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(Guardian)   500 "new" fairy tales discovered in Germany. Disney corporation stocks rocket on news of new mother lode of Public Domain property to exploit mercilessly   (theguardian.com) divider line 71
    More: Cool, public domain, sprouting  
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6517 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Aug 2013 at 2:06 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-08 03:21:23 PM  

Elzar: [www.serenitystreetnews.com image 850x870]


what am I looking at?
 
2013-08-08 03:24:56 PM  
As someone who studies fairytale, folklore, and legends from the German and Nordic areas, I find this very exciting.
 
2013-08-08 03:26:08 PM  

unexplained bacon: Elzar: [www.serenitystreetnews.com image 850x870]

what am I looking at?


Irrefutable proof of Walt Disney being such an anti-Semite that he had Hitler's ear fished from the ashes of his bunker and surgically attached to his head. That way he could use some of Adolf's ability to hear what he could Nazi.
 
2013-08-08 03:26:44 PM  
Disney wants to exploit more public domain material so they stomp out this public domain curse once and for all.

(The lawyers actually claimed that no material should ever go without having an owner.)
 
2013-08-08 03:29:03 PM  

unexplained bacon: Elzar: [www.serenitystreetnews.com image 850x870]

what am I looking at?


Hitler and Walt Disney gave their left ears in a pact with the Lords of Chaos, in order to gain power over Melniboné.  DUH!  Isn't it obvious?
 
2013-08-08 03:41:18 PM  
I can't wait for the full translations to come out. Especially since they were written down exactly as heard. You can't ask for a more unique time capsule than that.
 
2013-08-08 03:51:25 PM  

MBooda: /ah, fond memories of a grisly german childhood


Hahahaha. My brother-in-law came up with a children's book that was kinda bleak and had simply awful doggerel for text. He asked me for a critique, and it came out that he'd been inspired by "Max und Moritz" and "The Katzenjammer Kids". When I was gently trying to break it to him that it wasn't going to be an instant hit on the eBook market, he mentioned that the main character died in the original version, so this version should be A-OK.
 
2013-08-08 04:01:53 PM  

netringer: Disney wants to exploit more public domain material so they stomp out this public domain curse once and for all.

(The lawyers actually claimed that no material should ever go without having an owner.)


The only miniscule tiniest bit of understanding I have for Disney when it comes to that kind of litigation is when they take a story that has almost zero popularity/marketability/profitability, then turn it into a multi-hundred million dollar enterprise where they themselves get ripped off by obvious spinoffs of Disney-styled work.
It just makes the lawyers job simple when they can point to specific ownership and license agreements.  Disney or not, that's just a lazy legal team wanting an easier job.
 
2013-08-08 04:08:41 PM  
*glasses on*

...what a Grimm find.
 
2013-08-08 04:20:22 PM  

Outlaw2097: *glasses on*

...what a Grimm find.


i105.photobucket.com
 
2013-08-08 04:52:00 PM  
What really POs me is how the great classics become "Disney" classics:

Disney's Alice in Wonderland
Disney's Cinderella
Disney's Bible

They don't even give the name of the real author. Children are probably growing up thinking Disney is the author of Winnie the Pooh and Through the Looking Glass. Children are cut off from the classics, nursary rhymes and centuries of child lore as it is, but with Disney slapping the Fuhrer's name on every work in the public domain, children might not even think of Googling the real books and tales and discovering worlds and universes that haven't been homogenized and appropriated by the machine.

Dammit. It is Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland. I'm sure he would take his name off of the project if he were alive, but then, I'm sure he wouldn't sell the copyright for all the gold in the combined vaults of Disney and Uncle Scrooge.

The workers in the Disney machine are brilliant and their work top rate, but Disney always manages to inject poison into the product. It's like thumbing through old South African tourist magazines in a dentist's office. Something is missing, something is wrong, but you can't quite put your finger on why the happy black and white children playing together in glorious Defecto-Color seem to be so plastic and unreal.

Disney's world is like a casino--there are no clocks.
 
2013-08-08 04:53:11 PM  
Apart from the singing and dancing clocks, of course.
 
2013-08-08 04:54:11 PM  

MBooda: If it's not Wilhelm Busch or Heinrich Hoffmann, I'm not interested.
[2.bp.blogspot.com image 400x207]
[www.gutenberg.org image 600x400]
/ah, fond memories of a grisly german childhood


I've been reading both of those to my 4 year old daughter. She likes them but she doesn't care for the Grimms tales. I suspect it's because there aren't enough pictures.
My wife also has an unabridged English translation of Snow White. I've never seen the Disney version but I'm guessing they changed the ending.
 
2013-08-08 05:07:29 PM  

brantgoose: What really POs me is how the great classics become "Disney" classics:

Disney's Alice in Wonderland
Disney's Cinderella
Disney's Bible

They don't even give the name of the real author. Children are probably growing up thinking Disney is the author of Winnie the Pooh and Through the Looking Glass. Children are cut off from the classics, nursary rhymes and centuries of child lore as it is, but with Disney slapping the Fuhrer's name on every work in the public domain, children might not even think of Googling the real books and tales and discovering worlds and universes that haven't been homogenized and appropriated by the machine.

Dammit. It is Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland. I'm sure he would take his name off of the project if he were alive, but then, I'm sure he wouldn't sell the copyright for all the gold in the combined vaults of Disney and Uncle Scrooge.

The workers in the Disney machine are brilliant and their work top rate, but Disney always manages to inject poison into the product. It's like thumbing through old South African tourist magazines in a dentist's office. Something is missing, something is wrong, but you can't quite put your finger on why the happy black and white children playing together in glorious Defecto-Color seem to be so plastic and unreal.

Disney's world is like a casino--there are no clocks.


I think children who grow up unexposed to those classics would remain so with or without Disney. Disney has some right to title them as they do because they stray so far from the source material. The modify the stories so heavily and the lessons implied but the originals that the result is a Disney story with just some of the ideas of character and motif suggested by the classic's title.

Our daughter will read and be read the real materials as she gets up to those ages. She's only 2 now, but I will fully encourage her to read the real things to experience the depth of story from books. She already loves book-time and can handle some pretty long stuff for her age (40-50 page picture/narrative stuff like the Golden Books version of Princess and the Frog, just as an example). She can recite large portions of Horton Hears a Who.

What I am trying to get at is that the parents are the ones holding those children back, not Disney. Disney is making colorful, musical, engaging features that take children to magical places. Do they sanitize and dilute the grittiness? Yes. They aren't trying to be that storyteller, they leave that to others. They still can get scary, see the images I posted earlier of the demon from Fantasia and Mother Gothel's death scene from Tangled.

TL:DR, Your kids will read the books if YOU expose them. If not, at least they'll have SOME reference to classic stories. Don't fault Disney for having a brand and storytelling style.
 
2013-08-08 05:42:10 PM  

Leo Bloom's Freakout: TL:DR, Your kids will read the books if YOU expose them. If not, at least they'll have SOME reference to classic stories. Don't fault Disney for having a brand and storytelling style.


I'll give my kids what I got when I was around 7: the Red and Blue Fairy Books. And more colors as well.
 
2013-08-08 05:59:38 PM  

theorellior: Leo Bloom's Freakout: TL:DR, Your kids will read the books if YOU expose them. If not, at least they'll have SOME reference to classic stories. Don't fault Disney for having a brand and storytelling style.

I'll give my kids what I got when I was around 7: the Red and Blue Fairy Books. And more colors as well.


And that's perfect. I just don't have a problem with Disney doing what they do. I figure the more versions of a story they hear, the more they understand how humans transmit, adapt, and repurpose the same story over and over again. It gives a sense of history, critical thinking, and understanding language.
 
2013-08-08 06:28:37 PM  
Are any of them similar to the Krampus?
 
2013-08-08 06:29:22 PM  
And in next week's news, Disney gets copyright laws extended to one day before these stories were written.
 
2013-08-08 06:59:32 PM  
The original version of "Jack and the Beanstalk" mentions that the basement of the giant's castle was filled with women whom he'd imprisoned because "they wouldn't eat the flesh of their dead husbands."

Or Cinderella, which has the stepsisters slicing off parts of their feet in order to fit into the slipper, but the prince sees through their antics because of the squelching blood.
 
2013-08-08 07:07:16 PM  

Agnes Gonxha's Confidant: Maybe now I will get to see a Disney princess in a Dirdl

[www.alcanthang.com image 560x840]



I liked where this thread WAS going..
 encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com. encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com

...and we all lived happily ever after.
 
2013-08-09 12:36:06 AM  

theorellior: Leo Bloom's Freakout: TL:DR, Your kids will read the books if YOU expose them. If not, at least they'll have SOME reference to classic stories. Don't fault Disney for having a brand and storytelling style.

I'll give my kids what I got when I was around 7: the Red and Blue Fairy Books. And more colors as well.


I won't ever give my kids what I got when I was around 7.  They can go find their own disease-ridden hookers, damnit.
 
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