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(Smithsonian Magazine)   100 years ago, America became modern when line of brand-new Model T Fords parked in front of International Exhibition of Modern Art   (blogs.smithsonianmag.com) divider line 20
    More: Cool, contemporary art, International Exhibition of Modern Art, Model T Fords, classic cars, Marcel Duchamp, Irving Berlin, Matisse, President Theodore Roosevelt  
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1151 clicks; posted to Geek » on 08 Aug 2013 at 9:04 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



20 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-08-08 09:08:38 AM  
Smug Model T owners and iPhone users are kindered spitirts?
Is that what this means?
 
das
2013-08-08 09:16:42 AM  
The first one isn't a T. Looks air cooled.....maybe a Franklin????
 
2013-08-08 09:18:02 AM  
Neat article.

Can anyone explain why that one painting was so controversial?
 
2013-08-08 09:19:59 AM  
I'll just leave this here.
 
2013-08-08 09:20:53 AM  
I love old-timey steampunkish crap!
 
2013-08-08 09:22:48 AM  
My great grandfather sold Fords back around that time. Somewhere I have his salesman's guide to the Model T that talks about all the features to pitch to customers. I wonder if it is actually worth anything.
 
2013-08-08 09:30:55 AM  
Those don't really look like Model T's at all.  Would anyone with better knowledge of antique autos care to give us an analysis of what we're seeing?
 
2013-08-08 09:31:07 AM  
blogs.smithsonianmag.com
Hey y'all, who farted?
 
2013-08-08 09:43:45 AM  
singout.org

RIP T Model Ford
 
2013-08-08 10:08:45 AM  

Pimparoo: Neat article.

Can anyone explain why that one painting was so controversial?


It was the first Cubist work to get public attention in the US, the first to be part of a major exhibition.

Teddy Roosevelt described it as an explosion in a shingle factory, which is pretty accurate. It's a good painting, not a great one.
 
2013-08-08 10:45:26 AM  
Get a horse!

/too soon?
 
2013-08-08 10:54:28 AM  
Carriage Rally in Bethel, Maine last weekend.
Awesome seeing 100+ year old M-As and M-Ts still motoring around.
 
2013-08-08 11:01:30 AM  
Those are all chauffeur driven cars, not Ts.  My brass era knowledge is limited, but the first in line looks like a Renault.
 
2013-08-08 11:28:59 AM  
Subby accidentally the whole headline?
 
2013-08-08 12:24:33 PM  

das: The first one isn't a T. Looks air cooled.....maybe a Franklin????


Looks more like a Renault to me.
 
2013-08-08 12:26:00 PM  

Jekylman: das: The first one isn't a T. Looks air cooled.....maybe a Franklin????

Looks more like a Renault to me.


jonmurr: Those are all chauffeur driven cars, not Ts.  My brass era knowledge is limited, but the first in line looks like a Renault.


Damn you useless business meetings interrupting my internet time
 
2013-08-08 02:24:21 PM  
Not Model Ts.  Pretty sure passenger air service hadnt begun by 1913 either.
 
2013-08-08 03:37:41 PM  
So a Renault, 2 chauffeur cars that are not Model Ts and 1 horse-drawn carriage.

Other than that it's a completely accurate description of that photo.
 
2013-08-08 06:26:32 PM  
Heh. Submitter math.  Any assault rifle=AK47.
                                   Any Semi-auto Pistol = Glock.
                                   Any brass era car = Model T.
 
2013-08-08 07:18:25 PM  
TFA has been updated.  So you antique car nerds can let go of your rage now.
 
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