place where such schools could find parents willing to send their kids there probably has the same thing going on in public schools right now. At least that would be cheaper for the taxpayers, leaving more money to fund actual good schools for the kids that have a chance.

As for merit pay, here's a short list of things which contribute to how well a student does in class:
...


And the list is much longer than that. And most of those are measurable directly or indirectly, and could be incorporated into a rating formula if they are found to be statistically significant.

In short, there's a very large amount of factors - if not the majority of factors - which go into how well a child learns that are COMPLETELY out of the control of the teacher. And if it's out of their hands why should their pay be docked for it?

I don't share your opinion that teachers are interchangeable cogs who are incapable of producing measurable results or demonstrating varying levels of skill to observers. I also can't comprehend why you call the giving of higher raises to some to be docking the pay of others.

That is why I feel justified in punching that little punk paperboy. The news that he delivers is very depressing. Sure, my approach doesn't solve all of the factors that contribute to the shiatty news, but few solutions are perfect.

You think that punching him solves some of the factors? Well given the rest of your logic, I'm not surprised.
 
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