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(New Scientist)   How to build your own personal internet. Step 1: Get tubes. Lots and lots of tubes   (newscientist.com) divider line 27
    More: Spiffy, transceivers, communications security, web servers, general hospital, tubes, Silk Road, Catalonia  
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2758 clicks; posted to Geek » on 08 Aug 2013 at 3:47 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



27 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-08-08 02:20:17 PM
"The Internet is not something that you just dump something on. It's not a big truck. It's a series of tubes. And if you don't understand, those tubes can be filled and if they are filled, when you put your message in, it gets in line and it's going to be delayed by anyone that puts into that tube enormous amounts of material."

Ted Stevens
 
2013-08-08 03:28:57 PM
And it requires a lot of experimentation to get it right, to make sure the tubes are working properly.  Again and again, you have to get your tubes tried.
 
2013-08-08 03:59:35 PM
Do people really find it hard to build their own computer network?  Hell, I did that all the time when I worked in a data center.
 
2013-08-08 04:01:31 PM
Soon the Meshnet Cabal will control all the data flow!
 
2013-08-08 04:03:44 PM
files-cdn.formspring.me

Yea, good luck with that.
 
2013-08-08 04:05:16 PM
What would be the new internet's porn?

You need a teaser to get people involved.
 
2013-08-08 04:10:50 PM
Approves

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-08-08 04:10:58 PM
Sorry guys, if the problem is government, the solution is not technology.
 
2013-08-08 04:13:00 PM
I'm not really sure how this is different or better than using encryption on the existing internet?

If anyone can connect - nothing will stop the government/NSA/Google/Hackers from connecting and monitoring everything that is available.  That means, they'll have to do all the same stuff we already have to do on the internet - namely - encrypt stuff.  Encryption is pretty well understood and all requires some 'hard' to solve math problems....

So why not just use the existing infrastructure and use encryption?
Make another Tor network but without exit nodes.....
 
2013-08-08 04:20:11 PM
phiffer.org

404 error
 
2013-08-08 04:46:22 PM

Bung_Howdy: "The Internet is not something that you just dump something on. It's not a big truck. It's a series of tubes. And if you don't understand, those tubes can be filled and if they are filled, when you put your message in, it gets in line and it's going to be delayed by anyone that puts into that tube enormous amounts of material."

Ted Stevens


This is, like, exactly what the internet is.
 
2013-08-08 04:47:52 PM

Fark_Guy_Rob: I'm not really sure how this is different or better than using encryption on the existing internet?

If anyone can connect - nothing will stop the government/NSA/Google/Hackers from connecting and monitoring everything that is available.  That means, they'll have to do all the same stuff we already have to do on the internet - namely - encrypt stuff.  Encryption is pretty well understood and all requires some 'hard' to solve math problems....

So why not just use the existing infrastructure and use encryption?
Make another Tor network but without exit nodes.....


That was covered in TFA...
 
2013-08-08 04:58:33 PM
Good luck with that guys.  As soon as it gets big enough the FCC will get interested in it then it will come under government scrutiny and, for better or for worse, the NSA will dip their dicks in it too.
 
2013-08-08 05:02:35 PM

darth_badger: [phiffer.org image 500x333]

404 error


No, it looks more like a 451 error to me
 
2013-08-08 05:17:24 PM
I thought all you had to do was get a Google Fibre connection and scream at them about changing their stance about net neutrality.
 
2013-08-08 05:18:41 PM

Dragonflew: I thought all you had to do was get a Google Fibre connection and scream at them about changing their stance about net neutrality.


Ah, I thought this was about starting your own ISP.
 
2013-08-08 05:51:04 PM
www.audiocircuit.com

Awesome, what's step 2?
 
2013-08-08 07:24:30 PM
I'm surprised we haven't seen more of a push for private networks that go beyond the typical office-style LAN (or WAN), if for no other reason than reducing spam, malware and other crap. A non-profit, community network that contains only webpages created by community members could be highly amusing.
 
2013-08-08 08:27:47 PM
Time to dust off the old WildCat software .... and order a bunch of land lines.
 
2013-08-08 09:01:22 PM
Sounds hard. Will there be free pizza?
 
2013-08-08 09:58:47 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: [www.audiocircuit.com image 333x250]

Awesome, what's step 2?


Step 2 is all cat videos and porn, I think.
 
2013-08-08 11:44:08 PM
Do hams still run packet internet?
 
2013-08-09 01:28:03 AM
No flaming allowed...
 
2013-08-09 01:57:03 AM

uber humper: [files-cdn.formspring.me image 500x723]

Yea, good luck with that.


HA! I'd forgotten about that guy!
 
2013-08-09 01:09:21 PM
Also need a bucket of 1s and 0s.
And keep the cable straight for faster speeds; 0s are smooth and can travel relatively well but those 1s have cornering difficulties.
 
2013-08-09 02:04:11 PM

timujin: Fark_Guy_Rob: I'm not really sure how this is different or better than using encryption on the existing internet?

If anyone can connect - nothing will stop the government/NSA/Google/Hackers from connecting and monitoring everything that is available.  That means, they'll have to do all the same stuff we already have to do on the internet - namely - encrypt stuff.  Encryption is pretty well understood and all requires some 'hard' to solve math problems....

So why not just use the existing infrastructure and use encryption?
Make another Tor network but without exit nodes.....

That was covered in TFA...


Maybe you could point me to where.  I read this:

In the US, people can generally already get online with relative ease, so meshnets there are less about facilitating access and more about security, privacy and net neutrality - the idea that ISPs should treat all traffic equally, and not charge more for certain types.

And all of that is addressed, more easily, with encryption on the existing infrastructure.

How does something like Tor not address security, privacy and net neutrality?
 
2013-08-09 02:17:51 PM

Fark_Guy_Rob: timujin: Fark_Guy_Rob: I'm not really sure how this is different or better than using encryption on the existing internet?

If anyone can connect - nothing will stop the government/NSA/Google/Hackers from connecting and monitoring everything that is available.  That means, they'll have to do all the same stuff we already have to do on the internet - namely - encrypt stuff.  Encryption is pretty well understood and all requires some 'hard' to solve math problems....

So why not just use the existing infrastructure and use encryption?
Make another Tor network but without exit nodes.....

That was covered in TFA...

Maybe you could point me to where.  I read this:

In the US, people can generally already get online with relative ease, so meshnets there are less about facilitating access and more about security, privacy and net neutrality - the idea that ISPs should treat all traffic equally, and not charge more for certain types.

And all of that is addressed, more easily, with encryption on the existing infrastructure.

How does something like Tor not address security, privacy and net neutrality?


The article talks about Hyperboria, which runs on the existing infrastructure and provides encrypted peer-to-peer connectivity.
 
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