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(Boston.com)   Jury to begin to decide if Whitey Bulger is guilty or kinda guilty   (boston.com) divider line 37
    More: Followup, Whitey Bulger, Winter Hill Gang, pathological liars, United States Attorney, racketeering  
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1879 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Aug 2013 at 9:21 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



37 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-08-06 09:23:28 AM  
Ill go with kinda guilty
 
2013-08-06 09:25:31 AM  
Or just a legitimate businessman railroaded by the feds.  And in no way are they saying that out of fear.  No sir.

/anyone want a sip of my drink first?
 
2013-08-06 09:26:05 AM  
Entire jury found dead by an "unfortunate accident" in 5, 4, 3, 2, 1.....
 
2013-08-06 09:26:40 AM  
When do we prosecute the FBI officers who protected him?

ohwaityou'reseriousletmelaughevenharder.jpg
 
2013-08-06 09:28:12 AM  

generallyso: When do we prosecute the FBI officers who protected him?

ohwaityou'reseriousletmelaughevenharder.jpg


didn't we already prosecute his handlers?
 
2013-08-06 09:30:16 AM  
Why don't they just send him to one of the states that has the death penalty, if he is found guilty, then the rest of the states can save money by not having to have more of these stupid trials.

The whole "Bulgar isn't guilty, the government is," disgusts me.
 
2013-08-06 09:32:39 AM  
I'd like to see him swing.
 
2013-08-06 09:32:45 AM  

manimal2878: Why don't they just send him to one of the states that has the death penalty, if he is found guilty, then the rest of the states can save money by not having to have more of these stupid trials.

The whole "Bulgar isn't guilty, the government is," disgusts me.


why would the death penalty matter? He's in his 80s. The only reason he got caught was so that he can die before being found guilty (and probably to make his case that he wasn't a rat)

why can't we both accept that Bulgar and the FBI were guilty of a bunch of shiat in the 60s-90s?
 
2013-08-06 09:32:57 AM  
Going to be a hung jury.  The guy will have gotten to at least one of them.
 
2013-08-06 09:34:13 AM  

somedude210: why can't we both accept that Bulgar and the FBI were guilty of a bunch of shiat in the 60s-90s?


accept that both Bulgar and the FBI

/need coffee
//and to use the preview button
 
2013-08-06 09:34:51 AM  
Whitey's always guilty.
 
2013-08-06 09:36:35 AM  
Not Guilty
 
2013-08-06 09:37:02 AM  
Exclusive: FBI allowed informants to commit 5,600 crimes

Agents authorized 15 crimes a day, on average, including everything from buying and selling illegal drugs to bribing government officials and plotting robberies.

"This is all being operated clandestinely. Congress doesn't even have the information," said Rep. Stephen Lynch, D-Mass., who sponsored a bill that would require federal agencies to notify lawmakers about the most serious crimes their informants commit. "I think there's a problem here, and we should have full disclosure to Congress."


I feel safer, don't you?
 
2013-08-06 09:37:52 AM  
should we place bets on the outcome?

half guilty, half not guilty

why? because we Bostonians are a weird bunch
 
2013-08-06 09:40:32 AM  

fat boy: Whitey's always guilty.


YOU sir....made me laugh.  Well done.
 
2013-08-06 09:43:35 AM  

neversubmit: Exclusive: FBI allowed informants to commit 5,600 crimes

Agents authorized 15 crimes a day, on average, including everything from buying and selling illegal drugs to bribing government officials and plotting robberies.

"This is all being operated clandestinely. Congress doesn't even have the information," said Rep. Stephen Lynch, D-Mass., who sponsored a bill that would require federal agencies to notify lawmakers about the most serious crimes their informants commit. "I think there's a problem here, and we should have full disclosure to Congress."

I feel safer, don't you?


Considering they aren't allowed to commit violent crimes and they are over 15,000 informants I don't think it matters.
 
2013-08-06 09:47:15 AM  

computerguyUT: Entire jury found dead by an "unfortunate accident" in 5, 4, 3, 2, 1.....


If the Boston Bombings happened around this time, I'd say he put out a hit on the city.
 
2013-08-06 09:56:40 AM  

generallyso: When do we prosecute the FBI officers who protected him?

ohwaityou'reseriousletmelaughevenharder.jpg


John Connolly is currently serving 20 years.  Morris got into some trouble as well.  A lot of the stories have been sensationalized and exaggerated to sell books.

/CSB

My dad testified in the Bulger trial as a hostile witness for the defense.  My dad was an FBI agent that worked the Angiulo case. He felt every bit deceived by his co-workers as the rest of us do.  He had 3 small kids at home and came home every day at 6pm.  He was the type of guy that never flashed his badge to get out of a traffic ticket in front of us.  Never used his status to get us out of trouble when we got into it. We didn't even know what cases he was working until they went to trial.

He didn't know that some of the other agents were on the take.  He had a feeling that Bulgers gang had special protection from on high, but it was way above his pay grade. When the SAC and the ASAC tell you there is no issue, When another agent from HQ comes in and investigates and finds no issue,  you bury your head in the work your supposed to be doing.

He was never involved at all with Bulger as an informant, so his testimony was brief.

At the time informants had a limited number of people who knew their real identity.  They were the primary and a secondary informant handlers,the agent who handled the informants for the Office and The SAC/ASAC.  Connolly was the third.   After that their identity is hidden from other agents.   Unfortunately Connolly had access to the entire offices informants.  This is the perfect set up for what happened then.

It is necessary to protect the witnesses identities for the very reasons exposed by this trial, and the methodology has changed since then to not allow any one person to have that kind of access any more.

But lumping all the FBI into a group that is criminal kinda irks me.  I know I'm biased but I think a lot of good agents worked in the Boston office at that time are being mislabeled by the actions of a few.
 
2013-08-06 10:04:54 AM  
That's GUILTY! Guilty, guilty, guilty, guilty!

/obscure
 
2013-08-06 10:06:28 AM  

somedude210: why would the death penalty matter?


Because that would put him in prison until he dies one way or the other.
 
2013-08-06 10:10:15 AM  

manimal2878: Because that would put him in prison until he dies one way or the other.


he's in his 80s, you honestly think that any conviction he gets will get him out before he dies?
 
2013-08-06 10:11:34 AM  

neversubmit: Exclusive: FBI allowed informants to commit 5,600 crimes

Agents authorized 15 crimes a day, on average, including everything from buying and selling illegal drugs to bribing government officials and plotting robberies.

"This is all being operated clandestinely. Congress doesn't even have the information," said Rep. Stephen Lynch, D-Mass., who sponsored a bill that would require federal agencies to notify lawmakers about the most serious crimes their informants commit. "I think there's a problem here, and we should have full disclosure to Congress."

I feel safer, don't you?


What kind of fantasy world do you people live in?  Informants generally aren't providing information to be good Samaritans, they usually have been pinched for something and are turned, have gotten in too deep with their bookies or have started using what they should have been selling and fear for their lives.

99% of them are bad people who have done bad things, or girlfriends of bad people who were at least complicit before they got in over their heads. They need to keep doing those bad things to stay valuable as informants.
 
2013-08-06 10:27:58 AM  
Don't want to be on this jury
 
2013-08-06 10:28:59 AM  

Carth: neversubmit: Exclusive: FBI allowed informants to commit 5,600 crimes

Agents authorized 15 crimes a day, on average, including everything from buying and selling illegal drugs to bribing government officials and plotting robberies.

"This is all being operated clandestinely. Congress doesn't even have the information," said Rep. Stephen Lynch, D-Mass., who sponsored a bill that would require federal agencies to notify lawmakers about the most serious crimes their informants commit. "I think there's a problem here, and we should have full disclosure to Congress."

I feel safer, don't you?

Considering they aren't allowed to commit violent crimes and they are over 15,000 informants I don't think it matters.


How sure are you?
 
2013-08-06 10:39:44 AM  
It's sweet that Whitey's getting a Retirement Party sponsored by the government, many of whom are reputed to be co-workers. And they made it so he's got the spotlight even though he normally hides from fame.
 
2013-08-06 10:41:50 AM  

somedude210: manimal2878: Because that would put him in prison until he dies one way or the other.

he's in his 80s, you honestly think that any conviction he gets will get him out before he dies?


To be honest I was thinking he was like 70, nevermind me then.
 
2013-08-06 10:41:52 AM  
i.imgur.com

RIP
 
2013-08-06 10:46:47 AM  

neversubmit: Carth: neversubmit: Exclusive: FBI allowed informants to commit 5,600 crimes

Agents authorized 15 crimes a day, on average, including everything from buying and selling illegal drugs to bribing government officials and plotting robberies.

"This is all being operated clandestinely. Congress doesn't even have the information," said Rep. Stephen Lynch, D-Mass., who sponsored a bill that would require federal agencies to notify lawmakers about the most serious crimes their informants commit. "I think there's a problem here, and we should have full disclosure to Congress."

I feel safer, don't you?

Considering they aren't allowed to commit violent crimes and they are over 15,000 informants I don't think it matters.

How sure are you?


Very. They are overseen by the Justice Department, not Congress, as it should be. Telling anything to Congress is asking it to be on the front page of the paper which you want to avoid with sources and informant names.
 
2013-08-06 10:53:16 AM  

manimal2878: Why don't they just send him to one of the states that has the death penalty, if he is found guilty, then the rest of the states can save money by not having to have more of these stupid trials.

The whole "Bulgar isn't guilty, the government is," disgusts me.


whynotboth.jpg
 
2013-08-06 10:56:48 AM  

ElwoodCuse: That's GUILTY! Guilty, guilty, guilty, guilty!

/obscure


Not really
www.penguinpetes.com
/hot
 
2013-08-06 12:26:29 PM  

manimal2878: somedude210: why would the death penalty matter?

Because that would put him in prison until he dies one way or the other.


Mehh, let some producer make a reality show and run the "trial" until he dies, on TV, with drama, and stuff.
 
2013-08-06 12:31:30 PM  
Can't we just keep him in prison anyway? He is not a savory kind of person.
 
2013-08-06 12:56:46 PM  
He is not guilty in my book.

/don't kill me bro
 
2013-08-06 01:41:12 PM  

neversubmit: Exclusive: FBI allowed informants to commit 5,600 crimes

Agents authorized 15 crimes a day, on average, including everything from buying and selling illegal drugs to bribing government officials and plotting robberies.

"This is all being operated clandestinely. Congress doesn't even have the information," said Rep. Stephen Lynch, D-Mass., who sponsored a bill that would require federal agencies to notify lawmakers about the most serious crimes their informants commit. "I think there's a problem here, and we should have full disclosure to Congress."

I feel safer, don't you?


Like they weren't going to commit those crimes if they didn't have FBI handlers? You can't very well be an undercover informant in a criminal group and NOT commit crimes. People start to wonder what your deal is.
 
2013-08-06 01:47:54 PM  

scut207: generallyso: When do we prosecute the FBI officers who protected him?

ohwaityou'reseriousletmelaughevenharder.jpg

John Connolly is currently serving 20 years.  Morris got into some trouble as well.  A lot of the stories have been sensationalized and exaggerated to sell books.

/CSB

My dad testified in the Bulger trial as a hostile witness for the defense.  My dad was an FBI agent that worked the Angiulo case. He felt every bit deceived by his co-workers as the rest of us do.  He had 3 small kids at home and came home every day at 6pm.  He was the type of guy that never flashed his badge to get out of a traffic ticket in front of us.  Never used his status to get us out of trouble when we got into it. We didn't even know what cases he was working until they went to trial.

He didn't know that some of the other agents were on the take.  He had a feeling that Bulgers gang had special protection from on high, but it was way above his pay grade. When the SAC and the ASAC tell you there is no issue, When another agent from HQ comes in and investigates and finds no issue,  you bury your head in the work your supposed to be doing.

He was never involved at all with Bulger as an informant, so his testimony was brief.

At the time informants had a limited number of people who knew their real identity.  They were the primary and a secondary informant handlers,the agent who handled the informants for the Office and The SAC/ASAC.  Connolly was the third.   After that their identity is hidden from other agents.   Unfortunately Connolly had access to the entire offices informants.  This is the perfect set up for what happened then.

It is necessary to protect the witnesses identities for the very reasons exposed by this trial, and the methodology has changed since then to not allow any one person to have that kind of access any more.

But lumping all the FBI into a group that is criminal kinda irks me.  I know I'm biased but I think a lot of good agents worked in the Boston off ...


So....law enforcement thinks profiling is unfair?   :)

/mostly kidding, glad your Dad was one of the good ones.
 
2013-08-06 01:48:33 PM  

manimal2878: Why don't they just send him to one of the states that has the death penalty, if he is found guilty, then the rest of the states can save money by not having to have more of these stupid trials.

The whole "Bulgar isn't guilty, the government is," disgusts me.


whycantitbeboth.jpg
 
2013-08-06 01:50:42 PM  

Tyrone Slothrop: manimal2878: Why don't they just send him to one of the states that has the death penalty, if he is found guilty, then the rest of the states can save money by not having to have more of these stupid trials.

The whole "Bulgar isn't guilty, the government is," disgusts me.

whynotboth.jpg


D'oh, I shoulda scrolled all the way down first...
 
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