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(Pando Daily)   Who killed the music industry? You know, besides Justin Bieber   (pandodaily.com) divider line 206
    More: Interesting, Nigel Godrich, complex network, record executive, Explosions in the Sky, ASCAP, macklemore, technical reports, choirs  
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4661 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 06 Aug 2013 at 8:00 AM (50 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-08-06 07:32:44 AM
Suicide by schlock.

End of article.
 
2013-08-06 07:57:01 AM
 
2013-08-06 08:12:09 AM
I dunno... the people who screwed over groups like Pandora with bullshiat royalty deals and gave them reasons to push indy labels more than major record labels? The people who sign every harebrained act with a clear complexion and a goofy haircut just so they can slap the face behind an autotuner and sell the album covers to stupid teenage girls? The people who thought it would be a really great idea to start suing small children?

Nah.... there's probably a new old-school-Napster-like program out there or something.... yea.... that's gotta be the ticket...
 
2013-08-06 08:14:43 AM
Lars Ulrich
 
2013-08-06 08:20:06 AM
I'm not sure where all this hyperbole comes from....

I hear a new song about a new artist from TV, the internet, a friend, where ever and then I buy their song and/or album online.

There doesn't seem to be a shortage or music, far as I can tell.
 
2013-08-06 08:21:37 AM
I'd like to blame autocorrect on that last post, but I can't.  I'm apparently just an idiot.

"I hear about a new song or artist......."
"There doesn't seem to be a shortage OF music....."
 
2013-08-06 08:21:43 AM
Unless you listen to Bieber or the endless series of future Biebers stretching into perpetuity then why do you care?  The bands you like rarely made any money when there was a music industry.
 
2013-08-06 08:22:42 AM

buntz: I'm not sure where all this hyperbole comes from....

I hear a new song about a new artist from TV, the internet, a friend, where ever and then I buy their song and/or album online.

There doesn't seem to be a shortage or music, far as I can tell.


It's dead!!! Dead, I tell you!!! Nobody makes millions in the music industry anymore!!!  You should let them charge you more for the same terrible tripe played on the FM radio!!!
 
2013-08-06 08:23:12 AM
I'm going to blame middle-schoolers. Girls from 10-14 killed it.
 
2013-08-06 08:24:04 AM
Music is still alive though right?
 
2013-08-06 08:29:10 AM
The Butler?
 
2013-08-06 08:31:55 AM
It's a contracting economy due to aging boomers.
Looks like 40- to 60-year-olds just don't run out and snap up the latest fiddy cent or momma gaga CD, do they?

Plus, I think lots of people unconsciously sense the inherent rip-off that comes from paying 15 bucks for a one-cent plastic disc that sounds kind of crappy both due to compression and aging ears.
 
2013-08-06 08:32:30 AM

Gunny Highway: Music is still alive though right?


The heart of rock and roll is still beating.
 
2013-08-06 08:43:28 AM
People who felt they were owed free music because they bought a T-shirt or went to a show definitely had a hand in the changing dynamic. It's a weird mentality, because people are fans of the music but they don't respect the artist enough to pay for the product that the artist labored over. Suddenly, people who fill out excel spreadsheets all day or find the task bar for office drones when it goes missing are experts on how the music industry works and artists better shut up and let their stuff be downloaded because someone bought a T-shirt ten years ago or might one day go to their show again.

On the other hand, the major label industry and the machinery that props it up (radio, videos, etc.) grew too big in the last 20 years to not have a "churn and burn" attitude towards new groups where one new breakout covers the cost of a dozen or more failures. Long-lasting groups like The Cure were cultivated. J. Mascis and Bob Mould have careers now because they have a home grown audience.

It comes down to the fact that it's all tonal music and tonal music is for children, any way. So let's fire up Now That's What I Call An Anthology of Noise and Electronic Music Jamz, Volume 34 and rock out.
 
2013-08-06 08:44:21 AM
Also, everyone lauded Radiohead for releasing and album under the "pay whatever you want" model but no one pointed out they didn't do it again.
 
2013-08-06 08:45:48 AM
I think subby means "Who killed the music MONOPOLY?"


/we all did
//who cares
 
2013-08-06 08:49:01 AM
I'm going to go with whoever is responsible for that "I don't care, I love it" song.  That thing is a farking monstrosity.
 
2013-08-06 08:51:35 AM
The article barely mentioned the virus that is manufactured music.

Do you remember the good old days, when the singer/songwriter was usually one and the same? Sure, some of the greats sang someone else's song. But for the most part, they were singer/songwriters.
Then the boy bands happened.
All of a sudden, music stopped being the communication of a lone soul. Focus groups were formed to see how to sell the most music. Songs were engineered to fit a market profile. The industry cranked out performers, not artists.

That's why the music industry died.
 
2013-08-06 08:54:42 AM

SockMonkeyHolocaust: It's a weird mentality, because people are fans of the music but they don't respect the artist enough to pay for the product that the artist labored over.


When I was a teenager, I liked Ted Nugent.
I haven't sought out and listened to a Ted Nugent song in about 30 years.
I think the problem, if you want to call it a problem, is that people grow up.

I agree with you about the technocrats, though.
They've infested and wrecked nearly every facet of the economic system.
 
2013-08-06 08:54:49 AM

Bonkthat_Again: The article barely mentioned the virus that is manufactured music.

Do you remember the good old days, when the singer/songwriter was usually one and the same? Sure, some of the greats sang someone else's song. But for the most part, they were singer/songwriters.
Then the boy bands happened.
All of a sudden, music stopped being the communication of a lone soul. Focus groups were formed to see how to sell the most music. Songs were engineered to fit a market profile. The industry cranked out performers, not artists.

That's why the music industry died.


So basically you blame Nirvana?
 
2013-08-06 08:55:01 AM

Bonkthat_Again: Do you remember the good old days, when the singer/songwriter was usually one and the same? Sure, some of the greats sang someone else's song. But for the most part, they were singer/songwriters.
Then the boy bands happened.
All of a sudden, music stopped being the communication of a lone soul. Focus groups were formed to see how to sell the most music. Songs were engineered to fit a market profile. The industry cranked out performers, not artists.

That's why the music industry died.


This!

Plus greed
 
2013-08-06 08:56:06 AM
I say American Idol killed the music industry. They want everyone to sound the same.
 
2013-08-06 08:56:24 AM
The marketing department killed the music industry.
 
2013-08-06 08:59:09 AM
The business of music is thriving, even if the major-label model represented by the Sony/Universal/Warner tri-opoly is obsolescent.

I have more friends who are able to make a living from music (touring and self-recording) than ever before, even though none of them will ever go platinum or be heard on the radio station they put on in the supermarket.
 
2013-08-06 08:59:14 AM

Bonkthat_Again: Then the boy bands happened.


Such as The Beatles?

Just sayin', let's not pretend that's a new phenomenon.
 
2013-08-06 09:03:04 AM
I'm going to say nothing has changed but now failing and failed bands have more places for people to hear their complaints even if no one listened to their music.

This XKCD explains the situation pretty well

imgs.xkcd.com

Apply this to musical tastes. Everyone can enjoy the specific music they want without compromise and engage with other people world wide justifying their choice.  So now more artists get a small following but nothing that can generate revenue that they can live on so they lash out at the system.  Record labels and radio did a decent enough job at filtering the crap and failing bands had no one to complain to which meant there were fewer bands to get behind and this lead to increased popularity for a successful bands.

In other words music democracy doesn't work.
 
2013-08-06 09:06:43 AM
Spotify and the like happened. It's even easier to use Spotify than it is to pirate an album, so I can't even remember the last time I bought one. That said, it's probably a good thing that the industry is contracting, since that overcharging bloat goes to pay for executives and PR people that do nothing for me as a listener. If total music income is down, but a greater share of that is now going to artists, I'm cool with that.
 
2013-08-06 09:08:02 AM

GoldSpider: Bonkthat_Again: Then the boy bands happened.

Such as The Beatles?

Just sayin', let's not pretend that's a new phenomenon.



For everyone complaining about music catering to teenage girls, not many folks remember that music has been catering to teenage girls since Frank SInatra and Perry Como. American Idol is also not a new idea, if you look back at shows like Star Search.

I can't see how iTunes has hurt the industry, since it has cut down sharply on the amount of manufacturing costs. Labels now only print 2 million CDs instead of 10 million. Maybe the solution is to go back to the recording models that existed in the Beatles day. Instead of recording an entire album for every single artist, record a few singles, put them out, and then, after about four or five get traction, then put out the album.
 
2013-08-06 09:09:01 AM
The systematic conversion of the music industry into a model industry that promotes looks over music quality coupled with corporate radio's refusal to let their DJs play music they think is good.
 
2013-08-06 09:10:10 AM
Antares Audio Technologies -  the folks who developed Autotune

Protip: If you can't carry a tune in a bucket, you shouldn't be a singer. I don't care HOW
cute and popular you are or how well you fit the Disney stable mold.
 
2013-08-06 09:13:22 AM

HotIgneous Intruder: Gunny Highway: Music is still alive though right?

The heart of rock and roll is still beating.


Yeah, but video killed the radio star.
 
2013-08-06 09:17:12 AM

stoli n coke: Maybe the solution is to go back to the recording models that existed in the Beatles day.


It's Only Northern Song.

I mostly just like this song.
 
2013-08-06 09:24:08 AM
It was demographics.
I bought my last CD in about 1994.
 
2013-08-06 09:25:30 AM
Can't say who killed it, but when it died?

The day the Bay City Rollers broke up.

Life has not been the same since.
 
2013-08-06 09:31:19 AM

HotIgneous Intruder: It was demographics.
I bought my last CD in about 1994.


I bought mine in 98. I had to get music for my wedding.
/that cannon d song, I'd ask the wife but she'd kill me.
 
2013-08-06 09:37:53 AM

SockMonkeyHolocaust: People who felt they were owed free music because they bought a T-shirt or went to a show definitely had a hand in the changing dynamic. It's a weird mentality, because people are fans of the music but they don't respect the artist enough to pay for the product that the artist labored over. Suddenly, people who fill out excel spreadsheets all day or find the task bar for office drones when it goes missing are experts on how the music industry works and artists better shut up and let their stuff be downloaded because someone bought a T-shirt ten years ago or might one day go to their show again.

On the other hand, the major label industry and the machinery that props it up (radio, videos, etc.) grew too big in the last 20 years to not have a "churn and burn" attitude towards new groups where one new breakout covers the cost of a dozen or more failures. Long-lasting groups like The Cure were cultivated. J. Mascis and Bob Mould have careers now because they have a home grown audience.

It comes down to the fact that it's all tonal music and tonal music is for children, any way. So let's fire up Now That's What I Call An Anthology of Noise and Electronic Music Jamz, Volume 34 and rock out.


I don't think most people have a problem with paying artists directly for their music.  Of course, there are assholes out there that will pirate anything and everything.  They're more interested in filling out their data library then having the music.

Them aside, the success of iTunes and other digital distribution shows people will pay for music as long as you make it easy, reasonably priced, and don't drown them in DRM.  The music industry wants to go back to the days where they controlled the product from creation to your ears while paying artists shiat, and they resist the inevitable changes to that dynamic instead of embracing them.

I prefer the new dynamic.  Artists have a reasonable expectation to earn a decent living as long as they market them selves smartly and don't suck.  Sure, they pay their percentage to their distributor, but at least they're making more than pennies on the dollar.
 
2013-08-06 09:43:08 AM

GoldSpider: Bonkthat_Again: Then the boy bands happened.

Such as The Beatles?

Just sayin', let's not pretend that's a new phenomenon.


Cause everybody knows The Beatles couldn't carry a tune, didn't play their own instruments and couldn't compose music.

If you want to compare an oldies group to a current boy band, look at The Monkees.
 
2013-08-06 09:47:32 AM
It was CDs. When it was all albums and cassettes the stoners had to come in and buy new copies of Dark Side of the Moon and Bob Marley's Legend every few months because they wore out. CDs, properly cared for lasted forever. Deeper catalog records were very profitable because they cost very little to stamp out and all the production cost was made back long ago.

That and the fact that any dingleberry at a drive thru has a chance at a contract if they are an Idol Talent.
 
2013-08-06 09:53:58 AM

BizarreMan: If you want to compare an oldies group to a current boy band, look at The Monkees.


That's fair.
 
2013-08-06 09:56:31 AM

GoldSpider: Bonkthat_Again: Then the boy bands happened.

Such as The Beatles?

Just sayin', let's not pretend that's a new phenomenon.


Look at the song credits for the Beatles. Then look at Beyonce's.
Apples and Oranges. The Beatles wrote and performed the majority of their songs. That's what made them artists. Beyonce is a performer. There's a difference.


Songs and songwriters of the Beatles

Songs and songwriters of Beyonce

Maurice Starr was one of the biggest contributors to manufactured music. He founded New Edition and NKOTB.

Even Michael Jackson wrote the majority of his hits.
 
2013-08-06 09:58:05 AM

Bobo_Spiewack: It was CDs. When it was all albums and cassettes the stoners had to come in and buy new copies of Dark Side of the Moon and Bob Marley's Legend every few months because they wore out. CDs, properly cared for lasted forever. Deeper catalog records were very profitable because they cost very little to stamp out and all the production cost was made back long ago.

That and the fact that any dingleberry at a drive thru has a chance at a contract if they are an Idol Talent.



The different formats also created a false sense of profitability during the 70s and 80s. Back then, people would buy the album to listen to at home, then buy the 8-track to listen to in their car. After 8-tracks became obsolete, they'd buy cassettes for the same reason, then when CDs came out, they'd buy those for the better quality and easy ability to skip songs. Of course, that eventually led to buying the downloads when the CDs wore out or wouldn't load into their iPods.

That's why nearly half of the top 20 selling albums of all-time came from the 70s and 80s. A lot of people were buying the same albums 3 or 4 times.

Now that there isn't a clear sign of the next step format wise, record companies know they can't rely on the added money that format changes afforded them.
 
2013-08-06 09:59:56 AM
It was Insane Clown Posse. They do shiat like that all the time. Bastards.
 
2013-08-06 10:02:03 AM
It started to die when Disco showed up. Changing technologies gave real music a zombie life because we all kept buying the new formats. Now were done with that.

They might have to stop pushing musicians based on how they look and promote them based on how they actually sound.
 
2013-08-06 10:04:49 AM
As a veteran musician (not successful, you've never heard of me), I'd like to offer what I've seen over the last 20+ years. It's been fascinating.

First, the music industry isn't dead. If you want to buy music you can, and you have more opportunities to buy a more wildly diverse collection of music than ever before in history. When we're talking about the relative financial health of large companies that sell music - who cares? Do you care? Do you honestly spend time thinking about how Sony's music division is impacting their larger bottom line? Musicians generally don't expect to make money, and the financial health of the big record companies has absolutely zero impact on whether people choose to play music or not, and what kind of music they produce.

Second, so what? As I mentioned, music is now more available and more diverse than ever. True, it's hard to make a successful life (and virtually impossible to make a lavish living) playing music, but that's always been true. There are great bands out there still doing great things. In the 80's you didn't hear the Pixies or the Replacements on the radio, but they were there. Same holds true now.

Which gets me to point three. Saying "the music industry is dead" is really just code for saying "the bands I like aren't popular". There are still artists who sell millions of records. You may not like Beyonce, but someone does. What you're complaining about is the fact that the kind of music you like isn't turning your favorite musicians (and in many cases, yourselves) into mega-rich superstars. Is that really what you want? Do you really want your favorite band to sell 10 million records at a shot? Do you want your favorite music on the radio, in tv, and online so much that you can't stand to listen to it any longer?

</rant>
 
2013-08-06 10:06:22 AM
Modern pop has been stripped of dynamics and all sounds like the same overcompressed blocks of noise these days.  Remember when music had dynamics?
 
2013-08-06 10:12:17 AM

Detinwolf: Modern pop has been stripped of dynamics and all sounds like the same overcompressed blocks of noise these days.  Remember when music had dynamics?


What modern pop may look like
i28.photobucket.com 
i.imgur.com
 
2013-08-06 10:12:21 AM

skozlaw: I dunno... the people who screwed over groups like Pandora with bullshiat royalty deals and gave them reasons to push indy labels more than major record labels? The people who sign every harebrained act with a clear complexion and a goofy haircut just so they can slap the face behind an autotuner and sell the album covers to stupid teenage girls? The people who thought it would be a really great idea to start suing small children?

Nah.... there's probably a new old-school-Napster-like program out there or something.... yea.... that's gotta be the ticket...


You know who else started off as a small child? Hitler. How did that work out? Figure it out!
 
2013-08-06 10:14:53 AM

Rapmaster2000: Unless you listen to Bieber or the endless series of future Biebers stretching into perpetuity then why do you care?  The bands you like rarely made any money when there was a music industry.


LOL... Yep.
 
2013-08-06 10:19:08 AM

Girl Sailor: Which gets me to point three. Saying "the music industry is dead" is really just code for saying "the bands I like aren't popular". There are still artists who sell millions of records. You may not like Beyonce, but someone does. What you're complaining about is the fact that the kind of music you like isn't turning your favorite musicians (and in many cases, yourselves) into mega-rich superstars. Is that really what you want? Do you really want your favorite band to sell 10 million records at a shot? Do you want your favorite music on the radio, in tv, and online so much that you can't stand to listen to it any longer?


I have a beef with the crap that i'm being forced to hear at work, in the supermarket, commercials, etc.
"Back when music was better", companies acquired an artist's music because it had a vibe, or a synergy with their product. That music originated from the artist's soul. It was just coincidence the company had a liking to it. Nowadays, the music is cultivated for the commercial markets.
Music is no longer food for the soul. It's food for the shareholders.
 
2013-08-06 10:31:52 AM

Bonkthat_Again: Girl Sailor: Which gets me to point three. Saying "the music industry is dead" is really just code for saying "the bands I like aren't popular". There are still artists who sell millions of records. You may not like Beyonce, but someone does. What you're complaining about is the fact that the kind of music you like isn't turning your favorite musicians (and in many cases, yourselves) into mega-rich superstars. Is that really what you want? Do you really want your favorite band to sell 10 million records at a shot? Do you want your favorite music on the radio, in tv, and online so much that you can't stand to listen to it any longer?

I have a beef with the crap that i'm being forced to hear at work, in the supermarket, commercials, etc.
"Back when music was better", companies acquired an artist's music because it had a vibe, or a synergy with their product. That music originated from the artist's soul. It was just coincidence the company had a liking to it. Nowadays, the music is cultivated for the commercial markets.
Music is no longer food for the soul. It's food for the shareholders.


But that's always been the case. Remember what music in the grocery stores was like years ago? I promise it wasn't cool. It was the lowest common denominator based on who the biggest group of shoppers in the store was. Chances are that wasn't you. Artist development exists in small pockets, not on a wide scale, same as always. Yes, top 40 tunes are generated based on the perceived audience for them. They suck, I agree. But that's what's awesome about the internet. Don't like terrestrial radio? Go online.
 
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